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Ive been told that the male gsd is more territorial and aggressive than the female is there any truth in this? Im going to meet a 4yr old male on Sunday, hes been brought up with kids but obviously its always a bit of a worry when you think of bringing such a large adult dog into a home of 4 kids and 2 young labradors. Is there anything i can look out for when meeting him? Opinions on differences between male and female personalities please too!! Thank you!!
 

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I have three male dogs right now, all three are neutered and I only have problems with one of them (and those issues have been present since he was 11 weeks old, long before he was sexually mature).
I like having males and have found that I have less problems in my home than some of my friends that have multiple females.
That being said, I would look at the personality of the individual dog. Is the dog that you are looking at neutered? Is he well socialized to many different people, situations and environments? How much experience does he have with other dogs? What kind of training, and how much of it, has been done with him? All of that is going to play into how well he would do in your home. Or anyone's home, for that matter.
This breed is a bit more territorial in general then say, a typical Lab. That is something that you should expect. I think that a healthy, well socialized and well trained GSD should never be "aggressive". Reserved with people they don't know, and ready to protect their people and home, yes. But not aggressive. But maybe my idea of what defines "aggressive" is different from yours?
In my experience, the females are more determined in their likes and dislikes than a neutered male. Neutering can go a long way towards shifting a male's behavior/attitude (provided training and exercise are also givens, and the negative behaviors haven't taken root and become ingrained patterns yet). Spaying a female doesn't seem to make that much of a difference to her overall behavior.
Of course, this is all just my opinion and like I said, I have more experience with males and I could be way off on the female angle.
Good luck!
Sheilah
 

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Hes not neutered yet, i would need to get that done asap as my lab bitch is too young to be neutered yet. My male lab is neutered already. I know hes not lived with other dogs but the owner says hes fine with her friends gsd and with dogs when out on a walk. She said he is territorial about his house- barks like mad when someones at the door. Hes grown up with children so hopefully will be ok with mine.
 

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I have had a female (13+) years and we have a rescue Samson, appx 18 months. Our female (spayed) was very serious and for lack of better words, had a strong sense of self. And we loved her. But she had a hard time sharing.

When we adopted Samson, I was VERY dubious. I was not crazy about a male because I was uneducated. But we were committed. And to our wonder and joy, our Samson is the most relaxed, affectionate, velcro dog that I have ever known. Our friend Liesje, has a female GSD, Kenya and she kicks his butt whenever they are together. (Kenya is wonderful BTW).

Samson is approximately 95 lbs and our neighbor has a beautiful corgi/mix rescue who is probably 25 lbs. Samson will go over to play, lay down so Annie can REACH to bit his ears, roll over on his back so she can jump on him and stay off the the patio step so she can bit at him on an elevated platform.

Of course, like other disclaimers, this is only one dog and we are pretty mellow at home. He gets a lot of attention and training and a ton of exercise. But I would never have such reservations again. NEVER.
 

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Personally, because the bitch has to be more protective of the den and pups, I think and have noticed in my bitches, much more guarding, protectiveness around my home than what I have ever seen with males.

People could come over and STEAL my boys, while my girls would EAT them. It hasn't happened -- yet. But when I have contractors over, my girls act like junk-yard dogs, while my boys just want pets.

Outside of my property, the girls are quite different, having been to classes and shows and stores, etc., most of them are aloof but not outwardly nervous or shy. They will not jump up on strangers for pets or treats, but if I say, "say 'hello'" they will generally walk up and sniff, decide it isn't anyone important and suffer themselves to be touched by strangers.

My boys on the other hand LOVE strangers. Actually, I think they know I like bitches better and are outwardly hoping for a new owner. I swear Rushie will follow anyone home that offers him a nasty milkbone dog buiscuit.

I find bitches to be much more businesslike. They do not know you, and want to know what you are up to at all times. Do not even think of messing with my car, Yayhoo! Arwen is a bit pathetic. For years she tried to make Dubya get serious about security. Dubya is like, "Him? He's not carrying away the dog food. what's the big deal?"

It away trips me when people are afraid of my dogs. When people are wary around my girls, I think, good.
 

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No.

Not unless you are introducing him into a home with dogs or dogs and bitches, I doubt it will be an issue.

In fact, Cujo, who IS neutered is much more protective of my mom and their house, than Rushie or Dubya is. Dubya is 3 1/2 and Rush is 2. Cujo is almost three.

