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My dog is only 8 months and in her first heat. She is so adorable and good my family wants me to breed her. Possibly next heat but any suggestions? She is a German Shepard/ golden retriever mix. Never have done this before. How do you find a mate? Thanks
 

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I'm terribly sorry, but you won't find much support for breeding a family pet simply because she's adorable on this forum. I have linked some web pages I recommend you read through and I hope that after reading these things, you will be very careful in making your decisions on whether or not the risks outweigh any benefits when you breed as a novice.

Thinking of Breeding Your Dog? Questions to Ask Yourself

Dog Owner's Guide: Should you breed your dog?

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/breeding-for-pet-owners-the-pros-and-cons-of-breeding-dogs (this one pushes a spay/neuter, which I don't necessarily agree with)
 

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There are thousands of great dog in shelters all around the country that are already born and need a home. My advice would be to not breed your dog, and for your relatives or friends to help one of those!
 

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right now our local tv station is running teasers about the shelters overflowing with pets who are goign to be put to sleep.....please don't add to the problem by breeding a mixed breed female and giving away pups or selling them cheaply .....lots of dogs with nice personalities being put to death every day


Lee
 

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I agree with others saying you should not breed your dog. But, as people are wont to do as they please, if you do breed her, please have her hips and elbows xrayed at the very least, and wait until she is at the very youngest 2 years old. Be prepared for things to go wrong, such as your girl needing a c-section, losing puppies, losing your girl, etc. So much can go wrong...
 

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My dog is only 8 months and in her first heat. She is so adorable and good my family wants me to breed her. Possibly next heat but any suggestions? She is a German Shepard/ golden retriever mix. Never have done this before. How do you find a mate? Thanks
I'm all for responsible breeding but this isn't it.

A good breeder is knowledgeable in their breed. A good breeder health tests their prospective breeding stock according to what's needed given their breed. A good breeder proves their breeding dogs in some arena, be it conformation, performance, or both, demonstrating that the dogs are good exemplars of their breed and able to fulfill their intended purpose.

Breeding mixes tends not to fall into that category. I would hope nobody would support what you propose doing.

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all of the above AND the particular combination of your dog , if it is even correct , defies good sense if someone went out of their way to use these two polar opposite breeds to create a "designer" dog -- or someone's attempt to make a GSD friendlier .

one breed is by breed standard aloof , with aggression and guarding .
the other breed is a wear-your-heart on the sleeve , super friendly dog with no guarding , no aggression.

golden retrievers have a high incidence of orthopedic problems and are placed high in the cancer risk group

neither breed represented would have been a member of the best of the best - so wild card when it comes to the genetic background and attempts to eliminate these problems , which may become evident with your dog (hope not) or be expressed in the next generation.

no responsible GSD breeder would offer a good stud to your pup -

just enjoy your pup --
 

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There is so much you can do with your girl. Train her, take her to shows and title her in Rally, Obedience, Agility, Flyball, Herding, Nosework. Get her CGC, get advanced CGC, put a therapy dog on her, and go take her to hospitals, or libraries and help people with her. Teach her to hunt. The possibilities are endless.

If breeding is something you want to do, than while you are training your bitch, determine which of her traits are from which breed, and find which will be best for you. All of what you do with the mix, will be good experience for when you are ready to breed responsibly.

75% of the dogs in shelters are mixes. What this means is that when your bitch presents you with a healthy litter of 12 to 14 puppies, your relatives and friends fade into the woodwork and then you have to find homes for these puppies. And you are condemning them to the bottom of the barrel when it comes to owners. Yes, yes, there are folks here that have dogs they did not pay for, and they treat them as well as pups that were given 1500-2500 for. But they are the cream of the crop. A lot of folks, think easy come, easy go, and when the pup becomes an adolescent nuisance, or they have to move, if they did not pay for the puppy, a lot of them will not call you. They will just dump the dog at a shelter, and the dog could be dead before they leave the parking lot. Or they will drop the dog in the woods somewhere. The thing is, the costs are about the same to produce a mongrel than to produce pure-bred puppies. The work and time involved is the same, if you do it right.

