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The term for a male dog is neuter - Spay refers to a doggy histerectomy (sp). I would not neuter your dog now. I'd wait until he was much older - at least 2 yo but more likely 5 or more. They're coming up with health issues regarding neutering for skeletal/joint issues and cancer. Wait.
 

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My vet told me to wait after first heat. Because of hormones, something goes wrong and dogs don't grow properly.

I can't say I wasn't disappointed, I don't know how I am going to deal with blood, diapers are no go, she would want to play with them :D I guess I'm gonna use some clothing ... Doing what's best for her. It's better to wait 2-3 weeks than pay more than 5000 euros for operations.

Great post btw, I was in dilemma too. Still am, if I'm honest.
 

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I haven't spoken to my vet yet about spaying my Xena yet. I do plan on spaying her at 6 months. Right now she is an outside dog; hoping to bring in her inside but not yet. We have some wandering male dogs I know are not fixed. I don't want to deal with puppies that you can't give away and I don't want to send any to shelters. I believe it would be best for her to be fixed at 6 months.
 

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There are pros and cons to staying intact and spaying. I chose to wait until 18 months to spay. My gal went through two heats. That being said, I have adopted shelter dogs that were spayed younger (I guess. most people do it at 6 months without questioning why) and they had good lives.

I chose about 18 months to let my gal's body grow to it's full height. The mess was something I had to deal with but it wasn't horrible. We did miss out on a dog fair because my gal was in season. A bitch in season can go to trials and training but they have to go last so that their scent doesn't distract the other dogs training. With two heats there is a slight risk for mammary cancer but perhaps a smaller risk for other issues. There are no guarantees.
 

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I haven't spoken to my vet yet about spaying my Xena yet. I do plan on spaying her at 6 months. Right now she is an outside dog; hoping to bring in her inside but not yet. We have some wandering male dogs I know are not fixed. I don't want to deal with puppies that you can't give away and I don't want to send any to shelters. I believe it would be best for her to be fixed at 6 months.
I think if she will continue to be outside, I would definitely spay her at 6 months. Just a word of advice, Della went into heat at 6 months, so take all precautions. All of my dogs have been spayed between 6-12 months. I know the current thinking has changed, but mine have all been fine.
 

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My Bear is 6yrs old now, he just got neutered less than 6mos ago. I was worried his perfect personality would change and it didnt. He is perfect as he was when he was a baby.
 

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Is anyone else fed up with vets (and their vet techs) having contrary opinions in front of you during a visit? I was told that shepherds continue to develop until they are about 18 months old. I was also told to neuter my dog as soon as possible, we'll see you at 11 months and no later than 12 months. This was all in one visit. Maybe I'm done with Banfield. ^.^
 

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Is anyone else fed up with vets (and their vet techs) having contrary opinions in front of you during a visit? I was told that shepherds continue to develop until they are about 18 months old. I was also told to neuter my dog as soon as possible, we'll see you at 11 months and no later than 12 months. This was all in one visit. Maybe I'm done with Banfield. ^.^


GSD's should not be spayed or neutered before 12 months of age. They, and Golden Retrievers, are prone to cancer when spayed/neutered at a young age.
 

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I wish more breeders would take this into account while requiring these surgeries per contract. Some even claim that neutering and spaying is healthier than leaving them intact.
 

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I wish more breeders would take this into account while requiring these surgeries per contract. Some even claim that neutering and spaying is healthier than leaving them intact.
Honestly until people get more responsible I think it does more good than harm. Breeders who have spay/neuter contracts and enforce them are helping from people who get talked into just one litter. Or the neighbor's dog might jump the fence and accidentally breed the female or the male hood to fence trolling for the ladies.

I do know of breeders that require waiting until 18 months old or parts of the health guarantee such as for hip dysplasia are voided. But overall especially with the current breed my dog to anything and if it's mixed give it a designer dog name and make some cash on puppies, spaying and neutering needs to happen even more than it does.

I'd much rather more people get educated on responsible owning and buying dogs but there isn't a huge movement on that. And if spay/neuter decreases due to the health concerns then dog numbers are going to increase. Just because the vast majority of the public currently spay/neuter but if we switch that up then it'll be easier for people to be talked into 'just one litter' or for there to be lots of oops.

