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Discussion Starter #1
Okay folks, we are going to use a canine seat belt system for our new pup.

We were thinking of the Champion seat belt systems with the Survivor restraint buckle. They have a puppy package discount that gives you a second champion at a discount for when they are still smaller.

Thoughts? What seat belt systems have you used and do you like them?

We use crating also in the larger vehicle, but this is for when he is in a passenger seat area in the back seat
 

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I know at least one person on here has them. I plan on getting one when I have the extra cash. To me they seem like the safest and most durable and practical of all the ones I have seen. I did buy another one, that was cheaper and I am not a fan, we don't even use it anymore because of how Dakota would get tangled in it and only be in the car for 2 minutes.
 

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That is what I have, love it, works well for the dogs. I was actually in a car accident a few months ago with both dogs in the car. If not for those seat belt harnesses they would have gone through the windshield. They were unharmed in the accident.
 

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The Champion K-9 seatbelts are really nicely made and well thought out. However, speaking from experience with this company, be aware you may need to really be on them to actually get your product. It took me several calls, a ton of emails, and about 6 weeks to get my last order from them and I won't order from them anymore after that experience. Product - great. Service - yeah, not so much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have heard too that they are notorious for delayed service. Good thing I am starting on this a month ahead of time :)

Any thoughts on the Rodie Ruffrider?
 

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I use an Easy Rider and I'm very dissapointed with it. It would work well if Loki was the kind of dog that just sits still, but he's not and gets tangled up in it by turning in circles and rolling around, or he'll slip off the car seat and be stuck on the floor.

My car is too small to put a crate back there (And two door so it has to be assembled in the car.) I've been looking for a new option and thought maybe a collapsible crate or a seat barrier.

I've heard mixed reviews on the seat harnesses that either they work great in a wreck or don't help at all, but I'm really just concerned about keeping him out of the front seat!
 

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I have the RuffRider... or whatever it is called and I am not a fan... at all. It attached though a loop on the harness strap, the seatbelt goes through, so you have no pivoting action, So if he moves at all I end up with a dog tangled in seatbelt and harness... not good on a 5 hour trip....
 

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I don't think I would use a dog seatbelt on any of my dogs.
These seat belts are not applying the same rules of physics that save the lives of people.
3 point seat belts save people because much of their weight is spread between the 3 points. This is why small kids need booster seats. With these dog seatbelts I wouldn't be surprised if with a big enough impact, it would actually kill the dog. A properly fitted and secured crate placed sideways in your car would probably be safer. That way you dog is safe from projectiles, becoming a projectile and all of their weight is distributed as evenly as possible upon impact, not just their heart and lungs taking all of the force while 70% of their weight is sailing across the car.
 

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Actually I know of a number of cases where crated either broke or came open in an accident and the dog(s) ended up loose on the highway. :( Not a good outcome.

There are only a few seatbelt brands that are safety-tested (crash tested) and/or strength rated. Champion and Roadie (Ruff Rider) are two, the others I know of are Snoozer and PetBuckle. Personally I've only tried the first two. I like the Champion much better and that is what I use.
 

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I know I would prefer to use a crate to secure Carly when she rides in the car, but driving a Mini Cooper doesn't allow for GSD size crates! I can still cram her in a crate with my back seats down, but at 5 months old she is fast outgrowing it!

As soon as I figure out what size seatbelt to get for her, I'm ordering one...
 

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Wow I feel like a bad 'parent'..

I let him hang out in the cargo area of the suv.. or in the bed of the pickup depending how long of a distance we have to go.
 

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Having a physical barrier between you and your dog in the vehicle is the best solution, in my opinion, and they do make a large variety of vehicle barriers, of varying quality. That way, your dog does not get tangled up, he doesn't get restrained by a seatbelt system that might kill him, nor are you relying on a crate that might break or pop open on impact.

