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Hey, I'm wondering if anyone else on this forum has any experience with Australian Shepherds, and or know of any Australian Shepherd forums. I can't find any expect one. I plan on getting another Aussie when my Standard Poodle is around 4.
 

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There is no active forum that I know of but I have been considering one for my next dog. Also looking at field labs and ACDs. A friend has had three of them and every one had traits I liked. The first two were rescues, but she finally got a puppy from a breeder and that dog is incredible. She has horses so the dogs need to be able to go on long trail rides, off leash and stay away from snakes, not spook the horses they run into and generally get along with a lot of people at the stable. They have been such a good breed for her, I actually started looking at breeders. But I haven’t decided yet. My next dog will also function as a service dog on an as needed basis and possibly a therapy dog. Much as I love GSDs, the kinds of dogs I like best aren’t suited for that. It will be a huge change for me because I’ve only had GSDs since I was young, and one other herding breed early on.
 

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There is no active forum that I know of but I have been considering one for my next dog. Also looking at field labs and ACDs. A friend has had three of them and every one had traits I liked. The first two were rescues, but she finally got a puppy from a breeder and that dog is incredible. She has horses so the dogs need to be able to go on long trail rides, off leash and stay away from snakes, not spook the horses they run into and generally get along with a lot of people at the stable. They have been such a good breed for her, I actually started looking at breeders. But I haven’t decided yet. My next dog will also function as a service dog on an as needed basis and possibly a therapy dog. Much as I love GSDs, the kinds of dogs I like best aren’t suited for that. It will be a huge change for me because I’ve only had GSDs since I was young, and one other herding breed early on.
Awwww😔okay, thank you. I think someone should make a forum for them! Awesome!! Any good Aussie is incredible and should be able to do any type of work. I highly recommend one. Even only after having just one so far.
 

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There is no active forum that I know of but I have been considering one for my next dog. Also looking at field labs and ACDs. A friend has had three of them and every one had traits I liked. The first two were rescues, but she finally got a puppy from a breeder and that dog is incredible. She has horses so the dogs need to be able to go on long trail rides, off leash and stay away from snakes, not spook the horses they run into and generally get along with a lot of people at the stable. They have been such a good breed for her, I actually started looking at breeders. But I haven’t decided yet. My next dog will also function as a service dog on an as needed basis and possibly a therapy dog. Much as I love GSDs, the kinds of dogs I like best aren’t suited for that. It will be a huge change for me because I’ve only had GSDs since I was young, and one other herding breed early on.
Not to derail but if you're wanting therapy/service dogs I'd probably nix ACDs off your list unless you're going to get a 3+ year old adult or you know a specific breeder who produces healthy dogs thta excell in those roles and those roles specifically. Not they had one or two puppies out of 20 that were able to it. You're far more likely to be able to use/find a well bred GSD or field lab for either of those roles than an ACD.

To OP specifically,

As far as aussies I've had some experience with them. More as friends/family members dogs though. They tend to be a lot better than some of the other herding breeds as pets. I see far less of them rehomed than other herding breeds when they are purchased as pets. In some lines there can be issues with dog reactivity/aggression (showlines or working lines). And of course nipping behaviors that may need to be trained away from.

I'd suggest looking for good facebook groups. I've found there's a lot of resources on facebook if you can find a good group that isn't all fur moms who want purebred dogs while thinking you should adopt and not shop. Feel free to pm me if you want to discuss it any more.
 

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There is no active forum that I know of but I have been considering one for my next dog. Also looking at field labs and ACDs. A friend has had three of them and every one had traits I liked. The first two were rescues, but she finally got a puppy from a breeder and that dog is incredible. She has horses so the dogs need to be able to go on long trail rides, off leash and stay away from snakes, not spook the horses they run into and generally get along with a lot of people at the stable. They have been such a good breed for her, I actually started looking at breeders. But I haven’t decided yet. My next dog will also function as a service dog on an as needed basis and possibly a therapy dog. Much as I love GSDs, the kinds of dogs I like best aren’t suited for that. It will be a huge change for me because I’ve only had GSDs since I was young, and one other herding breed early on.
Get an ACD, you will love it. They are clowns and comedians with strong drive but not over the top drive. Have you joined any of the many ACD groups on Facebook? Try some out and see what other owners have to say about them. Out of all my dogs, who are well bred, the little ACD is the one that has quickly moved into my go everywhere slot over the lot of them. She would be far better suited for service and therapy work.

