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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As you might have read from an earlier thread, I recently adopted a 1yr old GSD with a very sweet temperment and pretty mellow activity-level. I have wanted to get a pot-bellied pig for many years although I have no experience with them. I may have come across one that needs to be rehomed but first I want to make sure that...

1. My dog gets along with the pig
2. No diseases can cross onto each other
3. That a pot-bellied pig can fit in my life

If anyone has any advice or suggests resources that would be great & appreciated.

My dog:



My possible future pig:



***P.S. NO...I'm not crazy!***
 

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Honestly, that’s hilarious! I met a pet pot-bellied pig and loved her. Will the pig live inside the house or in an outside enclosure? I’m not sure how a dog and a pig would get along, but I would be worried about either of them hurting the other.

You may try to see how your dog reacts to a pig before you bring one home. Maybe have them meet through a fence so nobody can get hurt? At least that way you could see any immediate reaction, but your dog may react totally differently when you bring a pig into your home. If you do adopt the pig, I would suggest you never, ever let the dog and pig together unsupervised, no matter how comfortable they seem with each other!
 

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I probably have nothing constructive to say because pigs are absolutely not my idea of a good house pet.

But- are you sure you want to complicate things at the moment, so soon after you adopted your dog?

Pigs are mean. The revert back to "wild boar" in just a generation or so- from domestic fat pig to tusk-growing, mean, hairy beasts.

I wouldn't do it, but I don't like pigs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Honestly, that’s hilarious! I met a pet pot-bellied pig and loved her. Will the pig live inside the house or in an outside enclosure? I’m not sure how a dog and a pig would get along, but I would be worried about either of them hurting the other.

You may try to see how your dog reacts to a pig before you bring one home. Maybe have them meet through a fence so nobody can get hurt? At least that way you could see any immediate reaction, but your dog may react totally differently when you bring a pig into your home. If you do adopt the pig, I would suggest you never, ever let the dog and pig together unsupervised, no matter how comfortable they seem with each other!


Yes this is totally dependent on my dog does with this. I am in no rush. Years ago I read a book on how to raise pot-bellied pigs and one thing I remember reading is that they love to dig holes. From what the owner tells me this isn't an issue. I am going to take it very slow with introductions. Just like how I adopted my dog and saw her twice in a week before deciding if she was right for me (she is ...she is a great dog!).

I am already going to read some books on this before I commit and really want to be 100% prepared for costs, vet care, food, bathroom breaks, sleeping quarters, and any special needs that may be encountered. I was hoping someone here could give me some advice based on experience but my GSD doesn't seem to have any prey drive so I don't think she will attack or hurt the pig. I guess we'll see...
 

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Just keep in mind pot bellied pigs can get pretty mean. All the ones I've met end up claiming their own special spot and will attack anything that goes in that area. Dogs or people.
 

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We had one for a while. She (the pig) liked one of my dogs and hated the other one, for no discernible reason.

Both of my dogs at the time were kind of ambivalent toward her.... one would occasionally play bow and wag, the other dog basically ignored the pig. I am really not a pig person, I ended up with one because someone was keeping her in an apartment (illegally) and abruptly had to rehome her when management found out. She lived outdoors, and was very territorial about her space and her favorite spots. She didn’t like sharing and would deliberately plug the door of the insulated shed with her butt, no one else could get in.

I rehomed her when I found someone more suitable, I found that I am definitely more compatible with canines. :)
 

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It's very likely your dog will be fine with the pig, and very unlikely she could hurt it even if she tried. They're tough little guys! My dog has met 2 of them and she was fine with them, treated them like any other dog. I'd be more concerned about the pig hurting the dog, but from the ones I've seen they seem to do well with dogs. Good luck, and by all means show us pictures if you do get the pig!
 

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The pig looks cute in that picture. Is it a baby? Things could change. I knew someone who had a very aggressive pig and a very aggressive Golden Retriever. I couldn’t get near either one of them, but I could smell the pig all the way across the yard and into her house. I don’t know her anymore because they moved to a ranch where they could have a lot more pigs and other animals and we did not stay in touch. So I don’t know the outcome. All I took away from her pig situation is that it was aggressive and smelly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We had one for a while. She (the pig) liked one of my dogs and hated the other one, for no discernible reason.


I rehomed her when I found someone more suitable, I found that I am definitely more compatible with canines. :)
Great! Someone with experience.

Well, I went and looked at her. She is a year old pig and we spent about 1/2 hour together with my dog. My dog was curious but not aggressive and the pig more or less ignored my dog. It wasn't a bad interaction but it necessarily good either. Or rather what I was expecting like when two friendly dogs greet each other. The pig took some food from me but wasn't exactly friendly but that is how she is with new people. From what I was told she acted very similar to a dog.

I want this potential pet pig to be happy so I don't plan on taking her unless I can keep her forever (apparently they have the same lifespans as GSDs) One thing I did wonder is how did you rehome a pig? Is the best place in the country? I have some friends who live in the country and have plenty of pets (dogs, cats, chickens) and was thinking about contacting them to see if they were interested if this pig doesn't fit with me. She seemed like a very sweet pig but I really have to do more reading and research to know what exactly I might be getting myself into.

I'll keep you updated.
 

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I would assume that for you and anywhere you might consider rehoming the pig would need to know whether they are allowed where they live. Livestock are not allowed in all towns, houses etc.... might depend on deed restrictions or town zoning.

My only experience with dogs and pigs was a previous dog of mine who particularly liked to hunt and kill them. Those were wild pigs though.
 

