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Discussion Starter #1
I want to perfect Kenya's "leave it". I want "leave it" to mean she turns away from the object and sort of comes back to "check in" with me, so it's almost like a recall (but no formal front sit). So, do I click when she turns her head away from the object, when she starts moving toward me? Or, both....but when I do move from clicking for her changing attention to clicking her for coming to me?
 

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If you want Kenya to start coming back to you with the leave it, I would use the clicker first when she turns from the object and then move/shift to clicking when she moves toward you in a two step approach.

I use the leave it command just for telling Kayla to leave/ignore an object and move on. Depending on circumstances I'll use come, front, or with me when I want her to return to me. Since we do a lot of off leash walks and hikes, I don't necessarily need her to return to me but just leave/ignore something along the way.
 

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Click when she first turns away from the object, once she does that reliably then move on to the next thing, taking a couple steps toward you, or even just one step.
She may figure out what you want a little more quickly than that, but don't set the bar too high for her each time to where she gets lost.
Having a really good treat with you that she doesn't normally get when she responds to 'leave it' may encourage her progress a little more quickly as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A related question....has anyone done the TDI test? That's why we are practicing this. I ask b/c if I have Kenya doing a formal heel and something is on the ground, she won't look at it anyway, so I don't need to say "leave it". I wonder if that works for this test, or if they specifically want to see her go after the food and be called off...
 

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I did a mock Delta test with Risa over the winter. I don't think the dog has to 'engage' with the item and be called off. It's basically a safety issue. Will the dog ignore items on the floor?

I could be mistaken, but that's how I interpret it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If that counts than all the better for us! Of course in rally this weekend, we get the figure 8 with food and a toy on the floor!
 

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Crap, I've only done the TDI test 3 different times and you think I'd remember the answer to this?

Quote: I ask b/c if I have Kenya doing a formal heel and something is on the ground, she won't look at it anyway, so I don't need to say "leave it". I wonder if that works for this test, or if they specifically want to see her go after the food and be called off...
I'm not sure if this is during a portion of the test that we were even heeling. If it was just walking around with a loose leash, would your dog listen to you and not pick up the food on the ground? Neither the TDI or CGC test were as strict and formal as 'real' obedience. They want to see you are in control of your dog, and that the dog is socialized and sudden things won't craze your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, MRL. I tend to over-think these things sometimes! I guess I personally have high standards for a prospective therapy dog.
 

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I'm the same way. I practiced the CGC stuff with Ris more like we were going into Rally when that type of precision wasn't necessary. It worked out okay, however, since when she wasn't as attentive as required for Rally, it was still more than enough for the CGC requirements.
 

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When we test our (prospective certified therapy) dogs, we place a treat and toy a couple of feet in from where the dog makes a turn.

If the dog ignores them, all is well. If the dog seems overly interested, we expect the handler to be able to call them off.

Either way works - we are looking for the handler to anticipate and distract or command the dog from the temptations as much as we look for the dog to ignore.

I've taken 3 dogs thru the CGC and never had the treat distraction.

Like you, we expect much more from our dogs in order to pass and be certified with our program.
 
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