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I was just reading an article about Fero vom Zeutener Himmelreich written by Ed Leerburg. In this article it was said that.... well here is the quote so I don't miss write it. "Am I the only one who seems to see that dogs with fine heads and fine bones have weak nerves? I think not, Bernard Flinks mentioned this fact..." and it goes on. This comment caught my attention. Do think there is any truth to this? How would one test/prove this?
 

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I was just reading an article about Fero vom Zeutener Himmelreich written by Ed Leerburg. In this article it was said that.... well here is the quote so I don't miss write it. "Am I the only one who seems to see that dogs with fine heads and fine bones have weak nerves? I think not, Bernard Flinks mentioned this fact..." and it goes on. This comment caught my attention. Do think there is any truth to this? How would one test/prove this?
My female would be considered fine boned and she is not by any means weak nerved, so I'd have to say no I don't believe it at all.
 

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My male is thick boned and he is full of himself. I wouldn't call my females, who are thinner than him, weak nerve though. Both do very well in a variety of environments and circumstances.
 

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GSD were regional working dogs that merged into one "breed" for uniformity.

the northern dog -- Thuringian was a longer limbed , slighter build , different head , finer , longer , sometimes without stop
the central dogs - Wurttembergers and Swabian came from the planes , different function - different body , lower set, heavier , sometimes drop eared, sometimes long coated . temperament less reactive. more active aggression . higher threshold .
maybe this is where the statement is from.
 

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except that Fero did not have weak nerves.

Right! But he was talking about some of Fero's progeny. Either way the article was about Fero but the statement was GSD wide. It just caught my attention and I was wondering if you thought it had any truth to it.
 

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GSD were regional working dogs that merged into one "breed" for uniformity.

the northern dog -- Thuringian was a longer limbed , slighter build , different head , finer , longer , sometimes without stop
the central dogs - Wurttembergers and Swabian came from the planes , different function - different body , lower set, heavier , sometimes drop eared, sometimes long coated . temperament less reactive. more active aggression . higher threshold .
maybe this is where the statement is from.

This could be it. I don't know. I just read that and found it to be an interesting generalization. It made me start to think about all the dogs I have worked. If I was to make a generalization about the dogs I have worked I would say that the big head/boned dogs seemed to be harder dogs and extremely confident. I couldn't say that's because of structure though. IMO they have also been some of the better bred dogs I have worked so...
 

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I would say no to the basic premise that the corellation with fine heads and weak nerves exist....I know some real tough lines with and without Fero with fine heads that are known for strong nerves. NOW, you can breed for many generations, dogs that are rewarded for fine heads and in the new creation come up with dogs with high percent of fine heads and weak nerves....there is ample evidence of that.
 

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I would say no to the basic premise that the corellation with fine heads and weak nerves exist....I know some real tough lines with and without Fero with fine heads that are known for strong nerves. NOW, you can breed for many generations, dogs that are rewarded for fine heads and in the new creation come up with dogs with high percent of fine heads and weak nerves....there is ample evidence of that.
Is there any evidence of dogs with big heads/bone and weak nerves? Seems that people are only saying that some fine head/bone dogs have good nerves. Constitutional psychology was pop psychology several decades ago. It is over simplified and based on stereotypes in humans. Looks like it is being carried over to canines (?)
 

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Lol, I don't know much psychology, and I don't know the clinical definition of stereotype:), I DO know if I see something that holds true a vast majority of the time it's a pretty safe correlation. But my remarks are only based on my experiences, I'm sure others have other conclusions:).
 

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I believe that weak nerves are from NOT choosing breeding partners with good nerve strength, whether or not they have fine bone.
 

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Still waiting to hear from someone who has experienced a dog with strong head/bone that is weak nerved.
Look at some of the videos from past Sieger Shows. Many of the males have heads bordering on excessive (though the bone not as much, strong but not crazy).
 

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There are plenty of dogs with big heads and weak nerves, like Lies said just look at some videos of Seiger show performances...the WGSL today often exhibits large heads, there are workinglines dogs with weak nerves and big heads, there are dogs of any size head and weak nerves. Period....but you will find weak nerves and big heads more often in some camps than others, and you will find weak nerves and fine bone heads more often in other camps....but weak nerves exists in all lines....just to different degrees.
 

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Temple Grandin wrote about this in one of her books. She made the same correlation--slender, fine-boned animals tend to be more nervous and flighty, while heavier-boned, stocky animals tended to be calmer. I believe she was using horses as an example; fine-boned Arabs and Thoroughbreds tend to be high strung, while draft horses are calm.

While there does seem to be a correlation with horses, not so much with dogs. I have known very calm Greyhounds and totally neurotic Mastiffs.

I think the argument had something to do with the way fat is metabolized. Fat is essential for proper development and maintenance of the nervous system, and the lean, fine-boned animals carry little fat in their bodies, not enough to ensure proper nerve function.

It's an interesting theory, but I'm not sure it holds water.
 

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"fine-boned Arabs and Thoroughbreds tend to be high strung"

thin boned animals have a lower fat % therefore are more nervous?

arabs & TB were bred fine boned AND highly stung for speed, stamina, endurance....that is not cause and effect.
 
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