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It's been a bit since I last posted last, but would love some outside input on this and have always gotten helpful advice here! My SO and I have been talking about possibly getting a second dog in the next year or so. We were thinking about starting to look for one last year but had to put it off due to life constraints that came up. I have been thinking about which breed would best fit into our life and preferences. I love GSDs and my girl is everything, but I am also drawn to several other breeds as well. That being said, I know much more about GSDs than other breeds and am much more comfortable and now experienced with this breed and know what to generally expect comparatively. Hence why I'm here!
Could anyone give input into whether these breeds would fit/mesh well with what I'm looking for or things to consider? If not, have any good suggestions on some breeds to look into? Or should I stick to GSDs? I've done some research into these breeds and have really liked all 3 thus far.
- Standard poodle (my boyfriend's soft 1st choice)
- Australian shepherd (also WL vs SL?)
- Samoyed

Additional info:
I currently have a female WGSL GSD (55 lb/22 in) who is going on 4 years old in February. I would describe her as mid energy/med drive. She is not aggressive with other dogs, but does sometimes get quite excitable and has rude/intense dog manners so frequently other dogs find her obnoxious and/or intimidating. In terms of play style, she got along swimmingly with a friend's much larger GSD (100+ lb) and they both chased, nipped at, and herded each other and he was not intimidated by her. She also had a fun time with a family friend's younger Australian Shepherd who tolerated her antics and let her chase her around and vice versa. In contrast, the dog she most often interacts with (2-3 times per year for varying number of days or weeks) is an 8 y.o. female flat coated retriever who is essentially a rock... very patient and essentially ignores Winnie as she very annoyingly hovers, orbits, and herds her. Winnie finds this very frustrating and whines and nips at her face to try to get her to engage. I also have an inside cat who Winnie loves to play with when he lets her and she is generally quite good with him (if not sometimes a nuisance).

Must haves:
- Won't attack or kill my cat
- Gets along with odd GSD playstyle/energy
- Medium to large size dog (preferably around her size of 55lb or larger)
- Velcro (aloof to other people is perfectly fine) - friendly with family
- Smart/at least semi trainable

Preferences:
- Prefer something that I can let off leash when hiking
- Off switch
- SSA (I do like females better than males, but this is not required)

Prefer not:
- Small dogs (they all seem to hate Winnie... will bark, growl, and lunge at her from across the street)
- Retrievers are not my favorite
- Stranger aggression (I have friends/family over frequently and live in an urban environment) - aloofness is fine!
- DA
- Excessive howling/barking
- Separation anxiety

Does not matter as much:
- Grooming (I do love fluffy though)/Coat type (don't really prefer wire)
- Friendliness toward strangers
- Energy level (maybe not crazy hyper or literal couch cushion)

TLDR: I am thinking about getting another dog and am interested in opinions on good breed fit
 

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I have a few thoughts for you.
Samoyeds along with other northern breeds are not biddable/trainable like the herding breeds,not usually good with cats either.Run,hunt,dig,run some more.Friendly with people and dogs though.

An Aussie,collie,or English Shepherd would be a good choice.

I know nothing about Standard Poodles:)
 

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Standard poodles are hunting dogs. They truly surprise many people with their tenacity. They are very trainable/bidable, and CAN be good with cats. But they do tend to be a bit edgy in that, they won't hesitate to respond quickly to any unwanted or unwarranted aggression from another dog, or any animal for that matter!

I like them alot, but research the breed a bit if you're thinking about getting one, so you know what you're signing up for!
 

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Spoos are a favorite of mine, of the three breeds you listed the only one I personally would own. As Tim said do your research.
I know you said you weren't big on retrievers, but have you looked at Chessies? Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. Not generally a retriever person myself, but Chessies are different. I owned one, would own another and they are nothing like a Lab or a Golden.
 

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Spoos are a favorite of mine, of the three breeds you listed the only one I personally would own. As Tim said do your research.
I know you said you weren't big on retrievers, but have you looked at Chessies? Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. Not generally a retriever person myself, but Chessies are different. I owned one, would own another and they are nothing like a Lab or a Golden.
Wow! Absolutely agree with that observation. In another thread that was asking if not a GSD, what would your next breed be? For me it WOULD be a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. I've had the pleasure of knowing several, and they were all very solid, stable, sensible dogs!
 

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Three for three: I love Chessies and Standard Poodles. Again though, do your research. Chessies (at least the ones I've met around here) can be stubborn and independent, with some DA. Not unlike more than a few GSDs, frankly but very different than SP. Standards are one of my favorite breeds: very intelligent, biddible (well, compared to sighthounds. lol), protective (don't let the fluff fool you) and tightly bonded with their people. I've always wanted one but draw the line at that much grooming. lol. I've recommended them as a first dog to several first timers with great success. Bonus is that compared to many breeds (including our beloved GSDs) Chessies and Standards have fewer genetic (and other) diseases.

My suggestion would be to suss out all breed dog shows in your area, find out if/when the bench section is open and go talk to the breeders/handlers about the breeds that interest you. You get to see them "up close and personal," at a time when the breeder/handlers aren't pressured (never approach anyone when they're heading toward a class!) and see what you think. You might score an invitation to visit a kennel which will let you do more research on the breeds, as well.
 