I support responsible owners not choosing to spay and neuter and I'll personally probably leave any future males intact and continue to spay females at 2-3(due to pyometra risk) But I'm not going to suggest it to most people. If my uncle had neutered his dog younger his wife wouldn't have gotten a very human aggressive female dog (3 years old, has bitten multiple people including me since they just recently got her) and brought 6 more mixed puppies into the world and if any of them turn out aggressive like the mother I doubt any of the homes will be able to handle them.
 

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I wish more breeders would take this into account while requiring these surgeries per contract. Some even claim that neutering and spaying is healthier than leaving them intact.
Honestly until people get more responsible I think it does more good than harm. Breeders who have spay/neuter contracts and enforce them are helping from people who get talked into just one litter. Or the neighbor's dog might jump the fence and accidentally breed the female or the male hood to fence trolling for the ladies.

I do know of breeders that require waiting until 18 months old or parts of the health guarantee such as for hip dysplasia are voided. But overall especially with the current breed my dog to anything and if it's mixed give it a designer dog name and make some cash on puppies, spaying and neutering needs to happen even more than it does.

I'd much rather more people get educated on responsible owning and buying dogs but there isn't a huge movement on that. And if spay/neuter decreases due to the health concerns then dog numbers are going to increase. Just because the vast majority of the public currently spay/neuter but if we switch that up then it'll be easier for people to be talked into 'just one litter' or for there to be lots of oops.

I support responsible owners not choosing to spay and neuter and I'll personally probably leave any future males intact and continue to spay females at 2-3(due to pyometra risk) But I'm not going to suggest it to most people. If my uncle had neutered his dog younger his wife wouldn't have gotten a very human aggressive female dog (3 years old, has bitten multiple people including me since they just recently got her) and brought 6 more mixed puppies into the world and if any of them turn out aggressive like the mother I doubt any of the homes will be able to handle them.
I agree. I support responsible people by making exceptions to board their intact dogs.

I also recommend a lot of ppl get on with spaying/neutering asap because I know their living situation and their (lack of) dog management. Ppl with two working breed intact males running amok together with little supervision and no exercise outside the yard and the one I board is acting very "intact" and not socializing as well with other dogs. They asked me how he was doing, I said he'd do better if you go on and neuter him. I hope they do.

You have to have the right dog and the right life not to.

Doing it younger and avoiding housemate problems, social problems, and unwanted puppies is way better than whatever benefit might be obtained by keeping intact.

My 4 y/o is still intact but there will be no oops puppies and socially he is about as nice as intact males come in this breed, I think.
 

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Breeders could select their adopters more carefully and be more flexible. They could also honor a vasectomy on the male dogs. I personally don't want to be told what to do once a dog is legally mine. I am responsible, have had several intact males and none have sired an oops litter. They also have been normal dogs and not looking for fights or females in heat. In most of Europe it is the norm to leave them intact, including their ears, tails, vocal cords.
 

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2-3 years old; no earlier! I made the mistake of neutering my first GSD at 7 months and his head developed narrowly and he grew too tall. Both are classic signs that a dog was neutered too early. The hormones released by the reproductive organs help regulate how the dogs grows.
 

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I will continue to preach that an intact female is healthier if she is bred and less healthy if she isn't. An intact female who never has a litter is very prone to pyo, mammary cancer. Not to mention the stress of heat cycles.

Males are probably healthier left intact, but it depends on the sitauation. There are good reasons to neuter an intact male. Prostate issues and certain behaviors are both good reasons to neuter.
 

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There are good reasons to neuter an intact male. Prostate issues and certain behaviors are both good reasons to neuter.
Do you have evidence based information on the numbers of prostate issues in intact males? I lived in Europe for many years and never heard about one. Of course not evidence based but more in real life. All these health scares are not as common as many think they are. I do realize that even in one case you don't want it to be your dog. Example: I am not cutting of his tail because he might injure it someday, same as having a prostate. Just because it can get cancerous, it should be removed? Just my take.
Behavior wise: train, manage and exercise these boys, just like human teens. The most annoying dogs that my intact male encountered were neutered males and fighting breeds (regardless of gender or sexual status). The intact ones did some postering but they both decided "nah..." and moved on. That has been my experience in Europe as well, where most dogs were left intact.
Neuter or not, it is a topic that will always be debated.
 
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