A lot of people mix ACDs with other unsuitable breeds trying to toughen them up with poor results. Stick to purebred dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ACDs are adorable! I don't know much about them though. What are they like and how are they compared to Aussies?
 

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Get an ACD, you will love it. They are clowns and comedians with strong drive but not over the top drive. Have you joined any of the many ACD groups on Facebook? Try some out and see what other owners have to say about them. Out of all my dogs, who are well bred, the little ACD is the one that has quickly moved into my go everywhere slot over the lot of them. She would be far better suited for service and therapy work.

A lot of people mix ACDs with other unsuitable breeds trying to toughen them up with poor results. Stick to purebred dogs.
They sound like great dogs😍
 

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Not to derail but if you're wanting therapy/service dogs I'd probably nix ACDs off your list unless you're going to get a 3+ year old adult or you know a specific breeder who produces healthy dogs thta excell in those roles and those roles specifically. Not they had one or two puppies out of 20 that were able to it. You're far more likely to be able to use/find a well bred GSD or field lab for either of those roles than an ACD.

To OP specifically,

As far as aussies I've had some experience with them. More as friends/family members dogs though. They tend to be a lot better than some of the other herding breeds as pets. I see far less of them rehomed than other herding breeds when they are purchased as pets. In some lines there can be issues with dog reactivity/aggression (showlines or working lines). And of course nipping behaviors that may need to be trained away from.

I'd suggest looking for good facebook groups. I've found there's a lot of resources on facebook if you can find a good group that isn't all fur moms who want purebred dogs while thinking you should adopt and not shop. Feel free to pm me if you want to discuss it any more.
I don't know if things have changed or not, but when my Aussie was about 5 there were a lot in rescues because people couldn't handle them, but I'm very happy to see that that has changed. Oh, yeah, that's true!

I don't like Facebook😖 but I will still PM you😁
 

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I don't know if things have changed or not, but when my Aussie was about 5 there were a lot in rescues because people couldn't handle them, but I'm very happy to see that that has changed. Oh, yeah, that's true!

I don't like Facebook😖 but I will still PM you😁
I wouldn’t assume much has changed... could have to do with geographical differences. California definitely gets its share of aussies, cattle dogs, border collies and crosses in our shelters and rescues.
 

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I wouldn’t assume much has changed... could have to do with geographical differences. California definitely gets its share of aussies, cattle dogs, border collies and crosses in our shelters and rescues.
Okay, yeah. That's what I was thinking too. 💔 I wonder if when getting another Aussie if I should get a rescue. I'm thinking about it. I still want to breed them preserve the breed too, because a lot of them aren't as healthy as the used to be and have shorter lifespans. I'm from Florida, and there's a lot of them on the East Coast in rescues.
 

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Okay, yeah. That's what I was thinking too. 💔 I wonder if when getting another Aussie if I should get a rescue. I'm thinking about it. I still want to breed them preserve the breed too, because a lot of them aren't as healthy as the used to be and have shorter lifespans. I'm from Florida, and there's a lot of them on the East Coast in rescues.
Dogs land in rescues most often because people don’t know how to train, exercise or own herding breeds. They need a lot of exercise, training and mental stimulation. Any of the breeds mentioned make very good pets as well as working dogs if the owners know what they are doing. I have had three vets tell me my WL would not make a good pet and that people are most likely to give them up before age 1. I can understand that when I see how most people treat their pets. They give them no training, or very little, no exercise and no attention then wonder why the dog shreds its bedding, counter surfs or jumps on people. At age 4 he is the most well trained and well behaved dog I’ve ever own and one of the mellowest, where at 7 months he was the most difficult.
 

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I don't know if things have changed or not, but when my Aussie was about 5 there were a lot in rescues because people couldn't handle them, but I'm very happy to see that that has changed. Oh, yeah, that's true!

