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Went in to the vet today because Xena’s neck had a patch of hair missing and the skin was black. So far so good they said possibly the collar rubbing and to just monitor it. But...... she has a fractured tooth, he said doesn’t look too deep and to also just monitor for color change and we will do X-rays if needed. So no more Nyla bones for her, which are her favorite things ever. I was just going to invest in a monthly subscription to bulkybox too (might still do that and go with not so hard toys).

Anyone have experience with fractured teeth that turn out fine and don’t cost a ton of $$$?
 

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I would consult a dental vet. Seems major to me as it looks like the pulp his exposed. Hopefully the tooth can be saved by sealing?
 

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Some of my girl's front teeth are banged up like that and the one that is damaged on your dog-- mine has broken both of those and had them removed. The last one looked like yours in the picture for a bit and then she did something else and shattered it completely and there were just shards poking out of her gum

The first one cost me like $1500 to remove, and the second like $250 (different vets). Same exact tooth and same exact break, now she is symmetrically missing teeth.

Of course, my dog is old. Yours looks young judging by the other teeth.
 

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My vet (who happens to be the practice's veterinary dentist) said the odds of an incisor becoming infected are very low as it is not a major eating/biting tooth. My girl chipped one of hers. It hasn't been pulled yet and doesn't seem to bother her at all. If you have a low cost clinic, you could call and see if they do dental extractions. Usually those will run about $250, I think, depending on the complexity of the tooth (Canines have longer roots, etc). A board certified vet dentist wanted $2k to repair, $1700 to remove here in MD.
 
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She is 13 months old. I think we will just wait and see how it plays out. Here’s a better picture (different angle). She is a destructive chewer any ideas on toys now that im leery of her making it worse! lol.

Oh my, that needs to be fixed. If it gets infected you will face much higher bills.
 

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That's a pretty bad break and I'd consider having it removed. When we took Zoey in to have a root canal and crown done on her lower canine the dentist found a broken tooth (same tooth opposite side as yours) and on the X-ray it showed a dark circular area around the root. The dark area was a sign of previous infection due to the breakage. The way it was explained to me is that a broken tooth with pulp exposure is an open passage and infection is likely.

This link describes what typically takes place.
http://www.toothvet.ca/PDFfiles/pulp_exposure.pdf
 

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When there is a break that has an open canal to the root, it must be fixed. If your vet feels this is ok to leave alone, get a new vet. Infected teeth can result in heart disease or broke jaws. The bacteria can travel straight to the blood stream and affect overall health. Dogs mask pain very well and rest assured exposed pulp is very painful. Please see a dental surgeon and have repaired.
 

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This is why insurance is almost a must with these dogs. It has saved me thousands of dollars over the years. The GSDs are so intense that they are more accident prone than some other mellower breeds.
 

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I asked a friend of mine who is a vet tech for his thoughts regarding broken and chipped teeth. He does all the teeth cleaning for a large veterinary practice. He said that unless the dog is exhibiting clear signs of discomfort or pain, or unless the owner persists, they do nothing. He also said that in a case where the pulp might be exposed that there is some self healing that will take place. Of course it won't regenerate a tooth.
 

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There are specialized procedures to save teeth and avoid extraction that are only available from a vet dentist. It's actually pretty amazing what specialty dentistry can do now. GPs are fine if you just want a cleaning and/or extraction, but they are not trained in you to do much with teeth besides that -- often, if you want to save the tooth, you need a specialist.


The sealing procedure for chips and small tip breaks is very inexpensive and can avoid major surgery later if it's done quickly enough -- but it's only offered by specialists. Playing the wait-and-see game takes away that possibility, as it has to be done soon after the break. On the other hand, root canals can be done later to avoid extractions (though they are VERY expensive -- over $1500...and possibly double that, depending what part of the country you live in).



I go to the vet dentist for tooth injuries because there's a bigger range of options. It's a much bigger bill, but I want to know all the recommended treatment options, not just extraction or "wait and see" offered by a general practice clinic. If we decide to extract, the regular vet can do that, but often there's a better option.
 

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Oof! That other angle - really looks like a bad break. It could just be the lighting, but I would definitely look for a second opinion on that one. Can you put pressure on it without a reaction? I've had a broken tooth before and know how sensitive it can be - even hot and cold is painful.
 

