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Most of the members here have their dogs CGC Certified. I was wondering at around what age should I expect my GSD to be mature enough (and with proper training) to be ready for CGC certification?
 

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Every dog and trainer are different.

Myself, I put a CGN (Canadian equivalent of the CGC) on my Shih Tzu when she was 10 years old.
 

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Reba was 4 years when she first got hers.
Discoe got it at 4 months, and then again at 2 years.
Every dog and trainer is indeed different, like Angelas said.
 

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No, I just felt like doing it again. The one that I did at 4 months, I hadn't intended to do. I just had her with me that day, and did it to see if she could. I did it again at 2 just because I wasn't sure a CGC at 4 months would be taken seriously, as temperaments change. I wanted to have a more recent one on record.
 

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Not a problem :)
The SG2 is a show rating through the SV. We went to a regional show in 2010. SG is the rating, and she was the second place dog in the Young Females class.
CAC is another show rating, through the IABCA (International All Breed Canine Association). It's a show where your dog is judged by four different judges (they are conformation judges in varying venues in the US, Canada and Europe). The CAC is their "National Champion" rating.
The BH is the Begleithund. It incorporates an obedience routine, and then also includes a temperament test.
The AD is the Ausdauerpruefung, another SV qualification. This is to measure the endurance of the dog, and involves a 12 mile bike ride where the dog jogs alongside on-leash.
The CD is an AKC title: The Companion Dog. Similar in a way to the BH, it displays the dog's obedience on and off leash. The CD must be passed three times (called "legs") under at least two different judges.
HOT is simply a designation that means Handler-Owner Trained. People who use this designation use it to display that the dog was not sent out for training, but rather was worked with by them to achieve its titling.
Finally, the CERF is an eye test, to certify that the dog is not suffering from eye problems that could potentially be passed on to offspring. :)
 
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