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I used to breed goats. Bought some breeding stock before I really knew what I was doing and regretted it later. My advice would be don't get any dogs you intend to breed before you take steps to learn from others, if that makes sense. Unless you have room ability and willingness to keep them and not use them in your program if they don't pan out.
 

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parrotlets (all kinds of colors), green cheeks (turquoise, pineapple, yellow sided, normals), sun conures (my favorite), Quakers (blue, green, pallids), parakeets, peach faced lovebirds, cockatiels (mainly whiteface mutations). Keep wondering if I am missing anyone?

Believe me it sounds like a lot and at one point there where a lot of birds (had a pair of parrotlets that would eat all their vegetables but not their peas) funny reminded me of kids.

I grew fresh veggies, sprouted for them just to mention a few things. It has been a while. My husband's health slowed things to a near halt and now mine has made it complete.

I learned a whole lot being under-someone who really did her research and learned from her not to mention the local pet store lady was also wonderful helping when I wasn't sure of something. Taking their experience and adding my own really helped me to not make some mistakes that could have been very bad had I not learned so much before starting. I started with a pair of cockatiels and slowly as I learned more added different ones.

Made sure I had brooders to keep the babies warm when pulled, enough moisture in the brooder to keep them healthier. And NEVER EVER EVER bought any stock I did not know was perfectly safe. There are so many airborne germs and diereses enough to drive a person crazy.

If you even have birds in different rooms if they share a central ac unit guess what you are still exposing your birds during quarantine time. I still could never ever had done it if it wasn't for my oldest daughter she loved the parrotlets so I gave them to her to help me with feedings so I could still get out once in a while. I would trust her with a prized baby bird hand feeding without worry. She really picked it up well and it is not easy hand feeding baby parrotlets. Think parakeet and think smaller much smaller.

My friend spent literately years teaching me as I went also something always arises and there is nothing like having someone you can call no matter what time it is to just be sure you are thinking on the right lines. I have learned to tube feed (I DO NOT LIKE IT BUT WHEN YOU FIND YOUR FEMALE EGG BOUND AND EXHAUSTED you first hydrate her then tube feed her a little food to get her energy up) Things where always easier when it was a bird I raised because mine would take food from the syringe. Then after much prayer and time to regain strength I got her un-eggbound. Again something that happens at 2 am.

Bought several avian vet books not the kind you can just pick up in a store. Been to see GIANT bird breeding facilities, while they where keeping everything clean and such I would NEVER allow myself to get that big, Babies need more one on one time to really be sweet and tame and you cannot get it if there is no time for it. Was also lucky enough to have vistied a man who had prized cockatiels with walls of awards on his walls. Would have loved to have learned a thing or two back in his day when he was in his prime.

I sure did enjoy all the birds that came and went and all the happy families that came and went as well. Had a person who bought a cockatiel from me after having a tame cockatiel die call me up 2 or 3 days later telling me she just couldn't believe how tame my baby was but she said she didn't think I would do well breeding because I was so attached to them I told her no I am just going to be picky who I am willing to sell to and have been known to tell someone no before. The birds had a right to be in a good home and I had a responsibility to do the best I could do to see that that happened.

It is nice to know if I ever wanted to I could raise one straight out of the nest if I wanted to, but I will never ever ever again take one out at 3 weeks again. Did that once against the advice of my friend because too much was happening over here and it was hard on the baby and me seeing her scared and I wouldn't put a baby through that again.
 
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