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When there is a break that has an open canal to the root, it must be fixed. If your vet feels this is ok to leave alone, get a new vet. Infected teeth can result in heart disease or broke jaws. The bacteria can travel straight to the blood stream and affect overall health. Dogs mask pain very well and rest assured exposed pulp is very painful. Please see a dental surgeon and have repaired.
My now deceased GSD, Becca was good as masking pain. She didn't show signs of a dental problem, until she had facial swelling. At that point, she had an infection and had to have several teeth extracted. It was a big bill. With my personal situation, my lesson learned was that I plan to be proactive with dental care for my puppy Cassie. If I had been aware of the original tooth problem, that started a domino effect, both my dog and I would have fared beter.
 

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My now deceased GSD, Becca was good as masking pain. She didn't show signs of a dental problem, until she had facial swelling. At that point, she had an infection and had to have several teeth extracted. It was a big bill. With my personal situation, my lesson learned was that I plan to be proactive with dental care for my puppy Cassie. If I had been aware of the original tooth problem, that started a domino effect, both my dog and I would have fared beter.
A big part of having a GSD is to be willing to spend dollars. You owe it to the dog. I cringe at that picture and actually don't understand why it is even a question or a yes or no option for treatment.
 

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I asked a friend of mine who is a vet tech for his thoughts regarding broken and chipped teeth. He does all the teeth cleaning for a large veterinary practice. He said that unless the dog is exhibiting clear signs of discomfort or pain, or unless the owner persists, they do nothing. He also said that in a case where the pulp might be exposed that there is some self healing that will take place. Of course it won't regenerate a tooth.
Having a dog with fractured canines, I beg to differ with that opinion. Does this vet tech truly believe it’s best to wait for a blood infection or heart damage?
 

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Having a dog with fractured canines, I beg to differ with that opinion. Does this vet tech truly believe it’s best to wait for a blood infection or heart damage?
Seems the vets beg to differ with you.

Through the years I also have had dogs and cats with broken teeth. I never had a vet be concerned with it and I never had any issues with the dogs or cats over it.

I would bet a lot of dogs go happily through life with broken teeth and the owners are none the wiser.
 

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Seems the vets beg to differ with you.

Through the years I also have had dogs and cats with broken teeth. I never had a vet be concerned with it and I never had any issues with the dogs or cats over it.

I would bet a lot of dogs go happily through life with broken teeth and the owners are none the wiser.
There are broken teeth and then there are broken teeth. Pulp exposed needs to be dealt with appropriately and according to my dogs dental surgeon, irresponsible to leave a dog with a fractured tooth that revealed pulp initially. It’s easy to disregard as the pulp does shrink, the open canal remains open.

To each their own, I prefer to not leave my dogs in pain (they mask it well) and risk blood infections, broken jaw or heart damage.
 

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There are broken teeth and then there are broken teeth. Pulp exposed needs to be dealt with appropriately and according to my dogs dental surgeon, irresponsible to leave a dog with a fractured tooth that revealed pulp initially. It’s easy to disregard as the pulp does shrink, the open canal remains open.

To each their own, I prefer to not leave my dogs in pain (they mask it well) and risk blood infections, broken jaw or heart damage.

To each their own but a broken or chipped tooth is by no means a guarantee of pain or discomfort. I know enough people that had broken or chipped a tooth, especially in childhood, and pain and discomfort was not an issue. Such things were repaired for cosmetic reasons and boys often chose not to get them fixed at all.

Regardless, I pay good money to the many veterinarians I have seen through the years for their medical expertise. I can choose to have faith in their training or I can choose to get medical advice from an online forum.
 

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I asked a friend of mine who is a vet tech for his thoughts regarding broken and chipped teeth. He does all the teeth cleaning for a large veterinary practice. He said that unless the dog is exhibiting clear signs of discomfort or pain, or unless the owner persists, they do nothing. He also said that in a case where the pulp might be exposed that there is some self healing that will take place. Of course it won't regenerate a tooth.

A vet tech is not a dental specialist. He is the vet's assistant and doesn't have the expertise that a dental vet has. You may very well be giving a false sense of security to the OP.
 
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