Speaking of crates popping open, one of the girls I train with has a Bulldog puppy, and they have now found her waiting at the door several times even though she was crated. Turns out, because the crate is up against the wall, the puppy has learned she can "jump" on the inside of the crate, and if she uses enough force to push that side into the wall, it bends out of shape and the door pops open. (This is a VariKennel with the older style door closure.)

or in the bed of the pickup depending how long of a distance we have to go.
The only time a dog is safe riding in the bed of a pickup truck is if the dog is secured inside a crate, and the crate is secured to the truck in a way that prevents it from sliding around. Loose dogs in the back of pickup trucks, or dogs secured by a leash or harness to the bed of a pickup truck are a disaster waiting to happen.
 

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If the dog is behind a barrier, wouldn't they still be slamming against things in an impact as they are basically unrestrained? Wouldn't they still be able to get out and get hit if a window broke during an accident?
 

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If the dog is behind a barrier, wouldn't they still be slamming against things in an impact as they are basically unrestrained? Wouldn't they still be able to get out and get hit if a window broke during an accident?
How is a dog suppost to get loose with a seatbelt setup? You can't say 100% someone will be there durring the event of an accident to let them loose.

It's a catch 22..good for fender benders and such. But serious accidents, not so much a great idea...

:confused:
 

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seat belt systems are good. i would also
train my dog not to exit the car without
a signal or command even if the doors are open
and someone is calling him or a dog is standing
right in front of the door, etc.

i would also teach him to stay
in one area of the car.
 

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If the dog is behind a barrier, wouldn't they still be slamming against things in an impact as they are basically unrestrained? Wouldn't they still be able to get out and get hit if a window broke during an accident?
This is key why our dogs need to have SOME kind of securing to the vehicle.

When an accident happens, it's fast and traumatic for everyone. Windows and doors frequently break and would allow a dog that may have lived thru the impact, easy access to get out to just try to get away from what just happened.

To either get killed on the road, or loose and lost.

While both the dog belts and crates allow some movement so our dogs will still get tossed around some and clearly NOT as good as the human belts that really pin us in place for MAXIMUM safety. Both limit the movement a whole lot better than if we choose to have them loose in the vehicle. Both also work well to keep the dog in the car so that we have a chance to then get them out when it is safe.
 

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How is a dog suppost to get loose with a seatbelt setup? You can't say 100% someone will be there durring the event of an accident to let them loose.
Why do you want them to be loose in an accident?
A dog who is loose during an accident becomes basically a projectile and may slam into other objects, seats, windows/windshield or hit other passengers with hundreds or thousands of pounds of force even if it is not a high speed crash.
A dog who is loose after an accident is likely to be scared and run off (getting lost or possibly hit/killed on the road-- I've read about several incidents where that happened) or if not they may try to protect the vehicle or their owner against rescue personnel, preventing them from helping.
 

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How is a dog suppost to get loose with a seatbelt setup? You can't say 100% someone will be there durring the event of an accident to let them loose.

It's a catch 22..good for fender benders and such. But serious accidents, not so much a great idea...

:confused:

the rescue squad, police, witnesses.... ???
 

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Until someone comes up with a good restraint system for dogs in moving vehicles, any type of restraint used is about minimizing risk to the humans who are in the vehicle with the dog.

In all types of accidents, a dog is more likely to be injured than the people in the car, regardless of whether they are crated, behind a barrier, or using a seatbelt system. A barrier prevents the dog from slamming into the human passengers with x amount of force. A crate, to some amount, does as well, although, unless the crate is secured, the entire thing plus dog can slam into the driver's seat, especially if it's a crate sitting in the back of an SUV with the rear seats down.

As for the dog getting loose after an accident - even if a dog was restrained, it's still possible for the dog to get loose. It depends on the accident. What happens. How the restraints hold up. Whether the crate breaks open or the buckles give out on the harness. A lot of dog harnesses rely on plastic buckles to hold the dog - buckles that will be likely to give out in a collision if a lot of force hits them.
 
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