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Discussion Starter #1
Pups that'll most likely develop strong working relationships with their people vs those that may be more independent ?
 

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Yes they can. The puppies who want to interact with humans usually make the best workers. They can also test the puppy's play and retrieve drives using toys.

A puppy that is more independent or only wants to play with its littermates will be more difficult to train.
 

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Yes they can. The puppies who want to interact with humans usually make the best workers. They can also test the puppy's play and retrieve drives using toys.

A puppy that is more independent or only wants to play with its littermates will be more difficult to train.
I've only been around a few litters and other than the pups biting my shoes or pant legs, I'm not sure what else they do to demonstrate the urge to work with their people, lol
 

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Nigel PM me your e-mail. I have a puppy test that will help you figure it out! It worked very well for me when I used it to choose one of my dogs!

Unfortunately, it's in PDF form, so I can't post it here, and we aren't allowed to send attachments via PM.

One thing you have to do when testing a pup is separate it from its littermates in order to avoid distractions.
 

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Yes, but not always. Some puppies can surprise us. My young female, Jarka, loves to work with me. She races to our training building when I take her outside and is very easy to engage. At other times she is so darn independent I wonder if she is the same dog. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have one that is very in tune with me, but not ultra clingy and I really like this. Sometimes I wonder if she does things I ask of her solely because of this relationship and not because she has stellar nerves, hers are pretty good, but not great

I was not sure how she came to be like this, genetics, something I've done or possibly both. I'd like to think that down the road I would like to find this trait again if possible.
 

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Nigel PM me your e-mail. I have a puppy test that will help you figure it out! It worked very well for me when I used it to choose one of my dogs!

Unfortunately, it's in PDF form, so I can't post it here, and we aren't allowed to send attachments via PM.

One thing you have to do when testing a pup is separate it from its littermates in order to avoid distractions.
PM sent!
 

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When adopting a pup, you take it home with its potential. How it turns out as an adult dog is up to you.
I agree that a lot if it is potential, but what the potential is, is determined by genetics. The owner can maximize what’s there but he or she can’t create potential out of whole cloth.




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Here are some puppies who wish to engage :)

 

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To me potential is anything you take home, no matter what has formed it.
Okay, bit it is still limited or enhanced by genetics. You can develop what’s there. You cannot create what the pup just plain doesn’t have. At best you will be compensating and can only compensate so far.




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I went to pick a puppy at Ingas breeders kennel. I sat down on the floor among the puppies. Inga came and got in my lap. I thought how cute and put her aside to evaluate the other puppies. She got in my lap again and stayed there. Laughing, I put her aside. Again she came and got in my lap. Thats it I said, and put my baby collar on her to show she was taken. She was 5 weeks old at that time. I don't know how less engaging puppies would have turned out since she is my first German Shepherd. I did not pick Inga, she picked me. :)
 

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@Muskeg, I know nothing, and have seen similar video posted by breeders who train and sell protection dogs. Is that not how to properly test for that kind of potential? I am asking because I really don’t know.
 

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Well, they certainly get a good grip. Mals are like GSDs on steroids they say. I posted it because its a puppy vid I think is funny. The puppies are certainly fat and look well taken care of.
 

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Nurse Bishop, I used the puppy test on the pup I was interested in, and she passed it with flying colours, showing all the characteristics I'd hoped for.

But what really clinched the sale was at the end of the test, I sat down in the big recliner rocker they had in the whelping/puppy room, and she jumped up into my lap, and curled up and went to sleep...:wub:
 

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I agree that a lot if it is potential, but what the potential is, is determined by genetics. The owner can maximize what’s there but he or she can’t create potential out of whole cloth.




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This! If genetics accounted for so little, then there would never be any wash outs in any venues. There are reasons that some breeds are used to hunt, others to herd sheep, some to do police or military work, etc., and even within those breeds are lines of significant temperamental and behavioral genetics which determine whether the dog will or will not succeed with appropriate training in any venue.

Sure, a superior trainer sometimes can be a tipping point for an iffy dog. Sometimes those trainers can make a "less than" dog look like it got the right stuff by enhancing or suppressing natural traits, but training will not pass on to progeny, so best to look to what the dog is genetically and match it to the appropriate home / venue.
 
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