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Yes! We need pictures of both of them please! I had the same thing go on with my dog, but I trained him (I guess) to either stay still on the bed and give me a little space so that he wasn't right on top of me or to sleep on the floor. Before that he thought that he always needed to sleep on the bed.
 

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The male is more inclined than the female to simply hop on the bed and snuggle for a while if we don't get up right away.

Trouble is, he weighs well over 70 lbs. And while he is not clumsy in general, when he lies down to sleep, he drops like a big puppy wherever he feels like it.
So he might jump up and lie right across either me or my wife for a little bit, then move to another spot.

Usually it wakes me up, because the sensation is a little like a sack of cement just got tossed on the bed.
But I'm a little concerned he could jump up, lie across one of us in a manner that cuts off breathing, and . . . yikes.

Maybe a king-sized bed would give him a bigger landing pad.

Anyone heard any horror stories about people being accidentally smothered in their sleep by their large dog? I'm seriously a little concerned.
Or is it safe to assume one would wake up and start flailing away? We have had 130-160 lb. Newfoundlands in the past, but they did not have the hops this 7 month old possesses, and preferred sleeping on the floor.
He is a 7 month old teenage bull in a china shop GSD. GSD's are very physically affectionate dogs (usually). He is just trying to be close to you and your wife. My boy slept with me , plopped down half on me, leg across my face or chest (like his version of a hug), bed circle zoomie body slammed me, and in his morning excitement to see me generally landed on me with paws and elbows digging into my full morning bladder or tender lady bits - and lots of kisses cause that makes it all okay ! lol . Nothin' says lovin' like a 70lb body slam !
My first girl did the same. I honestly don't what to say. I taught them to stay on their side of the bed but only because I need more than 6 inches of space to sleep. Even then they would sleep with head on my shoulder and leg across my stomach because they still like contact.
Never once did it occur to me to be worried.
As David said if there was a problem you would wake up not to mention that GSD's are smart enough to never do anything to genuinely hurt their "person".
I think it's rather sweet that he wants to be that close to you and a little sad that you look at him like someone who is going to potentially hurt you.
I hope he gets enough physical affection from your female GSD.
I honestly don't know what to say but you might not want to believe everything you read on the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The reference to Custer, forest fires and de-icing planes was over the top, I admit. Though all those things happened, not sure if they were posed as questions at the time or dismissed as stupid questions. And they surely had little to do with the answers to my question or with GSDs, and I guess it came off as a little pissy instead of humorous albeit longwinded on my part.
So, my apologies.

Anyway, I do appreciate the answers on this forum, even if I sometimes have a strange way of showing it. Sometimes it is a slow day at work.

David Winners previously sent me a message which connected me, an admitted novice, with a Schutzhund training outfit which has shown patience with me and hence elicited some progress with my dogs. Others on the forum connected me with breeders. So in my more reflective moments, I express appreciation with no snarkiness at all.

I would agree it seems very unlikely, based on the science (sleep apnea or similar disorder aside), and just the fact that anecdotally no one has ever even heard of it, and best I can come up with is a cat lying across someone's neck.

I kind of want to have it both ways. I do like it when the dog snuggles in on a cold night, so long as he/she is not a bed-hog forcing me off the edge. And we run the AC a lot, so it is usually a fairly cold night at my place. So I don't discourage it. Mostly these two sleep on the floor until 5:45- 6:00ish. The hopping up is kind of an escalated response to, hey, you ignored my touching your side of the bed, so I'll try this. Then once he's up there, he is OK with hitting the snooze button, so to speak, but he splays out wherever he feels like it.

A barrier of the sort described above by WNGD might work. As long as I remember it's there and don't take a header.
 

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Anyone heard any horror stories about people being accidentally smothered in their sleep by their large dog? I'm seriously a little concerned.
And if they were smothered, would they be alive to tell the tale?

I feel ya. Why do they need to lie on my head? That only happens in the morning when they decide it's time for me to wake up and throwing themselves on my head seems to be their first method of attack. Most times, they get tired of being kicked and stay clear of my body pre-alarm clock.
 

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I slept with a whole pack, close for warmth. Their choice, but one I was happy for.
Honestly I was more concerned about injuries from nails or boney elbows.
While they did occasionally lay on my head, in my experience dogs possess naturally occurring air pockets, designed to fit over the human face, although the sensation of fur in your mouth is disturbing and gross.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Here is the bed-jumper. I don't have an exact weight on him, because our scale is finicky about where you place your feet, and he gets squirmy before we get a valid reading. But I'm guessing he is close to 80 lbs. A previous dog went about 82 and he feels similar in weight. Our female is about 68 lbs and I feel a definite difference picking them up.

Decoy in photo is a sturdy guy, but with more the build of a cornerback, not a lineman.

My wife is at right in one pic. Maybe she should be the one to correct him, if we so chose, but she is too deep of a sleeper:sleep: It is not so much his size, though he seems large-ish for 7 months, but when he jumps, he lands with authority. And he's bigger boned than our female, so if his paw is draped over you, you feel it. He has a very sweet temperament in general.
 

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The posts almost sounds like you allow this heavy dog to jump on you or your wife. What if "it" happens to either one of you? If you consider this a risk, why even discussing this and not play it safe? It all sounds weird to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The posts almost sounds like you allow this heavy dog to jump on you or your wife. What if "it" happens to either one of you? If you consider this a risk, why even discussing this and not play it safe? It all sounds weird to me.
He does not jump on us deliberately. But the bed is high enough that he can't aim his jump to completely miss us. His jumping is a signal to "get up, I may need to go out. Or maybe I want to be fed." And it usually comes after he has already tried to get us up by sniffing or nosing at the side of the bed. So more like a 5:45-6:45 thing, not a middle of the night thing.
Also, it is not so much the jumping that was my concern as the manner he lays on top of us at times.

It's all good, I think. He did it again this morning, and he is seemingly learning how to place himself against us rather than over the top of us.

I think it's rather sweet that he wants to be that close to you and a little sad that you look at him like someone who is going to potentially hurt you.
I hope he gets enough physical affection from your female GSD.
He both gives and receives lots of physical affection. Mostly from my wife and I. He and the female are more about spirited play.
Never saw him as deliberately trying to harm me. More a question about physical dynamics of what might happen if one was asleep, then suddenly had a good sized dog's front leg or head or whatever draped over one's neck.

As I think this through, some of this arises from COVID, and us not setting alarms as early as we used to. Pre-COVD, my wife tended to get up quite early anyway.
Now she works from home, so the office is 20 feet away. Hence the extra morning snoozing. Hence the jumping.
 
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