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The one thing to watch out for with poodles is the tendency for fearfulness/shyness. The poodles I’ve been around have been shy, not just aloof, and they bark CONSTANTLY. You’d want to make sure to get one from a great breeder that really knows their lines. Otherwise they’re intelligent, highly trainable, lots of energy, nice dogs. I agree with doing more research and meeting more dogs if you can!
 

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The one thing to watch out for with poodles is the tendency for fearfulness/shyness. The poodles I’ve been around have been shy, not just aloof, and they bark CONSTANTLY. You’d want to make sure to get one from a great breeder that really knows their lines. Otherwise they’re intelligent, highly trainable, lots of energy, nice dogs. I agree with doing more research and meeting more dogs if you can!
I see nervy shyness is poodles too. Agree with intelligent and highly trainable

A brave aussie can handle anything. I see a lot of fightiness (with other dogs- can be pretty hair trigger nasty, not really dangerous to another dog but obnoxious) and same sex aggression but these are mostly all from one breeder and I think it might be a problem in her lines because I've had a good handful of aussies not from this breeder and none were so fighty or hair trigger.

They are wild players though
 

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Also, since it’s too late to edit my post, I’m not sure if you know about it already, but there’s a poodle forum identical to this one for, well, poodles! That would be a great resource for you if you decide to go the poodle route or even for learning more about the breed during your research. Let us know what you decide!
 

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We had two Newfoundlands over a span of about 17 years. Both were very true to the breed temperament, gentle giants. That did not mean they could not be watchdogs of a sort, and my first one, a female, was especially protective of my wife and children. When a 120-150 pound dog stands up and barks at the door like a cannon going off, most people take heed. They were more accepting of strangers and quicker to warm up to house guests than our now deceased GSD. People might say this is mumbo-jumbo, but the female especially had a sense of when someone was welcome or not. She once ran a pizza man out the door when he let himself in the house while my wife was getting her purse to pay. My kids were elementary school through college age and often had friends over for sleepovers or visits. We never had to put either of the Newfs up. And neighbors loved them.


Neither of ours had any wanderlust. And they are not jumpers. So a moderate height fence will generally keep them in.


To my taste, they were beautiful, stately looking dogs. You have to brush them a lot, and they will shed like crazy in summer. We literally wore out vacuum cleaners. Newfs truly do grow for 2 full years. I got a female at 11 months, 88 pounds. At 24 months, more or less on the dot, she was a lean 120 pounds.
The notion that they lie around, slobber and won't exercise is a little overstated. And depending on the particular dog, may not be true at all. Both of mine liked a walk, and the female pretty much demanded one a day. The snowier it was (we lived in SW Ohio, and for 3 years N. Indiana), the happier she was to be out.


They are not as biddable as a shepherd, but they are not dumb dogs by any means either. Mine were sensitive to sharp corrections, and could get a little sulky. But they were very hard bonders and loving dogs.


They can tend to be short-lived, although my female went 10 years plus. Our big male bonded with a female Golden we had. They would play together, and he would pull his punches a little when they roughhoused, and let her "win" occasionally. Then he'd make up his mind he wanted some toy and just yank it away.. When he passed, she grieved and would howl, which she had never done before.


The female Newf could have a lot of separation anxiety, and you did not want to leave her alone in the house with food on the kitchen counter. The male had little separation anxiety and was more chill in general. He loved a walk but could be content just being petted if you weren't so inclined. He did like attention though, and if you were watching TV he might yip for you to get on the floor and pet him.
 

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Your BF should have a choice, which means poodles, but I would take an Aussie over any mentioned. Chessies can be very difficult and so can Standard poodles. A neighbor rehomed two for the family of a man who died unexpectedly and they were very aggressive with strangers. They had not been socialized well. Aussies are another herding breed so you will find much in common with the dog you already have. Unfortunately there are no Aussie forums. I am considering adding one and have not found a place where they are discussed in any detail.
 

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I’ve heard lots of great things about poodles from people that own them and have met a number that I’ve really liked. Have you thought about a Doberman? I have a Dobe/GSD mix but he is much more Dobe in temperament. He is very much a sentry, nothing escapes his attention. He is also aloof towards people, he couldn’t care less about them wanting to pet him and generally acts like they’re not even there. And by people I mean strangers, he is a total loving goofball with his family. Vocal, but in a talkative way instead of incessant. Highly intelligent, but not as biddable as my GSD. Have to negotiate. Fearless and brave when it comes to initiating a threat. For being a big dog (29” 90 lbs) he is so graceful, he just floats over the ground and reminds me much like a horse. Super agile and athletic for said size as well.

The downfalls? He cries when I leave so has a degree of separation anxiety and some are much worse, he does settle down eventually. He has so much energy that he gets himself into anxiety fits when he’s so excited at the prospect of doing something fun. He whines like crazy in the car because he anticipates getting to where we’re going, and once we do he is non stop on the move checking everything out. Another thing to consider is if you are against crop and dock it is nay impossible to find a reputable breeder in the US that is willing to leave their pup natural. By the time they’re old enough to be evaluated and chosen for their homes, it’s too late to perform the procedure. This means importing from overseas where it’s illegal or going to a BYB. This was a major reason I went with a GSD for another dog, as I do not agree with crop dock and hardly have the means (or want) to purchase a dog internationally. I will say my GSD is definitely one of the most wonderful dogs I’ve had, he is my first and not my last. He is the total package, id go on but that’s why we’re all here :)
 
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