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Well stated WolfyDog.

Though I think there are some minimum standards which most could agree on, the rest is very subjective and really open to free market influences.
 

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If the OP isn't just a whelp wanting to stir the pot, then he has gotten his answer and is long gone.

8 years old is not too old to produce a litter, but having a first litter at 8 is way too risky. The problem is, that she can and probably WILL get pregnant if she is given the opportunity.

It is then, that you have to decide whether to spay abort, or try to let her go through with it. And the chances of complications skyrocket after the age of 5 or 6 for first-time litters. A large-breed bitch is closing into geriatric at this point, and the chances that she will not have the required stamina to produce a litter, the chances are very good that it will be very small, meaning much larger puppies, labor may not start, my start and stop, and she may not be able to push the large pups out.

Possible C-section. Will the instincts of motherhood kick in as strongly in an older bitch? Maybe. If she did not have them naturally? Maybe. Will she bounce back from a c-section? Maybe -- lots of maybes.

What you have to really ask yourself is whether you have the stamina to raise a litter if the bitch rejects them or is lost in the process. If you are ok with that, well, no one here is going to condone what you are doing. Read up on the process and pay special attention to when to call in the vet and get your bitch help if she is having trouble.
 

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Then it depends on the bitch and her current health.

I got a litter of seven out of Jenna 11 months ago. She will be 10 in August. She delivered naturally, and had no problems. Her previous litter turned 2 January 29. She is an excellent dam and has never had a still born pup, nor has she lost one after birth.

She is retired now, only because she is 9.5 years.

It will depend on your bitch.

If she hasn't had a litter for a number of years, that also can be an issue, like, if she had a litter at 2 and 3 and now 5 years later you want a last litter out of her, that would be harder on her than if she had a litter each year. Also could be tougher for her to conceive.
 

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How does one become reputable if the breeding is only left to the established reputable breeders? Are new people never allowed to breed?
i would think a starting a kennel/breeding program requires a bit of thought, some basic knowledge along with a basic plan. any one can get a male and female and bingo puppies will happen. what does he know about his females pedigree ? what parameters will be used when selecting the male? what traits is he looking for? is the op prepared to take back the pups if things go wrong? with the little info we have about the op, it is hard to advise this person.
 

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Phrases like these have become cliches over time and don't mean anything and it feels like people are copying them without really knowing what it means. There is not a definite standard for "reputable" because it is subjective.

If we would only go to experienced breeders, we will lose the breed in the next few (human) generations.
you are correct of course, but i would think there is a minimum amount of knowledge required before one intentionally breeds a dog. otherwise we should just start supporting the local pet shop.
 

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i would think a starting a kennel/breeding program requires a bit of thought, some basic knowledge along with a basic plan. any one can get a male and female and bingo puppies will happen. what does he know about his females pedigree ? what parameters will be used when selecting the male? what traits is he looking for? is the op prepared to take back the pups if things go wrong? with the little info we have about the op, it is hard to advise this person.
But then why not ask those questions?

Instead, someone who has just as much limited experience with the breed, absolutely no experience breeding dogs, doesn't have any idea what titling a dog means, and probably has never discussed with a real life breeder what they take into consideration when they're breeding dogs, makes a statement about what someone else should do when they're breeding dogs? "Leave it to the professionals." It's just not necessary to even make that statement in the first place.

Look at yourself in the mirror first before telling others what they should be doing with their dogs, especially when you have extremely limited information coming from a short post on the internet.
 

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She had puppies last year and she looks great. I think I will breed her in the next 2-3 months.
If you are really firm on this decision I would get a really good vet check done, complete with blood work to make sure she is able to deliver a healthy litter. Tell your vet that you have a planned breeding so he/she will look for the appropriate things. I assume you have done your homework on hips, etc for the sire you have planned. Eight is no longer a young dog so be prepared to help with the litter, possibly bottle feeding, cleaning the pups, etc. She may need more help as the pups get older too as she will get tired of being pulled at and nipped by those sharp little puppy teeth. It isn't an easy job but if you know what you are looking at going into it then you will be more prepared.
 

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If I were to breed my dog, I would only do so after all the health checks and with the consent of her breeder, let him find the match and go from there under his supervision. By then I will be a new breeder with knowledge on how to raise good pups (physically and mentally sound), which would mean to me "reputable", even though it would be my first bred litter.
 

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If the health checks are clear and you are going to breed her- it is a good idea to notify your vet of possible c-section as a backup plan if there are any complications. Make sure your vet or a vet will be around in the days close to her due date- in case if needed you will know where to go.
 

