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What the title said.
Please describe your experience, how the recovery went, and how much time was gained from surgery.
 

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My friend did it for his dog and she lived two more years.
 

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For a friend's GSD, one horrible month. The surgery did not go well, healing was slow, and when he finally started feeling less miserable, he began massively bleeding out internally and had to be euthanized. The necropsy found hemangiosarcoma everywhere, even though there was no obvious cancer in his abdomen outside the spleen when the splenectomy was done.

By the time hemangiosarcoma is found, it has almost certainly spread microscopically at least.

I'm assuming that you are not talking about "prophylactic" splenectomy in the hope of preventing hemangiosarcoma. This once seemed like a good idea, but we now know that it is futile because hemangiosarcoma starts with a certain type of stem cell in the bone marrow. If it doesn't have a spleen to land on, it will land somewhere else like the heart.
 

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It's a nasty disease. Chemo after surgery -- about 6 months. I forget what it cost. It was either euthanize her then or go with surgery. Considering what 6 months is in a dog's life, compared to human lives --- that's quite a bit of time.
 

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My working line girl's grandfather was diagnosed at 10 years of age. He was doing so well after the initial bleed and diagnosis, that his owner/breeder decided to have the vet operate. Ultrasound suggested it MIGHT be confined to the spleen.

She had to crowdfund the surgery, but went ahead with it.

The ultrasound was wrong. He was full of cancer, and the vet euthanized him on the table. :crying::crying:

IMO, it's not worth it. It's a horrible disease, and even with treatment, you will only get a very short time with your dog.

I'm sorry! :hug:
 

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I didn't do chemo. I didn't want her going through that.

Recovery was really quick for mine after surgery. I couldn't keep her down. She was a blue heeler though. Tough as nails.
 

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Things to consider:

You need to knock off about 1 month, because the first month postop is often not pretty.

The heart can be covered with flat hemangiosarcoma tumors that will NOT show up on ultrasound. In which case the dog will probably not live more than a few weeks.

Are you usually with your dog, so that when he starts bleeding out again he will not die a horrible death waiting for you to come home?

Every dog is different, and we have no way to predict how an individual dog will do after splenectomy.

As always, the question is, is it worth it to the dog? And the answer is different for different dogs and different situations.

Hemangiosarcoma is a horror, and it is becoming more and more common, in more and more breeds, and at younger and younger ages.
 

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We had less than one month from time she first got sick, to when she was officially diagnosed (because her bloodwork presented so weirdly) to when she died.

She died the day after I took her out to play frisbee with her. My friend lost her dog the day after she let him run and do a little bitework for fun. My vet confirmed there is a correlation between activity and death. Which makes sense given it's a blood vessel cancer, increased activity= increased blood flow

I think the key to this cancer, much like the key to human blood cancers, will be immunotherapy.
 

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For a friend's GSD, one horrible month. The surgery did not go well, healing was slow, and when he finally started feeling less miserable, he began massively bleeding out internally and had to be euthanized. The necropsy found hemangiosarcoma everywhere, even though there was no obvious cancer in his abdomen outside the spleen when the splenectomy was done.

By the time hemangiosarcoma is found, it has almost certainly spread microscopically at least.

I'm assuming that you are not talking about "prophylactic" splenectomy in the hope of preventing hemangiosarcoma. This once seemed like a good idea, but we now know that it is futile because hemangiosarcoma starts with a certain type of stem cell in the bone marrow. If it doesn't have a spleen to land on, it will land somewhere else like the heart.
Among other things, this is exactly why when my dog was diagnosed we did not do the surgery. The vets said the tunor was so big and invading vital organs, the chance of him bleeding out on the table was very high.

We did not operate. We loaded him up on tramodol and he had a really good month. He ate cheeseburgers every day, he did anything he wanted to do and whatever was safe for him to do that he loved we made sure it happened. He was truly happy.

And the next time he crashed we put him down to spare him any more suffering and he died in mine in my husbands arms.

I don't regret anything
 

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Among other things, this is exactly why when my dog was diagnosed we did not do the surgery. The vets said the tunor was so big and invading vital organs, the chance of him bleeding out on the table was very high.

We did not operate. We loaded him up on tramodol and he had a really good month. He ate cheeseburgers every day, he did anything he wanted to do and whatever was safe for him to do that he loved we made sure it happened. He was truly happy.

And the next time he crashed we put him down to spare him any more suffering and he died in mine in my husbands arms.

I don't regret anything
Same. I was told if it was caught sooner when there were less and smaller tumors, the surgery would've been a very good option. They could've cut the pieces off the liver and/or part of the liver. He might've had a much longer end of life...we're talking more than a year. But the cancer took over too much of the liver and had spread to the neighboring organs including the spleen. Not to mention, he was very weak and he may not have survived surgery.

Chemo would've given him an extra month. Not worth it especially since he was already declining fast.

So I was given Cerenia for his vomiting and "several months." He only made it 2 months before I had to make the decision.

I DO have regrets but they have nothing to do with the surgery or the chemo.
 

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We had less than one month from time she first got sick, to when she was officially diagnosed (because her bloodwork presented so weirdly) to when she died.

She died the day after I took her out to play frisbee with her. My friend lost her dog the day after she let him run and do a little bitework for fun. My vet confirmed there is a correlation between activity and death. Which makes sense given it's a blood vessel cancer, increased activity= increased blood flow

I think the key to this cancer, much like the key to human blood cancers, will be immunotherapy.
I remember them telling us we had to keep my guy really quiet. I also remember the vet saying one little bump could kill him. But, he had already had a big bleed which stopped because it had filled some cavity and the pressure of it had stopped the bleed, so I'm not sure if they were referring to that specifically

He did take some gentle walks and I even let him play with one of my boarders who he had a huge crush on. That day I decided, this is what he really wants to do. If it kills him, at least he died happy. He had a few more weeks after that before the bleed when we euthanized him but I wouldn't have regretted it if he had died that day. We let him walk off the leash and if he ambled somewhere we went with him...basically whatever he felt like. The hemangio foster I had was the same. The day he wanted to go walking was the second day I'd brought him home so I kept him on the leash because we barely knew each other. but I just let him wander and wherever he went I followed. He ambled around for about 30 mins and he seemed happy.

On my dog's bucket list---steal from the counter and not get in trouble. He definitely knew we were not doing rules anymore. I made him a kong and then stepped into the other room to do something. He stole it off the counter and took it in the other room. as far as stealing goes....it was for him anyway.... and oh how he thumped his tail at me with that gleeful look on his face. Ha ha, I took it, and you aren't going to do ANYTHING! First and only time he counter surfed in his life.
 
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