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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So...we have a new puppy. Yes, I realize 10 weeks old is a baby, and I’m educating myself as much as possible on this breed, but this girl is HUGE for her age.
Potty training woes aside (my poor house, and yeah, I’m crate training and know it’ll take time), it seems I have a tiny, vicious hellbeast.
She attacks your ankles with feral growling and happily carries off anything in her path to destroy. She managed to get my iPhone in her mouth earlier which almost made me fall of the couch desperately trying to wrestle it from her. Verbal corrections seem to excite her. But that’s not even the issue.
It’s the cat.
The pup sees the cat, her ears perk, and she looks for all the world like a predator scenting prey. She captures the cat, and proceeds to bite it with puppy-sharp teeth. My previously docile cat whom showed her belly to the pup on the first night, as if she were meeting a new human that would pet her, is now a hissing nervous wreck.
She’s now taunting the dog when up on the couch and smacking her with what seems like resentment and now hisses at us as well.
My house has become a Tom and Jerry episode.
Suggestions before I lose my GD mind or Freya hurts my cat seriously??!!
She also spooks my 11 year old daughter with her growling, biting play.
 

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Do you keep the puppy leashed and attached to you when out of the crate? That will help set clearer guidelines of behaviour around the cat. Your puppy should not be chasing or capturing the cat, she should be taught to sit and settle when she sees the cat. Work on a basic command like sit or down and have the puppy practice when they see the cat (this could take some time). Hopefully it will sink in that the cat=calm time.

For biting - well, she's a puppy. It's what they do. We have had success with Neb as a puppy and now Agis using redirection onto toys and tugging - it's a positive way to teach them that humans are not bite rags!
 

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They need to be separated until you have a foundation of manners with your puppy. Anything else isn’t fair to your cat right now.

I would prioritize impulse control in every aspect of your puppy’s routine. Wait at doors, wait for food, wait to be let out of crate, etc. Start teaching “Leave it” with food today, and as the weeks go by, generalize the command to other desirable objects. If you search “It’s Yer Choice” you’ll find tons of videos on how to begin.

Ultimately you will tell your dog “LEAVE IT” to leave the cat alone, but first your puppy has to learn what that means.

The emphasis on impulse control will set a foundation for your puppy mentally checking in with you when a door is opened, or when let out of a crate. This will give you time to stop a bad situation before it ends in injury.

Some puppies are naturally awesome with cats, others absolutely are not. But it is SO MUCH easier to teach cat manners if the puppy has not gotten in the ingrained habit of chasing (or worse, biting) the cat.

Most can learn to cohabit within reason, but some GSDs have more serious predatory tendencies and have to be separated permanently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thank you!
Locking my cat away is impossible. (I have 4 kids that adore her!) so I’ll incorporate the rest of the advice. Oddly, the cat almost seems to seek the pup out? Like slowly sauntering around her then bolting, igniting a chase. Confuses me since the cat now seems to be a nervous wreck. One thing though - never a dull moment in this house :oops::LOL:
This is Freya (pup), and Athena.
 

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Tether her to you when she is out of her crate. It will help with the housebreaking too. There has already been self gratification/stimulation reward for messing with the cat. You have some work ahead of you.

Have you been redirecting her to a tug toy when she landsharks anyone or anything? With this breed "bite THIS not THAT" yields better results than yelling, yelping, running etc. It is a rough stage but with consistent redirection it usually passes. My 12 (now 13) year old daughter always had a tug on her for this stage, so did I. We had shredded arms and ankles during the puppy puppy stage. But it did pass. I also have 2 autistic boys and my daughter and I just constantly supervised and redirected of the boys, ourselves, etc. Consistency is key.
 
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