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Okay so here's the deal.

I've been researching different lines for almost 2 years, I haven't owned a Shepherd in about 5 years, and she lived until she was eleven. She was a beautiful Sable girl, and we got her for around 900. Her hips were in good shape, she was healthy, happy and was ultimately everything you could ask for in a dog. She was also a working line. But because it was so long ago, I don't have the info for the breeder (if she is still even in business).

All the breeders I see, are going between 1200-5000+ for a working line puppy. I know this is the running norm, and I don't really have 1200+ Dollars laying around to dish out right this moment. Are there any breeders you can suggest that have lower prices? I know you pay for what you get, and that's usually a good quality dog, but is it just me, or does the price for quality seem to be skyrocketing nowadays? Yes, I'll probably get a lot of flak for this post, but oh well. Or what about breeders that do contracted payment plans? Believe me, I have no problem affording medical care/food/training ect- I simply do not have the big chunk of change sitting around to ship off to a puppy right now (Not to mention shipping if I go out of state)

What this dog would be for is Schutzhund, Or Search and Rescue, or whatever it's little working brain inspired.

Thanks for your help!
 

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Yes, you can find working line pups for less than the $1200 range, though it will require a lot more research and possibly compromise on qualifications of the breeding dogs (one parent not titled, for example) to find comparable quality.

I'm not sure that would really qualify as skyrocketing though. You said you paid $900 for your previous girl, who lived until 11 and that was 5 years ago, so a total of 16 years. Prices going up from $900 to $1200 in that timeframe isn't unreasonable, especially when one considers that the price of everything else from dog food to vetting to trial entries to training costs to gas to get to training and trial to stud fees to travel costs to get the bitch to the stud to all the other costs that a breeder must incur to prove their breeding stock and then produce a litter of pups has also increased dramatically in that much time.

Many breeders will do payments. They don't advertise as such, but are willing to work with an owner to get a pup in the right home so it certainly never hurts to ask. I also know of some breeders who will offer pups at lower prices if the buyer is willing to forego the health warranty, or offer pups cheaper on limited registration vs higher priced with full registration (something I personally don't agree with, but a lot do it), so those may be options as well.
 

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I think you can find a good working line dog for certainly less than 5000. I'd say anywhere from 12-2000 would be ballpark.

My suggestion, stash away whatever you can afford each week 'towards' a good dog. Since you've been researching, while you still research, you could be putting money aside for purchase price. It doesn't sound like you would be getting a puppy tomorrow, so start saving:)

Also, if there's a breeder your interested in and want to go with, see if you can come to some agreement, send them xx amount of money each month towards a future litter.

50 bucks a week = 200 bucks a month = 1400 bucks in 7 months:)

Everything goes up except our paychecks:( Good luck with your search.
 

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Yes, you can find working line pups for less than the $1200 range, though it will require a lot more research and possibly compromise on qualifications of the breeding dogs (one parent not titled, for example) to find comparable quality.

I'm not sure that would really qualify as skyrocketing though. You said you paid $900 for your previous girl, who lived until 11 and that was 5 years ago, so a total of 16 years. Prices going up from $900 to $1200 in that timeframe isn't unreasonable, especially when one considers that the price of everything else from dog food to vetting to trial entries to training costs to gas to get to training and trial to stud fees to travel costs to get the bitch to the stud to all the other costs that a breeder must incur to prove their breeding stock and then produce a litter of pups has also increased dramatically in that much time.

Many breeders will do payments. They don't advertise as such, but are willing to work with an owner to get a pup in the right home so it certainly never hurts to ask. I also know of some breeders who will offer pups at lower prices if the buyer is willing to forego the health warranty, or offer pups cheaper on limited registration vs higher priced with full registration (something I personally don't agree with, but a lot do it), so those may be options as well.

Thanks for the info! Could you suggest some breeders to start looking at? I know I'm not ready for a Puppy "Right now". But I know once I'm settled into my house I will be (Probably Early January)
 

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I started looking for a pup about four years ago and the price is still the same today as it was then for a good one: $1500. There are a few of the very large kennels with big names that charge huge prices, but most charge about the same.
 

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I don't really have 1200+ Dollars laying around to dish out right this moment. Believe me, I have no problem affording medical care/food/training ect- I simply do not have the big chunk of change sitting around to ship off to a puppy right now (Not to mention shipping if I go out of state)
I guess I'll be the one to say it...but if $1200 is an issue at any 1 time, IMO, it's not financially a good decision to own a dog (nor for the dog's life imo). I am a noobie at GSDs, but my career is in finance. What will you do when you need to pay for an expensive procedure should it need emergency care?

Think of it another way: if someone you knew said they wanted to buy a house and could afford the $1500 a month mortgage payment but didn't have enough for a down payment, would you still advise them to buy the house?

I would wait a bit (it should only take a few months to a year) to save up a bit more and build a cushion. If the dog will cost $1500, I would think having $3K to start would be a minimum reserve (at least $1500 for "in-case" items) and food/routine medical/training would come out your job paycheck.
 

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Think of it another way: if someone you knew said they wanted to buy a house and could afford the $1500 a month mortgage payment but didn't have enough for a down payment, would you still advise them to buy the house?
Obviously. Bank of America did it millions of times, and look how well that turned out! :D
 

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If you aren't planning on getting a pup right away, while you research breeders start socking away $$. Thats what I did and had the down payment when the litter was confirmed to hold my reservation. By the time the litter was ready to go home I had all the $ and then some for toys and vetting. The initial cost of a pup is nothing compared to training, vet, supplies, food etc...
And I'd rather support a good breeder who charges what the pup is worth than a breeder who cuts corners.
 

