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Discussion Starter #1
So my puppy started biting my pant leg and I always redirect her and tell her NO. this morning she launched herself at my PJ's (leg) and grabbed on. OUCH! Ripped my PJ leg and I slapped her snout and she did cry. OMG.... I felt like the most horrible person on earth. She sat there stunned, surprised her more than anything.
She slowly followed me into the living room and I played with her and did some belly scratches.
The GUILT! She's just a baby. Hope she doesn't hold it against me.
 

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Yes I have done that. Felt awful after. He was 5 moths old, I had just gotten him and jumping and snapping was an issue. He caught my breast, hard. Knee jerk reaction as it hurt...a lot.

Just move on, you can't change that it happened. Keep on with the positive stuff and it will pay off.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's how my pup learned bite inhibition on me in one incident. She'll be fine as long as you don't make a habit of smacking her, hopefully lesson learned.
No, I don't make a habit of it, but she didn't learn from it either:| Back to grabbing my pants legs. But I'm getting her on a rag or toys instead - I know this stage will pass.
 

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Yes.

If it's just a one time thing they will be more confused by what just had happen than being hurt by your action.

Plus we all make mistakes. They also have few accidents after they already understand to go potty outside. Etc. Nobody is perfect. Not us. Not even them.
 

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I have reacted in a reflex when I was greeted with a puncture wound by a 4 month old male pup and thought it was overboard but the results were pretty good; the end of landsharking.
 

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Valor jumped on and knocked over my 11 year old daughter once. Once. He was about 75 pounds and she is 52. She got up and physically threw him out of her room and slammed the door right in his perplexed face. I am not advocating hitting a dog, ever, but sometimes when they push too far they get an equal and opposite reaction without thought going into it..one of the Universes lessons. As long as it is not your "method" or frequent..in other words it happened once or twice, I do not think it does anything harmful. And sometimes it hammers the point home.

No they are not kids, but in a a lot of ways the whole system still works. "Mom, he hit me! Why what were you doing? Knocking over his blocks. Well it was hardly worth it then, was it?"
 

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sure, lately more than ever and I don't like it. If I am really tired from working and they have been napping, they will want to play while I want to just chill. I sound annoyed when I tell them no, especially when they keep insisting that a nice walk or game will be fun! It is mostly bewilderment on their part, trying to figure out why I sound so cross. I try to catch my breath and offer some token play, just to make up for it, but they eventually have to accept the fact that I'm just not in the mood to play right then. (and then I get annoyed that I was annoyed...no win there).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
We are trying to curb the land sharking right now. She is doing really well with my husband but not me for some reason. I watch him and I do the same thing but the pup just gets more worked up with me???
She starts biting on him and he just gives her a little pat on her snout/face. NOT hard, it's not a "hit", just a tap with a "no" and she stops right away and goes for a toy that he gives her.
 

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Some dogs treat one gender differently than the other. They are not bounds by the laws of political correctness lol I have had dogs that respond way better to a man's booming NO than mine.

Watch your husband's body language. Maybe have him roll video on you trying to correct it so you can spot body language and hear your tone. I'm going to say he shouldn't be tapping her on the nose as a method.

When I first got Valor he was 5 months and over 70 pounds. He jumped on me and nipped at my face gleefully. I took advice I got here and from my trainer to step into him. Didn't really work. I'm 4'11 by the way.
Then I had success by having a kong ready for his "jump triggers"..being let out of his crate, me coming home after being out, etc. That worked! Until..no Kong. SO I just had to go with improving my body language and tone, and continued walking into his space and completely ignoring him until he was calm. Eventually it worked and he doesn't do it anymore. What is important is they DON'T get what they want for the show and biting..attention. So I would have an upright posture, when he jumped and snapped I pushed him away and said NO then stone cold ignored him and body checked him until he stopped. Once he was merely circling around me I would run him through a few commands then pet him if he was sitting. My way took time. My daughter's defensive full assault took one time lol

I'm not a trainer but I am not so sure about the redirecting the way you are doing it. She bites you...she gets toy and play time. I view redirecting as noticing it is ABOUT to happen and then channeling them in to a better choice. Which is what I did with the Kong. It did work until the Kong was not present. Part of the issue is my dog is not toy driven. He liked the Kong because we played together with it. He is more attention praise driven than toy driven. They are individuals that you just have to get to know I guess :)
 

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No. They are dogs. Anything they do is something we have allowed. But I have raised my voice. Sometimes it works, sometimes not. The nice thing about dogs is that they are forgiving. Train yours to behave the ways you want her to and stop beating yourself up about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have talked with my husband to stop tapping her nose and he agreed not to. I wasn't feeling comfortable with that anyway but I had no other options for him since nothing was working great for me either. Saying, OUCH does work with her. I think when she's CRAZY out of control type, she's mentally tired and I will just crate her then with a chew toy. We'll get this. She's been a different one for sure. My Malinois were all extremely mouthy but were extremely toy motivated so a tug was like candy to them so it was easy to get them biting on a tug. The other Shepherds were just not super mouthy. This one has her mouth open all the time except for when she's asleep, or just waking up or on her way going to sleep. Even on leash walks, I'm constantly trying to keep leash out of her mouth.
 
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