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Discussion Starter #1
So my husband and I like to go camping but haven't since we got Gunther. He's trained well enough now where I'm comfortable taking him out to go camping. I have questions though like:

1: What do you do for water while hiking?

2: Is a backpack a good idea and should I start putting one on him at home to get him comfortable in wearing one?

3: How have you taught your dog to stay away from the campfire? He's singed his tail (just the fur) once when we had a little fire in our backyard once.

4: For a 4 1/2 hour trip how many potty breaks should you give your dog?

5: Gunther doesn't like to poo outside of his backyard...I have waited an hour once when we went to work, walked around giving him the "Go potty" command (I fed him and then we left, no chance to poo in the backyard since we were running late) and he wouldn't go at all... When I say go potty he only piddles... Any tips?

I'm a little nervous about using just a basic tent (it's big enough for all three of us to fit into with lots of room) with all the different noises, but we have "camped" out in the backyard and he LOVED the tent, always wanted to go lay inside. I'm just worried with all the distractions he won't want to relax.

Thank you in advance for any tips or suggestions! Feel free add any info on anything that isn't questioned on this list! :D
 

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Sorry don't have any input. But we're in the same exact situation. Were also planning a camping trip the end of this month and have all the same concerns / questions. I'm planning on taking a long line (25') and one of those screw in the ground anchors for when were just relaxing. Worried he'll see something and go after it..
 

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Ok. Just get him used to the backpack before hand. He can carry his own water and food.

As for the fire, if you find out let me know. My last GSD grabbed a flaming log and took off through the woods with it, to greet sone new comers.

I would bet, if you hike him before hand, he will relax at night. Maybe not this first time, but he will get used to it.


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Ok. Just get him used to the backpack before hand. He can carry his own water and food.

As for the fire, if you find out let me know. My last GSD grabbed a flaming log and took off through the woods with it, to greet sone new comers.

I would bet, if you hike him before hand, he will relax at night. Maybe not this first time, but he will get used to it.


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That would be scary :eek: (in bold)

Thank you and I'll start training him with the backpack (trip won't be until late July or August so I have some time).
 

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for no legitimate reason i can give you, i don't like doggie back packs. there are cloth light weight crates you could try inside the tent, but if he really wanted out it wouldn.t hold him. i have never camped without having a water supply near by. cabelas sells those water purification tabs and containers. if i was really out in the middle of nowhere i would bring 4 x the amt of water i thought i needed.
 

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They have canteens that turn into water bowls for water. I would stop at least once when traveling for 4 hours. We have bon fires all the time and the dogs just stay away from the fire , I still watch carefully. i strongly advise getting little locks for the tent so he can't push the zipper open in the middle of the night if he hears something. I learned this the hard way when camping with my dogs many years ago. The one heard the raccoons walking around the tent and busted out, the other dogs followed. It was 2am and pitch black, I couldn't do anything when they ran into the woods. They all came back by the time it got light out but it was very scary. They can't get out with the locks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They have canteens that turn into water bowls for water. I would stop at least once when traveling for 4 hours. We have bon fires all the time and the dogs just stay away from the fire , I still watch carefully. i strongly advise getting little locks for the tent so he can't push the zipper open in the middle of the night if he hears something. I learned this the hard way when camping with my dogs many years ago. The one heard the raccoons walking around the tent and busted out, the other dogs followed. It was 2am and pitch black, I couldn't do anything when they ran into the woods. They all came back by the time it got light out but it was very scary. They can't get out with the locks.
Would a carabiner work so we're not fumbling with keys in the dark? I'd have to check to see if the zipper tab is even big enough to accommodate the carabiner but it would be an easier thing to clip on and off.
 

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Would a carabiner work so we're not fumbling with keys in the dark? I'd have to check to see if the zipper tab is even big enough to accommodate the carabiner but it would be an easier thing to clip on and off.
It would have to be on the smaller side to fit, but the concept is there.
 

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We have camped with our new GSD our 5 times since he was four months old and he is now 6.5 months so he got used to it early, but we still prepped him with short hikes on trails at home before we left and camper beforehand we left. Our old dog was a 2 year rescue before we got her and took her camping too. They both have done great. We tent camped before with our old dog and she slept in the tent with us no problem. Will all of the excitement, hiking, new things to explore, etc...you will probably have no problems with him being so tired that he will go right to sleep beside you in the tent and be just fine.

You didn't say if you are packing into a remote area, campground, or what but at campgrounds around here (state parks especially), dogs are required to be on a 6 ft leash at all times. We did, however keep a bit of a longer line on ours and no one ever said anything.

