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I have a few questions as clicker training is very new to me. Our training facility promotes the use of clicker training, with corrections when needed.

Dante is the first dog I've ever used a clicker with. I do several short sessions a day with him, right now working on focus (which he is spectacular at), sit (also great at), and starting down and "by heel" (setting up for a heel position).

He is doing remarkably well and I'm shocked how well this works. I have a few questions though. Our first class doesn't start until Sat. What happens when the group of 20'ish people are clicking away with their puppies in one big room? Won't he get confused hearing all the clicks or will the focus teach him to only listen to "our" clicker? The first class was info only, and what to work on this week.

Up until today I was working with him in the house or in the front yard, but figured distractions would be good for focus training. However, I started working yesterday with Micah and Kodi on the clicker (just loading it - click - treat and sit - click - treat). So today, they heard the click and came running! It only took seconds before I had two big guys sitting side by side with Dante interested in focus training.

Cute, but how practical is this at this stage? As it was Dante's training session, they weren't getting treats when they heard the clicker. Will this mess them up? Should I keep working them all seperate from eachother so they don't think they aren't getting rewarded for good behavior?

As a sidenote, Dante did awesome and couldn't have cared less what they were doing. He was 100% focus'd on me. I have to admit this is an interesting training method, and I'm going through cheerios like crazy (haha) between all of them, but they sure do respond well to it.
 

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Twenty dogs in one group? In a building? And clickers? :eek:

For me, personally that would be a little too much. I prefer small groups of five dogs, or less than that and/or single training.

You probably can't even hear your own click with all that noise from the other dogs and their handlers.

While I know that we haven't had issues in a group outdoors I am not certain how it would work indoors.

Personally, I wouldn't want to train in such a large group.
 

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I have wondered this same question, plus can you work a clicker with two dogs at once? At home, I mean. If you click for one dog, and dog two hears the click but doesn't get a treat because it's not for her, than won't it eventually wreck the clicker for her?
 

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I can't imagine how that would work, I've never seen a group that size use clicker training. I did use it on my two pups at once mostly for teaching recall and they waited their turns for the treat.
 

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Well, they turn out excellent results in the training. It's a huge facility and 20 in a puppy class is apparently a small class. so it must work somehow, but I'm just not sure how.
 

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I have wondered this same question, plus can you work a clicker with two dogs at once? At home, I mean. If you click for one dog, and dog two hears the click but doesn't get a treat because it's not for her, than won't it eventually wreck the clicker for her?
i don't use the clicker on multiple dogs the same time. Because of that issue I used my husbands office as a clickerroom and left the other two in the livingroom. That way they knew it wasn their time of training.

As for large groups, personally, I don't like training in large groups. I didn't get anywhere and had much better results training by myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We like the socialization of a large group class setting, so that's why we enroll in classes with all the dogs. I've never trained at this facility previously, but they offer year long training groups for advanced OB and agility, which no one else around offers. In order to join the groups you must first complete novice OB (min age 5 1/2 mo) so we figured we would just take him through puppy for the socialization and then novice so we can graduate into the advanced OB or agility group.
 

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Wow, 20 dogs in one class is a lot. When I took Levels classes, a "full" class was 8 people and their dogs - and they would have two or three trainers in the class to ensure everyone understood and was doing the exercises correctly. 20 dogs and their people in one room, with clickers, and with only one trainer doesn't sound like much learning is going to happen. Socialization, yes, but not as well-supervised by a trainer as I would like, as far as I'm concerned.
 

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I don't think the classes I've taken that used clickers were that large, the most was probably 10 dogs. However there was never any confusion except maybe for the first few minutes of the first class session, if a dog was not used to being in a place where other people are using clickers.

It's basically like saying being in a group class, your dog would get confused by the other people giving their dogs commands or praise. You can have a large group of dogs in a training class, but when you tell your dog to sit every dog in the class does not sit do they?

The dogs realize very quickly that they only get a reward when their owner clicks and I've never seen a dog have trouble tuning out the other people clicking while still responding to their own owner. The first few times they hear a click from across the room they might whip their head around and look for a treat, but they figure it out pretty quick. Dogs have very good hearing, and I am sure there are subtle differences between each clicker that they can pick up, plus the fact that they have no bond with the other dog owners and are used to paying attention to their own person and not to everyone in the room.

