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Discussion Starter #1
Hi ya'll! I'm new here and have learned a TON already but I do have a quick question of my own. Felix is CONSTANTLY burping. It's so gross! Do any of you have this issue also and is there anything that I can do to help maybe remedy it? Thanks in advance!
 

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One of Piper's dog park friends, a rough coat collie, burps VERY audibly. Owner hasn't figured out a way to stop them and has quit trying. Piper burps silently on occasion, but she's funny about it. She feels one coming on, walks up to you, looks you squarely in the eye, and gets the little cheek puff and "oh my" look. Haven't figured her out either.
 

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Felix is audible and will wake from a dead sleep, come over and burp in your face and then just look at you like "I burped in your face becasue I love you!"
 

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Nate also burps a lot. It doesn't seem like any certain foods make him burpier than others. He walks up to me like he has something important to say and lets it rip.:confused:
 

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dodger will always burp in my face, not my mom's, mine. I think it's his way of telling me " I love you mom!!!!"
 

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He never really passes gas but he burps like a grown man! Thanks for all the replies!
 

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Just a heads up that this can be an early indicator that your dog could potentially suffer from bloat, it might be worth it to talk to a vet. My boy recently went though emergency surgery for bloat and the Vet asked me if my dog tended to be gassy; he didn't seem to be too gassy to me but the vet said that some dogs carry gas more than other dogs, some dogs have larger stomachs that can fill with gas. When a dog has a lot of gas in their stomach it increases the chances of them getting GDV or bloat.

There are many things you can do to prevent gas to limit the chances of bloat. Some things that can cause excessive air to enter the stomach are; Allowing the dog to eat too fast, its a good idea to invest in a slow feed dish, a dish that the dog has to work around an obstacle like a bump in the middle so that it can't just inhale food in a matter of seconds; Limit the amount of water your dog is drinking during eating, dogs can swallow lots of air when lapping up water, combine that with eating and it can be too much. Also place your dishes on the floor, contrary to some theories, feeding in elevated dishes can cause your dog to get more air in their stomach and it allows them to eat faster which is a cause of gas. And most of all, do not let your dog eat when worked up, allow time for your dog to rest and become relaxed before every meal, and make your dog rest and digest some of his food for an hour before you let him/her go out and play.

I don't want to sound scary but Bloat is a scary thing and someone is never prepared emotionally or financially when bloat occurs because it can kill very quickly, and it can be very expensive to repair. There is a preventative surgery for dogs at risk of bloat that is much safer and less invasive than a bloat correcting surgery. From what the vet said, they can go in with scopes and suture the stomach to the inside of the abdominal wall without having to cut the dog wide open. They do this for dogs at risk of Bloat to essentially make them Bloat proof. Of course after the surgery you would always want to practice safe feeding habits for your dog.

Trust me, I didn't know the real dangers of bloat until it happened to my boy. I will never be uninformed and unprepared for bloat again.
 

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He's probably gulping air when he eats his food--esp. if he's a quick eater. Try slowing him down with a special slow-feed bowl (or if you use the standard no-tip steel bowls, you can flip them upside down and put the food in the ring-part of the bowl so that the dog can't eat quickly).

Also, Prozyme helps with flatulence at the other end, so it might help with burps too.
 

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A co-workers Great Dane (2 yrs old) died of bloat a few months ago. He said one of the questions the vet asked if he burped excessively, which I guess he did. They don't know what causes bloat but we must be aware.

I have heard my boy burp a few times, but not like you describe.

Make sure he's not gulping huge amounts of water and eating his food slow...not inhaling it. No running around at least 35 minutes before or after eating.

Don't mean to freak you out...
 

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I don't think it's excessive. I'd say it happens around 3-5 times a day. I was thinking it was because he does eat fast and pants non-stop. Thanks for all the help!
 

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A co-workers Great Dane (2 yrs old) died of bloat a few months ago. He said one of the questions the vet asked if he burped excessively, which I guess he did. They don't know what causes bloat but we must be aware.

I have heard my boy burp a few times, but not like you describe.

Make sure he's not gulping huge amounts of water and eating his food slow...not inhaling it. No running around at least 35 minutes before or after eating.

Don't mean to freak you out...

Thanks guys for all the good info about bloat! Felix's stomach has been tacked so, in the event that he DOES get bloat, his stomach can't flip.
 

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Just a heads up that this can be an early indicator that your dog could potentially suffer from bloat, it might be worth it to talk to a vet. My boy recently went though emergency surgery for bloat and the Vet asked me if my dog tended to be gassy; he didn't seem to be too gassy to me but the vet said that some dogs carry gas more than other dogs, some dogs have larger stomachs that can fill with gas. When a dog has a lot of gas in their stomach it increases the chances of them getting GDV or bloat.

There are many things you can do to prevent gas to limit the chances of bloat. Some things that can cause excessive air to enter the stomach are; Allowing the dog to eat too fast, its a good idea to invest in a slow feed dish, a dish that the dog has to work around an obstacle like a bump in the middle so that it can't just inhale food in a matter of seconds; Limit the amount of water your dog is drinking during eating, dogs can swallow lots of air when lapping up water, combine that with eating and it can be too much. Also place your dishes on the floor, contrary to some theories, feeding in elevated dishes can cause your dog to get more air in their stomach and it allows them to eat faster which is a cause of gas. And most of all, do not let your dog eat when worked up, allow time for your dog to rest and become relaxed before every meal, and make your dog rest and digest some of his food for an hour before you let him/her go out and play.

I don't want to sound scary but Bloat is a scary thing and someone is never prepared emotionally or financially when bloat occurs because it can kill very quickly, and it can be very expensive to repair. There is a preventative surgery for dogs at risk of bloat that is much safer and less invasive than a bloat correcting surgery. From what the vet said, they can go in with scopes and suture the stomach to the inside of the abdominal wall without having to cut the dog wide open. They do this for dogs at risk of Bloat to essentially make them Bloat proof. Of course after the surgery you would always want to practice safe feeding habits for your dog.

Trust me, I didn't know the real dangers of bloat until it happened to my boy. I will never be uninformed and unprepared for bloat again.
good info, tks for posting.
 

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FWIW Liesl is on a raw diet. She is 1 1/2 years old, and has spent several hours each afternoon and evening inside with us and all night sleeping inside downstairs, every day.

I have known of her to burp only twice, and to pass gas only twice.

I attribute it to the raw diet--feeding her just enough for health but keeping her lean, no veggies in her diet, and minimizing burpy people foods like cheese, fried foods, flour gravy, etc.
 
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