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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everybody,

I'm trying to remain on the positive enforcement side of things. This will be my first shepherd that I'm trying to teach the positive reinforcement aspect of bite inhibition, where as I'm doing the "ouch" and rewarding her if she desists and leaving the room if she doesn't. She's actually doing pretty well. Responding well to it, usually is a lot calmer when I return after leaving her.

However, every now and then she just completely locks down. Whether it's on my arm or say on a piece of c!othing. No ammount of "ouch" will back her off.

What's the most proper way to handle this? I'm trying to desist forcing her mouth open or being heavy handed with her, but my arms are pretty tore up right now from pulling my limbs out without using any force on her. I obviously can't sit there and let her chew on me if she's not responding to "ouch".

Appreciate the tips and how you handle breaking "lockjaw"
 

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Teach your dog to stop when you say stop! I Loved to play and wrestle with my puppy, so I didn't ever teach her to not bite me. BUT! I did teach her to stop when I said STOP. And I did that by just sort of squaring up to her and saying it in a demanding tone. Stop means stop! Play ends now! There were times that I was laughing so hard that even saying stop would have been difficult, but when I did say it she always did listen...

I'm not sure what you mean when you say your dog is locked on. But when that happens I'd lose all sense of play and demand she let go in a very clear, and demanding tone, and I wouldn't stop until she did let go! Not a fight, it's a demand. It's kind of hard to explain but easy to demonstrate. It's really all in your tone and demeanor! But it has to be non negotiable also, don't ever say it unless you mean it, and if you say it don't ever allow non compliance...it's not a request.
 

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If my dogs latch onto me and don't let go, I stop moving completely. Fingers go in the back of the jaw behind the teeth and squeeze a bit. When they let go I get big and glare a moment...but just a moment. Then I swap to a redirect and praise approved behavior..."OK, lets go find your tug, good dog".

If I want my dog to release a toy in play I wouldn't do it this way, but if my dog is hurting me I'm going to let them know with my body language that I won't put up with it. The play following the release is to let the pup know I still accept them and we are still good. The dog needs an outlet and playing together with toys helps quite a bit.



If it is just the scrapes of sharp puppy teeth from play and not a chomp, well, that is on me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks everybody for the feedback. I've been getting more firm with her when she crosses the line and it's been showing better results. The redirection with toys has helped as well. Thank you much.

She also just learned take it, drop it, and leave it. So hoping with more practice she will overall be a less impulsive pup.
 

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Hello everybody,

I'm trying to remain on the positive enforcement side of things. This will be my first shepherd that I'm trying to teach the positive reinforcement aspect of bite inhibition, where as I'm doing the "ouch" and rewarding her if she desists and leaving the room if she doesn't. She's actually doing pretty well. Responding well to it, usually is a lot calmer when I return after leaving her.

However, every now and then she just completely locks down. Whether it's on my arm or say on a piece of c!othing. No ammount of "ouch" will back her off.

What's the most proper way to handle this? I'm trying to desist forcing her mouth open or being heavy handed with her, but my arms are pretty tore up right now from pulling my limbs out without using any force on her. I obviously can't sit there and let her chew on me if she's not responding to "ouch".

Appreciate the tips and how you handle breaking "lockjaw"
Simply stay calm and lift up on her collar. No mouth pinching, no yelling "ouch", no screaming, no shaking by the scruff of the neck, just lift straight up by the collar and take the puppies front feet off the ground. Hold the puppy calmly until it lets go. Then give it something appropriate to bite.

One other thing is that you really do not want to "pull your limbs out" of the dog's mouth. That will leave a mark for sure.

It's teething and this is what puppies do. All puppies, not just GSD's. Learn to enjoy the puppy phase, it will be gone before you know it.

Being calm, not yelling, not losing your temper and lots of patience are the key. Screaming or yelling, fast hand movements and pulling your arms away will elicit more of a reaction from the dog. Stay calm and puppy on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Simply stay calm and lift up on her collar. No mouth pinching, no yelling "ouch", no screaming, no shaking by the scruff of the neck, just lift straight up by the collar and take the puppies front feet off the ground. Hold the puppy calmly until it lets go. Then give it something appropriate to bite.

One other thing is that you really do not want to "pull your limbs out" of the dog's mouth. That will leave a mark for sure.

It's teething and this is what puppies do. All puppies, not just GSD's. Learn to enjoy the puppy phase, it will be gone before you know it.

Being calm, not yelling, not losing your temper and lots of patience are the key. Screaming or yelling, fast hand movements and pulling your arms away will elicit more of a reaction from the dog. Stay calm and puppy on.
Thank you!!! This has been working as well. I've seen very good improvement since I posted this thanks to all your input. She's doing very good.
 
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