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I guess I'll be the one to say it...but if $1200 is an issue at any 1 time, IMO, it's not financially a good decision to own a dog (nor for the dog's life imo). I am a noobie at GSDs, but my career is in finance. What will you do when you need to pay for an expensive procedure should it need emergency care?

Think of it another way: if someone you knew said they wanted to buy a house and could afford the $1500 a month mortgage payment but didn't have enough for a down payment, would you still advise them to buy the house?

I would wait a bit (it should only take a few months to a year) to save up a bit more and build a cushion. If the dog will cost $1500, I would think having $3K to start would be a minimum reserve (at least $1500 for "in-case" items) and food/routine medical/training would come out your job paycheck.
I completely agree with this.

Save until you can afford the dog AND a nice doggie emergency fund.

Plus make sure that you have enough cushion in your budget once you get the dog to afford (IMO at least) a couple to few hundred dollars in care. Between the necessities like food and supplements to the extras like toys and training classes...it seems to be about that each month. I've gotten a bit lazy with my budgeting as we have a set amount for her needs and then an "extra" mom and dad fund...but most of it seems to go to Elsa's stuff.
 

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I guess I'll be the one to say it...but if $1200 is an issue at any 1 time, IMO, it's not financially a good decision to own a dog (nor for the dog's life imo). I am a noobie at GSDs, but my career is in finance. What will you do when you need to pay for an expensive procedure should it need emergency care?

Think of it another way: if someone you knew said they wanted to buy a house and could afford the $1500 a month mortgage payment but didn't have enough for a down payment, would you still advise them to buy the house?

I would wait a bit (it should only take a few months to a year) to save up a bit more and build a cushion. If the dog will cost $1500, I would think having $3K to start would be a minimum reserve (at least $1500 for "in-case" items) and food/routine medical/training would come out your job paycheck.
...I suppose I didn't make myself clear, and might I add- just because someone doesn't have 1200+ dollars to pass over, doesn't mean that they don't have it. I'll clarify:

As far as medical/emergency costs go, since I've owned my "own" dog, I've always had Medical/Emergency funds saved. I budget for that one specific thing very carefully as I've had dogs in the past undergo major medical issues (Cancer, Luxating Patella, Torn ACLs the list goes on (The Majority were Rescues) So Yes, I DO have the money, but that is in my Emergency Medical Fund. Every Paycheck, a little bit gets taken out to go towards the EM fund.... So, I really don't think it's a fair judgement to automatically say "if you can't do X amount, you obviously shouldn't have a dog, because then obviously you won't be able to afford X amount in case of a Medical Emergency"...., But- I can see where it's coming from.
 

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The if you have a comfortable EF, put enough money aside til you can afford that great $1200-$1500 WL dog.
 

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...I suppose I didn't make myself clear, and might I add- just because someone doesn't have 1200+ dollars to pass over, doesn't mean that they don't have it. I'll clarify:

As far as medical/emergency costs go, since I've owned my "own" dog, I've always had Medical/Emergency funds saved. I budget for that one specific thing very carefully as I've had dogs in the past undergo major medical issues (Cancer, Luxating Patella, Torn ACLs the list goes on (The Majority were Rescues) So Yes, I DO have the money, but that is in my Emergency Medical Fund. Every Paycheck, a little bit gets taken out to go towards the EM fund.... So, I really don't think it's a fair judgement to automatically say "if you can't do X amount, you obviously shouldn't have a dog, because then obviously you won't be able to afford X amount in case of a Medical Emergency"...., But- I can see where it's coming from.
I suppose what I am suggesting is that the money for the dog and medical/emergency be in 1 fund, and then routine checkups, food, training, supplies, comes from a little bit out of each paycheck since those costs are on-going. It might end up working out that the time it takes you to build some funds, equals the waiting list time from your breeder anyway :hug:
 

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Yep, puppy price is only a drop in the bucket.. last visit to the vet cost me $700
 

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I wouldn't choose a breeder because they accept a payment plan.
Look at breeders whose lines you are interested in, develop a relationship w/ one or two you really would like a pup from and then when they trust you, they may do the payment plan.
I'd rather just make payments to my account and when I have the full amount go forward with reserving a pup after I've done my research.
 

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Yes you can find good pups ranging from $1,200 - $2,000. They vary from breeder to breeder, but to pay $5,000 for a pup is quite high
 

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I would agree that is a reasonable acceptable range, for a true working line GSD pup. ($1200-$2000) My GSD was $1500, plus shipping way back in 2001, as a pup. I'll be breeding my bitch Baghira soon, to a male that will cost quite a bit in up front costs (frozen semen, repro costs), as well as time, effort, and other expenses to raise the litter properly. I would certainly personally pay a premium price for a dog from a superior breeding, particularly for a true working dog candidate. This is one area where homework is necessary, and crucial choices need to be made to get the best dog you can, with the greatest propensity for possessing the behaviors desired in a working pup. More money does not always equal a better dog. Look at some of these jokers out there charging extravagant prices for dogs (pups or adults) looking for people that do not know any better, usually through no fault of their own- merely that some people just don't know good from bad..not their fault...just a lack of knowledge and experience.

* Agreed on the emergency fund..dogs can be costly. Cost me $1500 to remove part of a Kong from my guy's stomach. You never know what is going to crop up.
 
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