Really, think about doing this. About not doing this. Have fun with this one, and learn from her. Then you will know what to look for when you go to buy a breeding prospect.
 

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Not ganging up on you (cause that ticks me off):smile2:---I understand what it's like to have the best dog in the world and to want to pass those great traits on-- that said---Please Don't. There are just way too many dogs begging or literally dying in shelters for a good home. The members here have offered really great advice. Please Please reconsider breeding. Have your family and friends go check out some local shelters--they'll make a puppy or adult dog very happy !
 

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OP, I think it helps to look down the road: what kind of lives will the mixed-breed pups you breed have? You are imagining finding them great homes. What if some of those homes end up being not so great -- abusive, neglectful, etc.? That's on you. What if one of them come out with diseases or deformities and can't find a home? That's on you too.

Good breeders make a promise to their pups when they're born that they'll always have a safety net, so they'll never end up unwanted in a shelter. That means being willing to take back whatever you bred for life if a placement doesn't work.

Amateur placements tend to be hit and miss, for several reasons. One is that it takes a lot of experience to read people and figure out whether they've got what it takes to successfully raise a puppy. Good intentions aren't enough. Also, experienced owners often aren't looking for dogs with back-yard breeders -- so most of your buyers will be newbies who need lots and lots of support (and they'll call you at all hours asking for advice). Sometimes cutting corners happens due to lack of interested buyers, once the pups are 16 or even 20 weeks, and need to be gone. Even in rescue, where we have years of experience and are very careful, we get dogs we adopted out as youngsters back as seniors! One we adopted out years ago just came back to me as a NINE YEAR OLD dog, because her owner now has health problems and can't care for her.

If you aren't into a 12-14 year commitment to have dogs dropped back in your lap whenever people feel like it, the alternative is to wash your hands of what happens to them, knowing some of them may end up being put to sleep in a shelter, terribly afraid in a cold, concrete room, among strangers who don't love them. That's immoral, as far as I'm concerned, and not something anyone who truly cares about dogs would choose for the pups they bred.
 

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Nearly every breeder who has bred purebred dogs with impeccable pedigrees will tell you about a dog being returned for the stupidest reasons. Most common ones are 'we're having a baby' or 'we're moving', or 'it sheds too much'.

If this happens to breeders who sell their pups for big bucks (most purebred puppies cost around $2,000) you can just imagine what may happen with mixed breed puppies that are sold or given away. People don't do their homework when adopting a dog, and often look at it as something disposable, to be gotten rid of when it becomes an inconvenience. They will even out and out LIE.

I know a breeder who breeds working dog, some of which go to the police and military. A man took two of her pups from the one litter, saying he had a nice house and nice big yard, and making all sorts of promises about what he was going to train the dogs for (probably schutzhund).

She got a call a few months later, asking her to come and get the dogs because the owner had been arrested. They were crated in an apartment that was so cluttered you had to turn sideways to get down the corridors. They obviously were kept in the crates for nearly the whole day, and the one dog's pasterns were so weak from lack of exercise that they were almost touching the floor!

Please, don't do it.
 

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Not ganging up on you (cause that ticks me off):smile2:---I understand what it's like to have the best dog in the world and to want to pass those great traits on-- that said---Please Don't. There are just way too many dogs begging or literally dying in shelters for a good home. The members here have offered really great advice. Please Please reconsider breeding. Have your family and friends go check out some local shelters--they'll make a puppy or adult dog very happy !
Or encourage them to find ethical breeders. Either way. A responsible breeder or responsible rescue is a great option.
 

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Let me tell you a story about Jack and Mindy. Jack an Mindy were half-grown mutt puppies. They landed in a shelter and room-mates Mark and Linda brought them out of the shelter to live in their apartment.

Mark and Linda were an odd couple, she was old enough to be his mom, and had a daughter around his age. Mark was a young adult. But even with some maturity in the arrangement, they brought two dogs to a place that did not allow dogs. So of course, they could not allow the dogs outside. Ever.

