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I got a situation that is probably common enough. Dog and cat living together, cat hates dog and seems to go out of her way to attack the dog sometimes. my question is has anyone saw or heard of a situation where a cat has injured a dogs eye from doing this? I'm thinking of getting the cat declawed to prevent anything like that from happening but was wondering it is a rare thing to occur. Any stories or info would be great. Thanks in advance guys!

-Matt
 

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Can't help you there and hope you figure it out soon, but I just wanted to say that I would never have that problem cause mine hates cats, I have a neighbor that walks her dog and have her cat walking behind her. Now my dog is not aggressive at all but not when it comes to cat, I have to make sure that she's restrained whenever that lady is around. sometimes I see the hair on the back of the dag standing up but there is nothing around and couple of minutes later I see the cat just wondering around.
 

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I have a human buddy who got pretty serious eye problems from "his" cat clawing his eye. So I think it would be just as bad for dogs.
 

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I had the same issue with my older cat in regards to my 9 year old dog. A simple spray bottle with water solved that problem. I have since gotten her a friend and she has totally left the dogs alone.
 

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my cats swat at my dogs all the time and sometimes get them on the nose, i just make sure the cats claws are cut all the time, i personally dont believe in de clawing a cat, if you do de-calw it has to be when they are kittens or it will throw them into shock. happened to a family cat of mine when i was little. very sad.
 

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There are many downsides to declawing - the main one is refusal to use a litterbox (scratching at the litter causes pain).

I would work on keeping the cats nail trimmed short or get some Soft Claws:

Welcome to SoftClaws for Cats
 

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Keep the cat's nails trimmed, and have a water bottle handy to squirt the cat when she goes after the dog.

How old is the cat? How old was she when you got her? How old was she when the dog came on the scene?

One of these days, the dog is going to teach kitty a lesson. Hopefully one lesson (without serious injury) will dissuade the cat from launching random attacks.

I once had a cat that attacked my dogs, for NO reason. She was a female, a stray I'd picked up as a kitten, and got along great with everybody until she was about 18 months of age. Then she became a holy terror and started attacking everyone for no apparent reason. The day my blind, deaf, 16 year old dog came tottering into the room and the cat ran over and smacked her on the nose, she became an outdoor cat.

Outdoors, she was as sweet as pie. I guess she just hated being cooped up with other animals in "her" space. I find that female cats are much worse in this respect than males.
 

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I have never had a declawed cat until I got Mitsey.I believe that a lot of her issues are as a result of her previous owners declawing her.


There are many downsides to declawing - the main one is refusal to use a litterbox (scratching at the litter causes pain).

I would work on keeping the cats nail trimmed short or get some Soft Claws:

Welcome to SoftClaws for Cats
 

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It's a training issue between the dog and cat. Teach the dog to respect the cats boundaries and the cat will normally respect the dog's.

I have owned and met many a declawed cat and many of the cats in the shelter have had issues prior to declaw. At the same time, I would recommend solving the issue prior to resulting to surgery. Surgery should never be a quick fix. Work on having the dog and cat respect each other and that will solve more issued than surgery will. Start with peaceful mealtimes with everyone eating in the same room and branch out from there.
 

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I thought about declawing mine since he's a butthead anyway. We ended up not doing it but threaten him with it all the time. Dog and cat play but cat like to play rough. I keep George's nails trimmed short at all times to minimaze the chance of injury.
 

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Hehe... I just keep telling him that I'll bathe him, shave him, THEN declaw him. George is the dirtbag of the family... he's just always into something... pain in the butt. But he's a good cat regardless
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow! Thanks for all the great advice and help! I am trying to do everything I can so I can avoid declawing the cat. I think I will keep a water spray bottle around to see how that works. I'm also going to try the soft claws.
Freestep- I got the cat when she was a kitten, had her for about 4 years but in between that I left home for basic training and tech school. "Kitty" yes thats her name, has tolerated other dogs in the past but I believe this situation is different because i'm bringing the pup into her house.

Again thanks for all the help, if you got anything else let me know. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
There are many downsides to declawing - the main one is refusal to use a litterbox (scratching at the litter causes pain).

I would work on keeping the cats nail trimmed short or get some Soft Claws:

Welcome to SoftClaws for Cats
I did not think these things were serious when I went to the web page, I had a good laugh at all the cats with sparkling claws :) But it does seem like a great idea and alternative to declawing. I'm going to get some and try it out. Thank you for the suggestion!!!!
 

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I have two cats that live here, one of which is very aggressive. I watched them interact with my gsd Kipper very closely.
In my opinion you have nothing to worry about. Your dog might get a scratch on his nose once in a while, but your cats head will be to close to your dogs mouth in order to scratch his eye. The cats not going to take that risk, since they only have 9 lives.
 

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I'm not a big fan of the SoftPaws. I've tried them on my cats and they fall off within days; I had one cat who would dutifully remove each one as soon as I put them on. I think keeping the nails trimmed short will work just as well.
 
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