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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I'm new just looking for some advise I want my dog roxy to have a litter but I'm unsure on when the best time is.. Ive been doin some research but all I've been getting is abuse saying if I don't know then I should not breed and get her done but I've been trying to get information about this as I want to do it savely as I would not want any thing to happen to my dog.. Plz help with any info you can thankyou
 

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No hostility or abuse just questions:D

What makes your dog breed worthy?

Does your dog have any titles or been tested by a third party in any venue?

Has your dog been health tested?

Have hip and elbows been checked by OFA?

Does your dog have the pedigree behind her to better the breed?

Are you or do you have a mentor capable of matching a male to your female for a specific outcome?

What outcome are you looking for?

Can you give some type of health guarantee?

Are you capable of either taking the pups back that don't work out and/or giving the buyer there money back?

If you can answer these and there are more I can't think of right now then it will be easier for us to help you get the answers you need.
 

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Let me ask this....

Why do you want to breed her?

I think that is a very important question.

As far as safely? Every time you breed you take a chance on something going wrong. There have been two threads on here in the last few days. One dog that should have gone to the vet and the other that was luckily rushed to the vet. She was saved, puppies weren't.
 

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After she has passed all of her health clearances, including OFA hips and elbows (which can't be done until she is 2 years old).
After she has been trained, preferably titled, in some venue where her temperament has been tested by a qualified, impartial evaluator.
After her structure and physical appearance has been evaluated against the standard by someone with the knowledge and experience to do so.
After you have researched her pedigree, bloodlines and close relatives to find out what they were like and what they produced, particularly with regard to temperament and health. Proper breeding involves not just looking at the dog itself but also at the family history in order to can gain an understanding of what genetics that she may carry and pass along to her offspring, both those she exhibits herself in her own phenotype and those she may carry hidden in her genotype.

Once all of that is accomplished you will have a better understanding of your dog and her gentics, her strengths and weaknesses, and be able to formulate a plan of what you are looking for in a stud dog in terms of what of her traits you would like to retain, what you might like to lessen and others you would want to improve upon or compensate for. This in turn will tell you what traits to look for in a stud dog.

Then of course if after all of that you do breed her, you would need to learn all about the whelping process, care of the bitch and pups, proper raising and socialization of the pups and how to properly screen potential buyers and evaluate the pups for placement in their new homes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
She has all her paper work and is in great health we have her hips check often as I know that its one of the main problems this breed .. She comes from a long line of pedigree and it a kind and loving bitch.. As for the out come of the puppies the will go to family who want and would love them.. I don't some research on the dog to breed her with and I've found a suitable one who is pedigree.. Just unsure how long you wait after a bleed to mate


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If you don't know the basics of a heat cycle and how to time matings, you should not be thinking of breeding anything right now. Take a huge step back, stick around, and learn a few things about the breed and breeding before even considering a litter.

You said hips were done - were they evaluated under OFA or the SV? What were the ratings?
 

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She has all her paper work and is in great health we have her hips check often as I know that its one of the main problems this breed .. She comes from a long line of pedigree and it a kind and loving bitch.. As for the out come of the puppies the will go to family who want and would love them.. I don't some research on the dog to breed her with and I've found a suitable one who is pedigree.. Just unsure how long you wait after a bleed to mate


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Do you actually have the hips and elbows X-rayed and OFA certified? This is different than a vet just feeling them or watching them walk-it's the only way to tell if they have HD or ED. This is an absolute minimum before breeding.
What do you mean a long line of pedigree? What lines is she? Posting her pedigree is a good idea as well as the pedigree of the dog you are looking at, as there are several people on here who are very good at looking at specific lines and what they will produce.

Also, so you have potentially 11-12 or more homes that you know will for sure want one of your puppies?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ofa and she received a good rating! So how are you ment to find out about it not being rude but I'm trying my best to find stuff out thinking everything through but u are fast to say "if you don't know then don't breed" would u rather I didn't ask question n just keep mating till one sticks? I've come on her to help me find out about things so if you not going to help then don't reply please... An by the way how do you find your info out bet you asked someone!


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Also it should be pointed out, that there is a LOT more to ensuring that an individual dog is worthy of breeding, or a good potential mate, than the fact that it is registered and has a pedigree. That's like saying that a person is worthy of breeding just because they spent some time and money on Ancestry.com looking up where they came from. Registered and pedigreed does not equal quality. The only way to know if a dog is worthy of breeding is to first look at the dog and ensure it is an excellent representative of the breed, and then look at the pedigree and ensure that it's ancestors and relatives were as well. That they happend to be registered and have a known ancestry is not sufficient to prove that. You need to know what genetic traits they carried, not just their names and registration numbers.
 

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Having papers does NOT mean the dogs have a good pedigree.

Please don't take any of this as bashing. There is just a lot that goes into breeding. If corners are cutt then all your doing is adding to the over population and ruining this amazing breed.

Look at all the threads on here about fearful or reactive dogs. Those are the 9 out 10 times the results from people breeding dogs that don't have a real understanding of how to do such. I'm not saying don't ever become a breeder. I'm just saying do some research and learn about what it really takes and means to do so.
 

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Roxy, the absolute best way to go about becoming a breeder is to mentor under a good, responsible breeder. If you do that you will have the opportunity to learn all you need to know about breeding the right way, from heat cycle timing on through sending the pups home and everything in between. No one on this board is going to condone breeding being done by someone who doesn't know the basics. There is nothing wrong with not knowing the basics... none of us, including breeders, were born knowing them. We had to learn. But we put in the time upfront to learn first so we were able to make the right decisions when we started breeding. Learning as you go, or learning after the fact, is a huge disservice to the breed and future puppy owners.
 

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Roxy - Where are you located? I"m sure someone here could point you to a group to help you find a mentor and get involved with the breed.
 

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The reason people are telling you these things is that understanding of heat cycles is something that naturally happens when you're around the breed enough to learn all the things that come with planning to breed your bitch. I've been at a breed club for 2 years now and although I don't own a female, I have picked up enough knowledge to know about heat cycles and when the bitch is generally ovulating and should be bred. It's not a question I would ever dream of asking to a stranger on an internet forum. It's also not a question you want to ask a bunch of people that care about keeping a high standard of the breed.

A small involvement in what I like to call the "dog world" would've lead you to understand how people feel about breeding and how the question you just asked screams I shouldn't be doing this. That way, instead of getting on people for assuming things about you that are more than likely true, you'd understand why they're responding in the way that they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've asked a simple question about finding things out!! I have not said any thing about that I'm going to breed her right away I'm just getting advise so stop having digs at me like I'm some terrible owner I willing to take classes to do the best by her she is my main concern


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