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I am considering buying a German Shepard puppy and possibly a Siberian Husky puppy too. I am new to raising dogs, but I did my research and I know that both require a LOT of attention.

My question here is; will they cope together? Has anyone had this experience? Some suggested that I get them in different sexes, but will a male/male combination fail?

Thanks in advance! :)
 

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NO. I raised a husky pup and shepherd pup together they were 6 days apart and best friends. But it was a nightmare. I would consider both of them advanced breeds to own, and you as a novice want to get two PUPPIES together,

Pick one raise it train it. In a year or so get another.

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Mine were both male. They did great together. But the shepherd was very destructive in a high energy level, working breed type of attitude. And the husky was very destructive in a stubborn, northern breed type of way. And they both require different training methods and it's just chaos and nuts
 

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GSDs and huskies cope really well. Normally males of a similar age would create a good pack, but they might fight time to time when grown up. Male/female combination is not recommended, unless you will sterilyse one of them (all love is of hormonal nature and your dog wouldn't love you as much as he could) or you have somebody in the family to look after one of dogs while the other is on heat. But, are you sure you have enough time and determinatio to train both? To have a trained GSD is a great pleasure, badly trained - police fines, bitten people and life on the leash. If you want to have GSD, in the best case you should look for Schutzhund club or agility club already, because you should start training your puppy from the very first day you get him. It's all about training and training two dogs simultaneously is not an easy task.
 

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First advice - do NOT get two puppies at the same time. Do a search on the forum. Though it can be done, it will be a nightmare. You have to be sure that each puppy gets one on one time with you, and they will likely bond more strongly with one another than to you. (Personally, something I wouldn't want to happen). You want them to listen to YOU and go off of YOUR cues, not each other's.

Also, we had Frenchies that were littermates. I'm sure this goes for any males that are close in age. They were best of buds for the longest time! Then one day, something set one of them off and if we looked at one of them and not the other, they'd get jealous and get into fights. We had to find one of them a new home, afraid we'd come home to a dead dog one day. It wasn't a fair way for either of them to live. (And they were neutered before they hit sexual maturity!)
And USUALLY males get along better than females! Hear the saying "Males fight for breeding rights, females fight for breathing rights?"
That holds pretty true. We currently have a lab and a pit bull that CANNOT be together under ANY CIRCUMSTANCES or there WILL be a blood bath. We have heavy duty metal gates with latches set up throughout the house to keep them apart.

Let me tell you (and I'm sure others can vouch as well): It is NOT fun having dogs (especially large ones) who decide they will kill one another if they are ever in one another's vicinity.

Also, huskies and GSDs are two totally different dogs.

GSDs are loyal, live to please, eager to learn.
Huskies are stubborn, not loyal, live for themselves....

My advice would be to get one, wait until it's at LEAST 18 months old (probably closer to two years old, though) then get another pup.
 

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I am planning to get a GSD for sure, and it's motivating since I am not alone in this and my family is willing to help in all aspects. I also wanted a Husky and since I am dedicated, then why not both?! It's not easy, I am aware of that. Also, a lot of my friends have experiences with dogs, none with huskies though, but they are willing to lend a hand. As for their training, I have a couple of trainers that are willing to visit by and give me and the dogs training sessions. Also I am planning on taking them on walks/runs at least 5 times a week around the block.

I am also planning to keep them outside in a shady place... Should I get them each separate houses? I guess that's the obvious thing to do... Also should I put the houses on grass or pavement tiles?! I don't think it matters, but some told me that grass is not good for them and others told me that pavement tiles may harm them as puppies, which is weird... :S

@Anubis_Star the destructive behavior you mentioned, you meant in the beginning before being well trained... Does that mean I have to separate them from the cars? :D We have a huge concrete fence surrounding the whole property, so the cars are not in garages...

Thanks for all the help again in advance :)
 

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I am also planning to keep them outside in a shady place...
And this is what makes me think a husky would be more suitable, so long as the climate wouldn't make the dog miserable.
Although their fur is built to keep them insulated from the cold, it can also keep them cool in the heat, but if it gets too hot where you are, it can be too much for any dog.

But GSDs need to be inside with their families. They are not dogs that do well outside with no human contact. You want a destructive dog? Leave a bored GSD outside with nothing to do.