I don't like Facebook😖 but I will still PM you😁
Compared to other herding breeds I don't see as many in shelters or being rehomed. I'm on a lot of facebook pet rehoming groups or was before facebook cracked down on them. Aussies were definitely the least likely to be rehomed out of the other herding breeds. Saw far more GSDs rehomed than aussies and there are lots of aussies around here. The MAS and mini development really helped because then there was more of a pet breeding with a focus on aussies. Even if some of those breeders aren't very good or ethical.
 

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ACDs are adorable! I don't know much about them though. What are they like and how are they compared to Aussies?
I've had a few over the years. I like them. I think people who get them because they are adorable are in for a rude awakening. They are tough, energetic dogs. Not nutty energetic but they NEED outlets. They have zero issues with turning on the fight if they are pushed. This is a breed that was meant to work stock, hard stock. They can and will work all day. One of mine came off a Wyoming cattle ranch, one off a North Dakota cattle ranch. Huge places where they earned their keep. The third was the best horse dog I have ever seen, and that is a skill.
Intelligent, loyal, fearless. Not necessarily biddable but not hard to train if you work with them. I hate seeing them in pet homes, especially with rookie owners. I have not seen it end well very often. All of mine were stock dogs and I adored them, but I have to be honest they really disliked it between jobs. I used to do ranch work and we moved around a lot. I rodeoed between jobs. They were cool with it but preferred the work. They can get pushy so they need owners who can handle them. I have only had the three and a couple of crosses, I think two fosters. So I'm sure other people have more knowledge.
As you know I am really not a fan of Aussies, I don't view them as working dogs. They are sort of in the same spot as Shelties in my mind. They are herders in the loosest sense of the word. I just never really met one that was a working dog, and the whole name thing irritates me. LOL. They are cute, smart, fun dogs I guess. So again like Shelties.
I have never owned one, so I wouldn't take my opinion for much.
 

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I've had a few over the years. I like them. I think people who get them because they are adorable are in for a rude awakening. They are tough, energetic dogs. Not nutty energetic but they NEED outlets. They have zero issues with turning on the fight if they are pushed. This is a breed that was meant to work stock, hard stock. They can and will work all day. One of mine came off a Wyoming cattle ranch, one off a North Dakota cattle ranch. Huge places where they earned their keep. The third was the best horse dog I have ever seen, and that is a skill.
Intelligent, loyal, fearless. Not necessarily biddable but not hard to train if you work with them. I hate seeing them in pet homes, especially with rookie owners. I have not seen it end well very often. All of mine were stock dogs and I adored them, but I have to be honest they really disliked it between jobs. I used to do ranch work and we moved around a lot. I rodeoed between jobs. They were cool with it but preferred the work. They can get pushy so they need owners who can handle them. I have only had the three and a couple of crosses, I think two fosters. So I'm sure other people have more knowledge.
As you know I am really not a fan of Aussies, I don't view them as working dogs. They are sort of in the same spot as Shelties in my mind. They are herders in the loosest sense of the word. I just never really met one that was a working dog, and the whole name thing irritates me. LOL. They are cute, smart, fun dogs I guess. So again like Shelties.
I have never owned one, so I wouldn't take my opinion for much.
It turns out the same way with Aussies😖 Wow, they sound great! Yeah, not a dog breed for rookie owners. That's cool, did you like it?


I don't know if I would ever get one though. Maybe foster, I think we would have fun together. Yeah, I remember you saying that you don't care for them. My Aussie could have easily worked on a ranch, actually, she would have loved it. I think she could have been the only Aussie you would have liked. Lol. The name irritates me too. Okay.

I have never seen a Shetland Sheepdog work at all. I would like to see one working. Just to know that it could work. I also want to see collies working too!
 

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All the herding breeds have the potential to be feisty dogs. They need good handling. But overall, Aussies are easier than German Shepherds as long as they have outlets and exercise. My friend tells everyone who has never had one before, Don't get an Aussie. But she told me after seeing me handle my male WL that an Aussie would be an easy dog for me if I decided to get one.

Shelties have been bred for the show ring for so long, I don’t know if they are still herding dogs. Other than the classification, the ones I’ve seen in the last few years behave more like Cavs.
 

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Twenty years ago or more, but both my Shelties worked stock. I wouldn't say they were gifted, lol, but the instinct was there and both lived with working stock dogs so it was a tolerable effort.
 
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