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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering buying a couple of beef trachea chews for my 6-month puppy. After some quick research, they appear to be teeth friendly and may have some benefits.


Just wondering what others have experienced with them. My goal is to stick with teeth friendly chews that aren't unhealthy. I have plenty of the Kong-type chews and about every stuff-a-treat chew imaginable. Just looking for options that she might get more enthused about.


 

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I don't find dehydrated things to digest well. Often see them in their poop. But I also see the cartilage from fresh tracheas as well. If the trachea is thin enough for them to crunch, it will be fine.
 

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Mine absolutely love trachea tubes. The square slices "chips" will be crunched and gone in about 30 seconds, but the tubes last much longer.
 

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I feed them and even my sensitive boy does fine with them. He is a thoughtful chewer and not an inhaler so this might help because he does chew it up pretty well as he eats it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lamb horns are good too. But they stink terribly.
I had to check my understanding on horns versus antlers. (Googled it). I gave Cassie some antlers, when she still had her puppy teeth, but I've since discarded them. The lamb horns sound like something I'll buy and try with Cassie, since they seem to be teeth friendly and digestible.

The stinkier a treat is, the more Cassie likes it. She has only exhibited some possessive behavior a couple of times, and that was with something stinky. I'll have to restrict bringing any lamb horns into the bedroom, LOL and maybe a dental chew for better breath after she chews one.

My prior dog cracked a tooth. I didn't notice it until it got infected. We ended up visiting a doggie dentist and had to have several teeth extracted (large vet's bill). I'm taking extra care with Cassie's teeth and doing my best to prevent damage to her teeth.
 

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Is there a lot of difference between the material in a lamb horn vs. a cow hoof? I feed my dogs cow hooves and they smell horrible but don't cause tooth problems, and are of a similar soft hard cartilage material as a lamb horn. But probably 95% less expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is there a lot of difference between the material in a lamb horn vs. a cow hoof? I feed my dogs cow hooves and they smell horrible but don't cause tooth problems, and are of a similar soft hard cartilage material as a lamb horn. But probably 95% less expensive.
The hoofs are definitely less expensive. I think they may be harder than lamb horns. A lot depends on your dog's chewing habits, as to what might be safe for your particular dog, but not for others. A light to medium chewer could be safe with some chew items (with supervision), while heavy chewers could have the potential for problems with some chews.

I read a recent article, about a dog who had an intestinal blockage from cow hoof segments he swallowed. The poor dog passed a couple days after surgery. The dog was found to, also, have salmonella. The owner said the dog found the hoof and that he had not recently given the dog a hoof (although he had in the past). Perhaps the hoof was buried/hidden somewhere and could have developed salmonella after purchase. A sad situation.

I understand that cow hoofs are more of a durable item. You might find the excerpt below from this link helpful
(https://www.dogtrainingnation.com/health/cow-hooves-for-dogs/

Cow Hoof Chew Safety

Cow hooves are best for moderate chewers, so use with extreme caution for power chewers. Light chewers will likely get bored with these chews because they’re so tough.

Always supervise your dog when she’s chewing on any type of toy or chew even if your dog has chewed these items before. Every 10 minutes or so, walk over and trade the cow hoof for a piece of hot dog or cheese. Playing this dog game gives you the opportunity to inspect the chew for splinters, large chunks or sharp edges. The trade game also prevents resource guarding and teaches your dog good manners. During the break, take a moment to check your dog’s mouth and gums for bleeding or chipped teeth.

Once a cow hoof has been chewed to a small nugget, it’s best to throw it out to prevent your dog from swallowing the last piece. Any dog chew can be harmful, so supervision is key.
 
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