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Hi, my boy Duece was dx with hip dysplasia several months ago. He had x rays as a puppy (he is now 4 1/2) and there was no sign of it but all of a sudden he could barely get up and stopped eating so we took him in and had x rays done again which showed he had moderate dysplasia in one hip. We started him on adequan @ 1 shot every week for 6 weeks and now we give him 1 shot every 4-6 weeks. It helped tremendously although he still has good days and bad days. Here lately he has had more bad days and I am thinking it has to do with the weather here in FL (constant rain). We give him carprofen and tramadol as needed. Tramadol is not too bad price wise but the carprofen is expensive and I was wondering if anyone new of any natural alternative I could give him that will not break my bank account. We also give him a supplement called HIP HEALTH that has glucosamine and vitamin C in it.

He is still so young and is full of energy and wants so badly to play ball, his all time favorite, but if we let him he pays for it for several days. Along with any ideas on Carprofen alternatives I would love any other advice on what we can do for him. Hip replacement is just not in the budget for us. I love my boy and hate to see him in so much pain. Thank you in advance!
Susan
 

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Some things...
Acupuncture
Physical therapy
Stem cell (??? I don't know for sure)
*FHO instead of THR (Lakl has had a dog have both hips done with an FHO)
I am never sure if it is Zeel...it might be Homeopathic remedy equivalent to Rimadyl in Clinical Study Harmony Veterinary Center

DogAware.com Health: Arthritis in Dogs tons of info there

And here: Holistic Care for Pets at the bottom
Pain in Dogs and Cats: Introduction and Basics Pain in Dogs and Cats: Injuries, Mild Pain, Arthritis, First Aid Pain in Dogs and Cats: Post-Surgery, Severe Pain

Whatever you use, natural or prescription, supplement whatever - there can be side effects (like arnica is a blood thinning thing). I like to just add one thing at a time so I can see what will work and what will not. I also keep a list of ingredients of things they take so I can show it to a vet if they are sick or need a surgery.
 

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Good old fashioned bone broth...$0.05/day depending on the bones you get Especially chicken frames for the cartiledge re: type 11 collagen. Bone broth/stock also contains naturally available glucs/chon. as well as other nutrients that all work together to nourish the joints. The trick is you have to cook it long enough that after refridgeration it is gelatinous...using about a 1/4c of vinegar will help extract all the micro nutrients. PM you how I make if you want.

Here's a link that gives some properties
The Healing Power of Bone Broth Transition Now

You can add things in near aend of cooking time...but best to do in slow cooker for 24+hrs.:)

Many other things too that will help w/inflammation...but this will help repair/rebuild soft tissues as well as support immune system so the body can create and heal itself. AND it's the cheapest too...about 30 days (my dogs results from knee injury)..1/2c to 1c per day...strain bones!!! refridgerate overnight and skim lard type fat, portion and freeze in 4-5 day portions
 
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Is there a summary of hip issues here?
My newly adopted 8 year old dog just dx d X-ray
Right rear leg mild hip dysplasia....she heavily breathes sometimes at night...



I have tried tramadol a couple times...

But I’m hoping to do everything I can with supplements.

Acupuncture, Pt...just looking where to start.
Vet said no need for surgery at this time.
 

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I was wondering is there any kind of special nutrition to help with hyp dysplasia? my budget will not go for physical therapy I am afraid...
 

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When I had to deal with HD with Gracie, I was able to get the vet to give me a prescription for the human equivalent to metacam, I believe it's called meloxicam. It's in pill form. Saved me approximately $150 monthly. With that savings I was able to book H2o sessions for her, where she could go for weekly swims in a heated pool.
 

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Bone broth is part of my boy’s diet, has been for a long time. The link above has a recipe. Just made a batch about a week ago. I don’t think it is as powerful as meds when immediate relief is needed but I have no doubt that it has help his general health immensely.
 
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Even though this is an old post, I want to clean up some info since newbies are bringing it back. We have WAY better threads on arthritis management in the archives though.