As far as clicker training several dogs at once at home, I know some people who do but they usually find a way to differentiate between the dogs such as having different clickers/noises, or saying the dog's name before clicking so the dogs can tell which dog you mean. Personally I've found it easier to separate my dogs (when I had more than one) while working with one at a time. This avoids confusing or the possibility of reinforcing a dog for the 'wrong' thing.
 

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As it was Dante's training session, they weren't getting treats when they heard the clicker.
That sounds really confusing to me, from a dog's point of view, especially if you are only beginning clicker training with them. At this point, the click should mean "you're doing right and a reward is coming". If you click without the reward, will they still understand what the click means and how you are using it?
 

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What Chicagocanine and Chris said. ^

When I'm training one of my dogs the other dog is put away out of earshot. The dog I'm not working with is either crated in the bedroom with the door closed (we have stereo speakers throughout the house, so that helps to hide the sound too) or outside in the garage pen, depending on where I'm working with the other dog.

Not all clickers sound the same, so the differents sounds along with the clicker's proximity to the dog should clear up any confusion in a class setting.
 

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Wow, 20 dogs in one class is a lot. When I took Levels classes, a "full" class was 8 people and their dogs - and they would have two or three trainers in the class to ensure everyone understood and was doing the exercises correctly. 20 dogs and their people in one room, with clickers, and with only one trainer doesn't sound like much learning is going to happen. Socialization, yes, but not as well-supervised by a trainer as I would like, as far as I'm concerned.
This is an excellent facility, and there are multiple trainers not just one.

Does anyone know the answers to my original questions...?
 

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What Chicagocanine and Chris said. ^

When I'm training one of my dogs the other dog is put away out of earshot. The dog I'm not working with is either crated in the bedroom with the door closed (we have stereo speakers throughout the house, so that helps to hide the sound too) or outside in the garage pen, depending on where I'm working with the other dog.

Not all clickers sound the same, so the differents sounds along with the clicker's proximity to the dog should clear up any confusion in a class setting.
Thank you, that answers everything! I will keep to working them away from the others so they don't get confused.
 

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I don't think the classes I've taken that used clickers were that large, the most was probably 10 dogs. However there was never any confusion except maybe for the first few minutes of the first class session, if a dog was not used to being in a place where other people are using clickers.

It's basically like saying being in a group class, your dog would get confused by the other people giving their dogs commands or praise. You can have a large group of dogs in a training class, but when you tell your dog to sit every dog in the class does not sit do they?

The dogs realize very quickly that they only get a reward when their owner clicks and I've never seen a dog have trouble tuning out the other people clicking while still responding to their own owner. The first few times they hear a click from across the room they might whip their head around and look for a treat, but they figure it out pretty quick. Dogs have very good hearing, and I am sure there are subtle differences between each clicker that they can pick up, plus the fact that they have no bond with the other dog owners and are used to paying attention to their own person and not to everyone in the room.

As far as clicker training several dogs at once at home, I know some people who do but they usually find a way to differentiate between the dogs such as having different clickers/noises, or saying the dog's name before clicking so the dogs can tell which dog you mean. Personally I've found it easier to separate my dogs (when I had more than one) while working with one at a time. This avoids confusing or the possibility of reinforcing a dog for the 'wrong' thing.
thank you :)
 

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I agree w chicagocanine. My guy has never been confused which marker (click or verbal) wAs his as it comes with a food reinforcer from me. Go have fun and let us know how it goes
 

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I do agility training in a room full of different dogs and clickers all going at the same time. And while 20 pups does sound like a bunch, if there a few trainers in the room that would make a difference.

Go. Have fun. Learn what you can. Have someone take videos/pictures to show us when you get back!
 

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I've been in a class with around 8 other dogs and everyone was using the same brand of clicker (provided by the teacher). Tho there may be tiny differences in the clicks from clicker to clicker, I think the dog knows the click is coming from you, who is giving the command and holds the treats, so other people clicking away isn't going to be much of a problem.

Sounds like a good class, have fun.
 
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