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Getting an 8 week old puppy mid January. Trying to remember how to best potty train her. The previous puppies I had seemed to be so easy and didn't need to go out too much at night. But I can't remember what I did to achieve that. Most importantly to me would be to get the puppy to sleep all night. What worked for everyone's pups?
 

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For me, I have the pups sleep next to me in bed from day one. If you prefer not to have your dogs sleep with you, disregard. I didn’t sleep much in the beginning but I could feel the slightest stir from a puppy, and took them out immediately. Be sure to carry them. Take them out at least every hour even if they don’t act like they have to go, and pay close attention as their signs as pups are much more subtle than accustomed adults. Don’t go back in until they go. They’re puppies, it doesn’t take too long. Lavishly praise and offer treats the moment they start going outside. If you catch them inside, say NO and immediately pick them up and replace them outdoors. Be sure to use bleach or an enzyme remover if they eliminate inside the house, otherwise they will continue to want to go there.

Welcome to puppyhood! I personally love it. It can be taxing but if you follow a code from the beginning it will set you up for early success. GSDs are veyry smart and biddable.
 

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For me, I have the pups sleep next to me in bed from day one. If you prefer not to have your dogs sleep with you, disregard. I didn’t sleep much in the beginning but I could feel the slightest stir from a puppy, and took them out immediately. Be sure to carry them. Take them out at least every hour even if they don’t act like they have to go, and pay close attention as their signs as pups are much more subtle than accustomed adults. Don’t go back in until they go. They’re puppies, it doesn’t take too long. Lavishly praise and offer treats the moment they start going outside. If you catch them inside, say NO and immediately pick them up and replace them outdoors. Be sure to use bleach or an enzyme remover if they eliminate inside the house, otherwise they will continue to want to go there.

Welcome to puppyhood! I personally love it. It can be taxing but if you follow a code from the beginning it will set you up for early success. GSDs are very smart and biddable.
 

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Get a consistent routine and supervise when your puppy is loose. If you are busy or distracted then put the puppy in a crate. Most puppies instinctively do not want to potty where they sleep. If your breeder has made a good start on potty training it should not be difficult. Most people struggle with it if the puppy came from dirty conditions or they give the puppy too much unsupervised freedom. A puppy doesn't need free run of your whole house, set up boundaries and increase freedom as they mature.

My last two puppies were sleeping through the night by 9 weeks. When they woke me up to potty at night I kept it low key. Take them out of the crate, put a leash on and carry them outside, I did not talk to or pet them at all. Once outside I put them down in the potty area and gave them 2 minutes to potty. If they did I praised softly. After they went or after two minutes I picked them back up and they go back inside and in their crate. I do not play with them or go walking all over, or make waking me up at night = fun play or cuddle time.
 

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For me, I have the pups sleep next to me in bed from day one. If you prefer not to have your dogs sleep with you, disregard. I didn’t sleep much in the beginning but I could feel the slightest stir from a puppy, and took them out immediately. Be sure to carry them. Take them out at least every hour even if they don’t act like they have to go, and pay close attention as their signs as pups are much more subtle than accustomed adults. Don’t go back in until they go. They’re puppies, it doesn’t take too long. Lavishly praise and offer treats the moment they start going outside. If you catch them inside, say NO and immediately pick them up and replace them outdoors. Be sure to use bleach or an enzyme remover if they eliminate inside the house, otherwise they will continue to want to go there.

Welcome to puppyhood! I personally love it. It can be taxing but if you follow a code from the beginning it will set you up for early success. GSDs are veyry smart and biddable.
This is the way we train our pups, too. It's easy to feel when they start to get restless and we take them out right away. They feel secure and safe being near you so there is no drama with being away from their mom and siblings.

We gradually introduce them to a crate and keep that by the bed. After a few weeks, they are happily sleeping on their own in a crate.

During the day, the pup needs to go out after eating, playing, napping, and often between those things. Some people have a set time to take him out, like every 30 minutes. The pup should never be out of sight if he isn't in a crate or tethered to you.

It doesn't take long, but it does take dedication. Best of luck with your new puppy.
 

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For potty training, I was home every day, all day with my pup. I set a timer. My pup also went out after drinking, after eating, after playing, before playing, any excuse really. Praise for potty outside and I blamed myself for inside mistakes. I kept him on a long line so he was always close. If I couldn’t watch him, he was kenneled. Nap time is very important to these little guys so don’t feel bad about sticking them in the kennel if you know you will be distracted. This will also prep the puppy for his all-nighters in the kennel. I also used bells on the door and had him follow a piece of kibble so his nose hit the bells followed by saying ‘outside’. He picked up on that very fast but we do get some bell abuse (requests to go out and play ball rather than potty).

My pup had a great start at the breeder but it is good to know what that starts was. My breeder had a litter area that looked very similar to one of my dog beds so there was an accident there and we pieced together the reasoning fairly quickly. I would say he got the concept within a week and the few mistakes after that were on me for not paying enough attention.

As far as kenneling all night. Prepare for screaming and stay strong. I gave my pup the first two nights with me in bed so he was comfortable with the house and had a few days with kennel time to get used to the space. Control his water intake before bed time. Every dog seems to be different as to how long holding it all night takes. Mine has taken several months.
 

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Well it has been a week since my puppy arrived. She is 9 weeks old today! She has really caught on about the potty training. 99% of the time she will go to a door to go out. She generally gets right down to business outside. The other 1% is a mystery to me. I guess she is busy playing and just doesn't think about it. It can be shortly after she had a potty break and I am feeling comfortable that she should be okay for a little while. She will be playing and then just suddenly stop and pee! I scoop her up and take her out to finish. Not her fault I know, but not sure how I could have seen that coming either.
So far no accidents at night in the crate. Of course I am still doing the middle of the night potty runs. She is my first winter puppy and it was a lot easier in the warm weather. Now when she wakes me in the middle of the night it's a contest of can I get my hat, coat, boots, and gloves on before the puppy pees.....
 
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