I actually believe that neutering just stops the dog from making sperm. I do not think you get that many behavioral benefits. It is yet another of the lies that the pro-speuter people tell in their effort to eliminate dog-ownership. If you have temperament problems with a dog, then it is wise to neuter because likely if he does sire a litter, some or all of the pups may inherit the temperament problems. Neutering ensures that you do not pass it on. It generally will not improve the issues.

Whether behavior in a dog is different when neutered before sexual maturity is really an inprecise science. In every litter, the dogs have different levels of dominance and different drives. Most dogs in litters are raised in different environments, and given differing levels of training and socialization. So you really cannot even assess a litter who was neutered, when, who was not, and how do they behave, because nature or nurture may have made them that way. What is generally accepted though is that people say that neutering their male did not make a big differenc in behavior before and after.

Personnally, I would not want for the first think I do to a dog to be taking him to the vet for an operation. Kind of gets you off to a rocky begining. That is just my opinion though.

Good luck.
 

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I have found the same as a couple other posters, that on average the females are more serious, males more velcro and loving. Most Shepherds, regardless of gender, regardless of altering status will bark to alert to strangers.

I would not say that males are any more aggressive to strangers or with their families. They can be more annoying and obnoxious and like human males, a little slower to mature!


I would recommend going ahead the neutering. It's not entirely scientific but we have had a LOT of fosters and usually neuter them straight away but occasionally don't if they have heartworms and are being treated or for other medical reasons so we have done some comparing. While most of both groups are fine temperament wise, the unneutered or only recently neutered males are more likely to mark in the house, more likely to go nutso over an unaltered bitch, and more prone to starting fights other unneutered males.
 

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Originally Posted By: shaydenebonyIve been told that the male gsd is more territorial and aggressive than the female is there any truth in this? Im going to meet a 4yr old male on Sunday, hes been brought up with kids but obviously its always a bit of a worry when you think of bringing such a large adult dog into a home of 4 kids and 2 young labradors. Is there anything i can look out for when meeting him? Opinions on differences between male and female personalities please too!! Thank you!!
I have found the exact opposite. I have had a dozen males. I currently have 2 males and 1 female and she is the most intense dog I`ve had. She is more aloof, alert, independent and territorial than any male I`ve ever owned. She is my first and only female.
 

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Right all bets are off if you are making them live with other dogs/bitches, speutered or not. Best to be safe than sorry. Multiple intact animals are a trip. At least, it is not for the feint of heart.
 

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I love the boys and I haven't really had any issues and if there is a scuff usually a word is all it takes for them to listen. The boys are love bugs and pretty easy going. They will let me know if someone is here. I also believe that the females are more serious & protective. But there are exceptions to every rule.
I have friends that have male and female dogs not spayed or neutered and my boys are fine when they come to visit. I guess we have a lot of traffic here and anything goes with my boys. Its a pretty laid back atmosphere here on the farm and I believe that the animals pick up on that.

Good luck with your new boy and I know I would love to see some pictures of him.
 

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The guys I've had have been more mellow than my girls.
 

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My male is very very mellow compared to my girl, he has not got an aggressive bone in his body. Although my girl is also not aggessive she is much much more alert, and her ears are almost always to attention listening to things
 

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Our female is very serious and seriously UNinterested in making friends. She is quite happy in a world that includes us and nobody else. She has aggression issues that we have worked on for years. Our males on the other hand...sweet hearts. The newest guy (all have been adopted from shelter/rescue) is a happy go lucky lets play kind of guy.
I too advise introducing your dogs on neutral territory and watching them carefully afterwards for a few days. Also, even after neutering it takes a while (2 weeks or so?) for the hormone level to drop. So you might see mounting behavior etc during that time.
 

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I've had both male and females......In my humble opinion the female was more territorial and more aggressive. The males that I have had were more passive and less tense. Females see to have an extra protective measure in their makeup, perhaps it's the nurturing/protective motherhood that is in the female gender, don't know for sure the reason.
 

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Originally Posted By: pupresqI would not say that males are any more aggressive to strangers or with their families. They can be more annoying and obnoxious and like human males, a little slower to mature!
 

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Originally Posted By: shaydenebonyBecause hes 4yrs old and not yet neutered will this make any difference to how he behaves do you think?
No, I don't think this will make any difference in his behavior....I do recommend neutering him though, it will prevent cancer , roaming and fathering unwanted neighboring dogs. 4 year olds are great, they are still "puppies" in their behavior as they are still pretty active......I've noticed that when they turn 5-6 they start to calm down more. Enjoy him and let us know how it turns out.
 
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