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And, how big is this pig going to get? And will it still be a realistic pet if it reaches maximum possible size?

When we were kids we liked exotic pets and my parents were...irresponsible. they bought my sister a burmese python. What did any of us think we were going to do with that thing when it was 20 ft long? Well, me and my sister were under ten so I take no responsibility on that one.
 

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It's very likely your dog will be fine with the pig, and very unlikely she could hurt it even if she tried. They're tough little guys! My dog has met 2 of them and she was fine with them, treated them like any other dog. I'd be more concerned about the pig hurting the dog, but from the ones I've seen they seem to do well with dogs. Good luck, and by all means show us pictures if you do get the pig!
Trust me, a GSD can kill a pig in short order. Nothing is tougher than a feral hog and I've seen a GSD dispatch one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I did ask how she knew for sure the pig wouldn't grow to be huge like 200lbs or more. She told me the vet (who is experienced with pigs) told her that it is very unlikely based on her physiology she would grow much bigger (she is currently 60lbs) plus her teeth were mature.

I asked for all the vet records and I should have a look at them later this week.

There are a lot of questions I have just to be on the safe side and have written many down that I plan on researching into. As I mentioned, I did look into getting a pet pig years ago but was didn't follow-through because I wondered if pigs get along with other animals and how you exactly take care of one (outside of being on a farm).

I plan on looking more seriously into this but today was just a meet & greet which wasn't bad.
 

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Great! Someone with experience.

Well, I went and looked at her. She is a year old pig and we spent about 1/2 hour together with my dog. My dog was curious but not aggressive and the pig more or less ignored my dog. It wasn't a bad interaction but it necessarily good either. Or rather what I was expecting like when two friendly dogs greet each other. The pig took some food from me but wasn't exactly friendly but that is how she is with new people. From what I was told she acted very similar to a dog.

I want this potential pet pig to be happy so I don't plan on taking her unless I can keep her forever (apparently they have the same lifespans as GSDs) One thing I did wonder is how did you rehome a pig? Is the best place in the country? I have some friends who live in the country and have plenty of pets (dogs, cats, chickens) and was thinking about contacting them to see if they were interested if this pig doesn't fit with me. She seemed like a very sweet pig but I really have to do more reading and research to know what exactly I might be getting myself into.

I'll keep you updated.
It wasn’t easy to rehome her, she was very very large and way past the “cute” appeal phase. I ended up with her because we keep a small number of friendly outdoor animals (goats, etc) for our client’s kids’ enjoyment - family business. The person who needed to dump her ASAP ended up basically crying and begging us to take her, and we caved.

I’ve gotten more blunt, and better at saying “no”, over the years. Usually the best rehome options are people with hobby/small petting farms. And those people are often inundated with free animals from similar circumstances. The problem with rehoming pigs is that plenty of people want to acquire them and put them straight into the freezer.....

A few years ago, 20+ pot belly pigs were removed from a hoarding situation. The local farm rescue that took them in had a heck of a time with placements, because so many municipalities don’t allow pigs. I’d check zoning, and vet references also. It’s pretty easy here to find free/unwanted pet pigs, but I can only speak to my local area. If you do decide to add the pig I hope it works well for you for the long term, it’s just not my cup of tea :)
 

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The boars need to be neutered pretty early from what I know. Piglets are hilariously funny but mature pigs, I would be a little worried to try to make friends with the dog.
A fun read is "the Good Pig" from ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It wasn’t easy to rehome her, she was very very large and way past the “cute” appeal phase.
Could you elaborate on what you mean by past the "cute" phase? I'm sure she would always be cute to me but am very afraid that I might not be able to handle a 200lb or more pot-bellied pig.

What were the circumstances involved in trying to rehome a large pig? That is what I am afraid of that I might not be able to handle her at some point and will have to give her up. I want to make sure she doesn't end up on some kindhearted stranger's dinner table.

:frown2:
 

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Could you elaborate on what you mean by past the "cute" phase? I'm sure she would always be cute to me but am very afraid that I might not be able to handle a 200lb or more pot-bellied pig.

What were the circumstances involved in trying to rehome a large pig? That is what I am afraid of that I might not be able to handle her at some point and will have to give her up. I want to make sure she doesn't end up on some kindhearted stranger's dinner table.

:frown2:
It’s easy enough to rehome a spaniel-sized animal that fits in a dog crate or the backseat of a car... but when you are rehoming a 200+lb animal you need to find someone with a livestock trailer and the accommodations to take on an animal of that size, strength, and appetite. It really is an entirely different ballgame.

It took me over a year of networking to find her a suitable home, and I ended up trailering her there on my own time and expense.

Even the “simple” task of getting a pet pig to a vet is a situation, if you don’t have a trailer/vehicle or a vet that does house calls. And you need a vet that sees “exotics”. My large animal vet freely told me that their knowledge of pigs is for production (pork) not pets, so they had minimal insight on nutrition for pet longevity, etc.

Unfortunately I’m far from a great source of info - I ended up with her rather unwillingly, and after several years I spent a lot of time finding somewhere more suitable. Along the way I met and heard about many, many pet pigs that were purchased happily but later regretted. Just my experience - people who love them, love them very much. :)
 

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I’m looking to get a feeder pig. Not as a pig but, for meat for us and our GSD who in a RAW diet. We have chickens and goats that he has no access to but, the pig pen will be a lot closer and pretty much within his wireless fence range.
Has any had any experience raising pigs when your GSD can get to the pen. Did he bark at them nonstop, try to bite them or did the pigs try to attack your GSD?
 
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