The rule was, whoever sees the poop first is supposed to clean it up. This is a true story. Both of them could avoid a pile and not "see" it. It was disgusting. They would lock the dogs in the bathroom if both were out. The dogs ate the bathroom.

Finally the arrangement soured, and there would be no deposit returned because of all the damage. Both parties moved out, and Jack and Mindy were dumped back at the shelter, for someone else to house train, now after months and months of using living quarters as a toilet. Or, they were killed.

I would love to think that Mark and Linda were rare. Unfortunately, I don't believe it. People are so selfish these days...
 

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Let me tell you a story about Jack and Mindy. Jack an Mindy were half-grown mutt puppies. They landed in a shelter and room-mates Mark and Linda brought them out of the shelter to live in their apartment.

Mark and Linda were an odd couple, she was old enough to be his mom, and had a daughter around his age. Mark was a young adult. But even with some maturity in the arrangement, they brought two dogs to a place that did not allow dogs. So of course, they could not allow the dogs outside. Ever.

The rule was, whoever sees the poop first is supposed to clean it up. This is a true story. Both of them could avoid a pile and not "see" it. It was disgusting. They would lock the dogs in the bathroom if both were out. The dogs ate the bathroom.

Finally the arrangement soured, and there would be no deposit returned because of all the damage. Both parties moved out, and Jack and Mindy were dumped back at the shelter, for someone else to house train, now after months and months of using living quarters as a toilet. Or, they were killed.

I would love to think that Mark and Linda were rare. Unfortunately, I don't believe it. People are so selfish these days...
HOLY COW. That's awful! And my head is exploding trying to imagine that.

Did you know Mark and Linda? Like went to their apartment and saw this? I can't wrap my head around that kind of neglect.

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Yes. I knew them. I was there at the apartment, once was enough. The man grew up. He had a GSD that lasted to be 13 years. And he took care of her, and his cats. I don't know about the woman.
 

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Breeding carries so much risk and potential heartbreak- if you truly care about the pups. One thing people don't mention often is that roughly 20% of pups born die young (under 10 weeks). Disease, birth defects, etc. And getting a pup back is fairly common. I microchip all pups in my name first, so that if they were to ever end up at a shelter, or lost, they'd be traced back to me. The last thing I want is a great working dog to fail the shelter temperament test and be euthanized (not uncommon).

Not every responsible breeder has to title their bitch. Plenty don't. However, every responsible breeder completes the health tests for the breed, knows their bitch and her pedigree, and carefully selects a health-tested, titled, proven stud. If your female is not high quality, from good bloodlines, with working ability, most stud dog owners will not allow their dog to breed with her.

You also should brucellosis test both dog and bitch every six months. That costs me roughly $100 each time, it may be cheaper in other areas, I haven't checked. I use OFA hip/elbows, the x-rays and screening cost me about $450. Titling, training, veterinary, are also a pretty penny. Stud fee (generally cost of a pup, or a pup back to stud owner), runs roughly $1,000 or more.

If you do it right, breeding is a lot of work but so worth it if you are dedicated to your breed and have a bitch that is breed worthy and will contribute to the bloodlines. But it is not cheap, and you might not swing a profit at all, or even break even. I do not think making a profit from breeding dogs is a bad thing at all- after all you put in a lot of time and investment- but do not expect to get rich from breeding, generally, unless you are doing it wrong.

I would not breed a GSD/Golden mix even if she passed the health test and had great temperament. I think retrievers and GSD (herding breeds for protection types) do not mix well and you are sacrificing nerve and could end up with some extremely skittish, fearful, biters in the pups.
 

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Nearly every breeder who has bred purebred dogs with impeccable pedigrees will tell you about a dog being returned for the stupidest reasons. Most common ones are 'we're having a baby' or 'we're moving', or 'it sheds too much'.
Worst one I ever heard was the Dal that was dropped at a shelter because "we redecorated and he doesn't match the furniture anymore"
 

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Yes. I knew them. I was there at the apartment, once was enough. The man grew up. He had a GSD that lasted to be 13 years. And he took care of her, and his cats. I don't know about the woman.
I'm glad the man redeemed himself. Once would definitely be enough for that apartment.

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