I don't know too incredibly much about huskies, but I know sled dogs are kept outside in harsh conditions and are pretty much expected to fend for themselves.
That's not saying the dog won't need a lot (and I mean a LOT) of physical and mental stimulation.
I'm only saying that as an outside dog with little human contact, a husky would be better.

I know you want a GSD, but they do not thrive outside away from their people.
 

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@Konotashi, you just put me in a place where I can't decide. Typically, I am dedicated and love challenges and I was eager to get them both as they posed as a more challenging option, but what you just shared gave me second thoughts... I'll have to discuss this with my family, but most probably I'll be getting just the GSD for now...

Thanks a lot, this has been seriously helpful.
 

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I live in Cairo, Egypt, with temperatures in the summer reaching up to 50 degrees Celsius. I know huskies live in snowy environments mostly, but there are breeders for the super hot climate areas like mine and I actually found a couple. So I'm thinking a GSD would be a better option.

GSDs are loyal, live to please, eager to learn.
Huskies are stubborn, not loyal, live for themselves....
I know you want a GSD, but they do not thrive outside away from their people.
Help?! :D
 

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Darn, I thought you were going to ask something like how many protons and neutrons were in Mg.

Take the advise of doggiedad.

As you probably know these breeds are kind of polar opposites.
 

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If you want a well-trained dog you REALLY need to have them inside your home at least 50% of the time. That way you can teach them how to behave properly, redirect them when they do something wrong and build a bond with them that drives them to WANT to please you.

Having a German Shepherd that is kept outside the majority of the time will end up with you owning a large dog that has no manners and doesn't care at all about you.

Imagine making your child live in their room all the time. Yes, you could bring them food and water and even let them go to the bathroom but how will they LEARN? Learn to behave around other people, learn to get along with people, learn to talk, to write, to do ANYTHING??

Keeping a dog outside all the time is the same thing.
 

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Normally males of a similar age would create a good pack, but they might fight time to time when grown up. Male/female combination is not recommended, unless you will sterilyse one of them (all love is of hormonal nature and your dog wouldn't love you as much as he could) or you have somebody in the family to look after one of dogs while the other is on heat.
I'm sorry but this is some of the WORST advice I've seen given on this board.

Having same sex pairs has been NOT recommend by many on this board - and usually from personal experience.

A male/female pair is ALWAYS the best way to go if you want to have two dogs. Common sense dictates either having them separated during heat cycles or having one or both sterilized.

Two males may fight each other constantly when mature. While it may be mostly noise and show it can still cause problems.

Two females together can fight to the death. Been there, ALMOST done that (I came home in time to save the one being attacked).
 

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I am planning to get a GSD for sure, and it's motivating since I am not alone in this and my family is willing to help in all aspects. I also wanted a Husky and since I am dedicated, then why not both?! It's not easy, I am aware of that. Also, a lot of my friends have experiences with dogs, none with huskies though, but they are willing to lend a hand. As for their training, I have a couple of trainers that are willing to visit by and give me and the dogs training sessions. Also I am planning on taking them on walks/runs at least 5 times a week around the block.
..

Thanks for all the help again in advance :)
Sorry this stuck out to me.
5 times a week around the block???? I have ONE gsd and she needs walks 2 or 3 times a DAY.
and for your "motivated so why not both" comment...if this is your first dog please just get one, it is much much more tiring than you think. You sound young because you mention family permission and their help. That might be an incorrect assumption, I apologize if it is, but be prepared to set aside a certain time a day for the pup...then multiply that by 5 :p I'm a college student and raising a puppy was so tiring for me I swore up and down I would never get another one, only adult dogs...well that has changed, I want another some day but know MUCH more about the work involved. Good luck!
 

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I must've missed the 5 times a week around the block statement.

That'll be sufficient if you want a dog/dogs that are going to drive you absolutely insane and destroy your house/yard.

A walk a day around my entire neighborhood (which is probably a mile or more?) isn't sufficient for my Pomeranian! For a large breed that's bred to move all day (which includes both of the breeds you're considering) you'll need to do a LOT more than that. And even if you do hours of physical exercise with the dog(s), you'll still need to stimulate their minds. You can wear out their bodies, but their minds can keep going like the Energizer bunny if you don't tire their brains out, too.

German shepherds were bred to be able to act as moving fences to keep sheep in line. All day long.

Huskies were bred to pull sleds that weren't very light for hundreds of miles a day in extremely harsh conditions on low food rations for weeks or months at a time.

A quick walk around the block a few times per week won't cut it....
 
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