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Even for an older bitch, it is better not to need a c-section. I think I would just wait until day 56 or so and get an x-ray to ensure that we have a regular sized litter, not just one or two huge puppies. Also having an accurate count of the pups in there, can help you know whether or not she is done. When they are older, they may get tired out sooner, and if a pup doesn't show up, that can be fatal. Also, I would make sure the gal gets regular exercise, and plenty of healthy food to give her the stamina she will need to get through whelping.

Keep vanilla ice cream, carnation condensed milk on hand to give her a boost in the middle of the process, maybe a couple of boosts.

Good luck. Hope all goes well.
 

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This is super ridiculous, I mean... OP why? Like why do you want to breed an 8 year old dog? What is your purpose? What is it like is it the money? Is it because she is some super spectacular show or protection sport champion that you feel the need to pass down her genes? Everyone else, can shut it. I don't want anyone else's responses, I just want to hear from the OP. That's all. OP: Dogs shouldn't have to go through all of this for our pleasure or our finances. Dogs never asked to be forced to be bred at 8 years old. I doubt she wants this. How about just love her and care for her in her old age and let her be. Darnn!
 

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If she's been bred before, it's a different scenario than breeding for the very first time at that age, but still not sure why the OP would come here and ask. If you're going to do it and you think it's fine, then why ask. I've seen and heard of dogs bred even older and been OK, but they were already experienced brood bitches being bred by very experienced breeders (experienced as in having bred or helped whelp dozens of litters, seen just about everything there is to see and know what to do when things go wrong and how to recognize trouble). It's not a black and white thing, but the decision depends on way more than just a general question/vague information so I'm guessing the majority of this board are going to err on the side of caution and say no.
 

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This is super ridiculous, I mean... OP why? Like why do you want to breed an 8 year old dog? What is your purpose? What is it like is it the money? Is it because she is some super spectacular show or protection sport champion that you feel the need to pass down her genes? Everyone else, can shut it. I don't want anyone else's responses, I just want to hear from the OP. That's all. OP: Dogs shouldn't have to go through all of this for our pleasure or our finances. Dogs never asked to be forced to be bred at 8 years old. I doubt she wants this. How about just love her and care for her in her old age and let her be. Darnn!

Actually, assuming she's still going into heat, that's nature saying "breed me." If the dog didn't want to be bred, she wouldn't go into heat.

You seem to know a lot about how this dog feels without actually meeting her.
 

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This is super ridiculous, I mean... OP why? Like why do you want to breed an 8 year old dog? What is your purpose? What is it like is it the money? Is it because she is some super spectacular show or protection sport champion that you feel the need to pass down her genes? Everyone else, can shut it. I don't want anyone else's responses, I just want to hear from the OP. That's all. OP: Dogs shouldn't have to go through all of this for our pleasure or our finances. Dogs never asked to be forced to be bred at 8 years old. I doubt she wants this. How about just love her and care for her in her old age and let her be. Darnn!

Whether or not you want our responses, you are going to get them, this is the nature of posting on a forum. If you just want to have the OP respond, send a PM, and from your tone, I doubt it will be answered.

What do you really know about it? Are you a breeder? Do you know how much some bitches truly LOVE to mother their puppies? Do you know? Have you been there? Have you bred an eight year old bitch and found she had trouble with it? Do you know that bitches are just as eager to be bred as dogs are to mate with them? Do you know? What do you know really? Are you a breeder? Because if you aren't then you really don't know what a healthy eight year old bitch is capable of in that area.

Jenna is 9.5 years old in April. I have chosen not to breed her again. Her puppies are a year old in April. She is still happy to share everything with the two young bitches. She is a super mother and it is hard to not breed her because of how much actual enjoyment she gets with her puppies. She loves young pups. If I ever had a orphaned litter, I would use her even if she could not provide milk for them.

I have heard of a ten year old bitch who had 10 healthy puppies. This is NOT like a 70 year old lady having a 10 pound baby. It is not comparable. 63 days of pregnancy is not comparable to 9 months. 2 months of taking care of the babies is not comparable to 2-30 years of taking care of them. We freak out because the only comparison we have is with humans, but dogs have none of the stress that humans go through. They have stress and whelping a litter can be stressful, but it just isn't in comparison to what humans go through to have babies. It is comparing apples to oranges and as my pre-cal/trig teach drummed into our heads so many years ago, ya just can't do that.
 

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My female's dam was 8 when she had her last litter. 8 puppies and a healthy delivery.
Ummm...I think we were ordered to "shut it". Rebel! :cool:
 
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