First, carprofen is not expensive. It should be CHEAP, because it's a generic for Rimadyl -- one of the oldest canine NSAIDs. A bottle of 60 generic carprofen cost less than $30 from a good, legitimate pet pharmacy. That's a 2-month supply. A bottle of 180 is under $70 -- 6-month supply.

I usually buy it from Valleyvet.com with a vet's RX -- Novox Caplets generic Carprofen. Chewy is another option in the same price range -- try code RX20 at Chewy for 20% off prescriptions. They will fax your vet the request for prescription approval, if your vet agrees to let you fill it this way.

Both Valley Vet and Chewy are Vet-VIPPS accredited, only sell FDA approved, in-date drugs, manufactured for the U.S. market. They're the same meds you'd get from a vet. Costco, Sam's and Walmart Pharmacies also all sell Carprofen (slightly higher than online, but cheaper than the vet).

Sometimes pain meds are the only humane alternative. I'd rather a dog not need them, or not have to have them chronically. If the dog needs them, I think it's inhumane not to provide them if a dog is hurting though. My strategy is to use them to knock the pain down while coming up with another plan, and see if they can be faded gradually once that plan is implemented.

Tramadol is not very useful for dogs for pain management--a few years ago, researchers found that it makes dogs high, but it doesn't plug into the same pain-blocking receptors that humans have and isn't actually doing much for pain in dogs. It kind of looks like it is because they're high, but when they studied pain response, it wasn't doing what they had thought it was. Many vets have stopped using it. Some still use it in conjunction with carprofen (but the carprofen is doing most of the work).

Adequan should be considered as a "first-line intervention" for canine arthritis IMHO -- it preserves joint cartilage, lubricating the joint. The earlier you start it, the more cartilage you can preserve, but even with advanced arthritis, it can have a near-miraculous effect on some dogs. It's REALLY good stuff. About half the dogs get an anti-inflammatory effect from it -- you'll know within 3 weeks if your dog will get that effect. It can avoid the need for NSAIDs for those dogs.

If a dog is on Adequan for maintenance, the interval of maintenance can be variable. Some dogs can hold with monthly injections. Some need them every other week. You have to listen to the dog to find the sweet spot. If the cost of Adequan is tough on your budget, you can give it at home with your vet's RX , or ask your vet about switching to ICHON (again, valleyvet.com) which is a generic-equivalent to Adequan, used off-label. Our rescue's vet has used a lot of Ichon, for years, to save clients money.

Acupuncture helps some dogs. It's expensive and has to be done frequently, but there seems to be a real, substantial benefit for some dogs.

Swimming helps some as well, especially if you can find a heated pool that you and the dog can get into together (put the dog in a swim vest and hold it up to make it easier). A warm pool is better than a cold pool for arthritis.

Exercise is pretty important for arthritis. Keep them walking as long as you can. It's a "use it or lose it" deal for them, just as for us, once arthritis starts. Sedentary lifestyles will put these dogs in the grave a lot faster--one of my vets literally prescribes "daily walking" for his arthritis patients to drive the point home to their owners.

There are many good threads here about arthritis supplements -- linking to research supporting them, etc. We've discussed Natural Eggshell Membrane, MSM, and Type II Collagen (hyaluronic acid), as well as turmeric and several other things.

Glucosamine has been a bust in the research, except for a manufacturer-funded study of a patented form that's probably not what you're going to buy at a regular store. In some old thread, I have a post that links all of the available research on glucosamine. It's disapointing. It's more likely to work in the patented form, with chondroitin, MSM, and some other nutraceuticals. The patented form is in the Nutramax products like Dasuquin (Dasuquin Advanced brings together that plus some other goodies that have some research showing they help arthritis). Dasuquin Advanced is only available from a vet, and it costs about $70/60-count bottle. Regular Dasuquin with MSM is available from any good pet supply (avoid Amazon -- they're known to sell fakes).
 
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