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Do you work at GDB? I watched that Disney + show...:)

The trainer I'm working with worked with GDB somewhere out east that trains German shepherds. Sometimes I wish I could quit my job and go work for them haha...
Hmmm I just googled and looks like GDB isn't actually out east, and they don't do GSDs anymore....I guess it was a different company.
 

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Am I correct in assuming that most of these dogs are neutered? With that assumption in mind, would I be correct that these dogs are not kept as ribby as many prefer their GSDs? Studies have linked leanness to bloat.
Correct that all training and working dogs are altered... that’s the population that i have direct contact with. i don’t know the number of dogs at puppy raising level, nor our breeders - but as you’d imagine, those populations are intact.

And no, Labs don’t generally come in ribby, lol.... but there are some. our Goldens tend to be pretty lean however.
 

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My vet told me the "fat labs" are the ones he sees mostly bloat.
eh, hate to admit it, but of those “couple thousand” working in the field... there are fat ones. sigh.
 

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So I'm scared of bloat. Like, really scared of it. I do what I can to prevent it if possible, like feeding Willow two smaller meals per day instead of one big one, limiting exercise before and after meals, trying to keep her from gulping water after a big exercise/play session. I realize there's research out there that shows that some dogs are just genetically prone to it and there's nothing you can do about it, but all the same, I'm kinda doing whatever I can to prevent it.

Anyway, I know they say that deep-chested dogs are more prone to it than others. Willow is a working line, straight-backed GSD, and honestly when I look at her I just don't see a deep chest. I see pics of other GSDs, particularly show lines or larger males, and I see it. Maybe I just don't understand deep-chestedness. But there are two boxers that play with Willow in the park sometimes and one of them has a MONDO chest, he looks like a friggin keel of a ship.

So, I was curious if anyone out there has noticed an increased or decreased propensity to bloat with the various lines of GSDs. And maybe if anyone can explain deep-chestedness to me! I've attached a couple pics of Willow, I don't have a ton of pics that show her profile....
Hello! I’m worried about bloat as well, my brothers dog died of bloat. Do you have one of the slow feeder dog bowls?
 

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So I'm scared of bloat. Like, really scared of it. I do what I can to prevent it if possible, like feeding Willow two smaller meals per day instead of one big one, limiting exercise before and after meals, trying to keep her from gulping water after a big exercise/play session. I realize there's research out there that shows that some dogs are just genetically prone to it and there's nothing you can do about it, but all the same, I'm kinda doing whatever I can to prevent it.

Anyway, I know they say that deep-chested dogs are more prone to it than others. Willow is a working line, straight-backed GSD, and honestly when I look at her I just don't see a deep chest. I see pics of other GSDs, particularly show lines or larger males, and I see it. Maybe I just don't understand deep-chestedness. But there are two boxers that play with Willow in the park sometimes and one of them has a MONDO chest, he looks like a friggin keel of a ship.

So, I was curious if anyone out there has noticed an increased or decreased propensity to bloat with the various lines of GSDs. And maybe if anyone can explain deep-chestedness to me! I've attached a couple pics of Willow, I don't have a ton of pics that show her profile....
My dog was in for an unrelated surgery and the Vet offered to tack his stomach while he was in there to prevent bloat. You may want to find out more about that. I know it’s a surgery so there is a lot to consider.
 

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I don't. She doesn't snarf her food too badly. She does give a good burp after every meal though...
I bought one for Indy because I don’t know how fast they need to snarf their food to get bloat. I figure preventing it the best I can is all I can do. I give her two meals a day instead of one, and use a bowl that helps her to eat slowly. It eases my mind.
 

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You could always do away with the bowl and feed by hand for doing "work". That way eating slows down and you get some team building done.

When my gal dog went for her spay at 18 months, we had her stomach tacked. She's very active and the tacking will reduce the risk of torsion. That doesn't stop bloat entirely but if she does start to bloat it should reduce the risk of the stomach flipping.
 

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If you're looking for the known correlations for bloat, this thread has a lot of info (and dispels some myths like using raised feeders, waiting a certain amount of time after eating to walk, and moistening food):

There is a strong genetic correlation, so knowing whether your dog has any first-degree relatives that bloated may be a very important information if you have access to it.
 

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There is a study that is almost done being published. I contacted them about volunteering my puppy to participate in the trials, but they declined as they are done collecting data.

Hopefully, they will have something interesting to tell us about what they found!

this is the study my dog is participating in. I've received no word since the initial update.

@JRadtke - do I have your email address? If not, send it to me and I'll forward the only updates we had which was in 2017
 

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My bet is that there is likely a confluence of circumstances that come together that causes an incidence of bloat. We humans always want to make simple correlations.
Growing up, we had two Irish Setters (not at the same time) who each suffered bloat and torsion. Both were saved by emergency surgery. The first one, was a slow picky eater. The other one, an average eater. Neither of them were active after eating, nor prior to the event.
You just never know if or when it's going to happen. It's jut important to be aware of it and don't hesitate about getting to the vet if you suspect it at all.
 
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