For our youngster, we stop every 2 hours for a potty break...make sure we gave him plenty of exercise before we hit the road and he pretty much sleeps the whole way.

When you get there, before you even set up the tent, let him explore the area a bit to let him sniff and get to know the area. We always take one of those big water jugs (like on the sidelines at football games) of clean water plus a few gallon jugs in the back of the truck for extra. We also have a uv light water purifier if we need it.

Backpacks are great for dogs if you are doing long hikes, but what I think is more important are boots. Here, we have cactus and lots of rocks so we use them to protect their paws. We had to turn around once on a trail because there were so many little cactus thorns all over the place. For water, I carry a collapsible water bowl and pour water from my own bottle or camelback bladder for the dog.

For fire, watch the dog like you would a toddler. Keep the dog on a leash and don't leave him unattended. By fire time, our boy usually is exhausted and will just sit by me in my chair while he waits for his hotdog to be done! :). Camping is so fun for our dog and it is the one place we let him eat "table food"...a fried egg, steak, and hot dogs. He loves it!

This year was the first year we have upgraded to a popup camper and we love it, but have always tent camped before. Oh, other tip is to make sure you get a can of bear spray. We had a bear in our camp last year and scared me to death! It went away on its own (we didn't have any food out), but wild animals will know/smell a dog and may be curious. We carry our gun and bear spray. Mountain lion encounters happen here an lot...one came into a camp near Tuscon last year and grabbed a dog and ran off with it! Yikes! Samson heard his first coyote howls last weekend camping, gave a couple of GSD head tilts at me, and went back to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You didn't say if you are packing into a remote area, campground, or what but at campgrounds around here (state parks especially), dogs are required to be on a 6 ft leash at all times. We did, however keep a bit of a longer line on ours and no one ever said anything.
We'll be at a KOA in Winthrop, WA it's a really nice campsite and is pet friendly. I'm going to keep him on his 6' leash just for safe keeping.

We're going with my sister and my brother in law and they're really finicky when it comes to "roughing it" and don't really like to. Took me like two years just to get her to TRY camping and now she likes it but it has to have a gazillion amenities.
 

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At least she is trying! Lol you should have plenty of access to water then! Have fun and let us know how it goes!
 

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Dumb question.. Is the light for him to see or just to know where he's at? Would a smaller glow stick work?
It's for you to see him in the dark...especially if he runs out of the tent like the other poster mentioned. I think a glow stick tied to collar would work for a few hours.
 

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We have a small light that is activated by motion,( the light itself is red) so when Tess is laying down it's not irritating, just flashes when she walks. She's been camping with us since she was 3 months old and loves it. Depending on where we are we have strung a rope between trees and looped a rope over it to give her a little more range. We usually go early enough or late enough in the season that we don't always leash her, no other campers around us.
 

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I have taken all my dogs camping on numerous occasions..including chihuahuas and a puppy. Including drive up sites and canoe in sites.

If we are isolated I leave the GSDs loose and only let the small dogs in the tent.

If we are close to other campers I use a cable tie out for the big dog. If the need to get under cover they will usually crawl under some spruce boughs or a bush. If its a drive in site then bring a crate and the dog can sleep in the car.

For hiking trails GSD is on an E Collar, water is wherever they can find it (dont carry any). Plenty of lakes and rivers around here. I have been toying with making the current dog carrying our water and snacks.

I had the current dog camping at 4 months.

As for keeping up I like the Darwinistic approach. Stragglers get left behind..lol.

Have taken numerous dogs on long 14 hour multi day road trips. When we stop if they dont go...they dont go. (They all go eventually)

Dont worry about it the dog will adapt, its a GSD!


This dog was a fear aggressive mess. Had no issues.



Puppy on a hike. (take it easy on distance if they are young) I tossed her in the lake when she got too hot.



They find water were they can..lol.

 

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Discussion Starter #19
I would be worried about lepto (even with a vax) letting Gunther drink out of puddles/ponds/slow moving water.

Cute pups by the way! :D and as for a solid recall, not so much. That's why he's going to be on a leash at all times.
 

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I would be worried about lepto (even with a vax) letting Gunther drink out of puddles/ponds/slow moving water.

Cute pups by the way! :D and as for a solid recall, not so much. That's why he's going to be on a leash at all times.

Thats why there are shots to prevent it. Risks are pretty low anyways around here. None of those dogs pictured were vaccinated.

Dont bubble wrap the dog! ;)
 
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