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No collars in the crate and I forgot about the chinook collar. I had an original but it kept falling off without any real tension. Do they stay on better? If his collar comes off he chews it up and I would have that to worry about.
Mine have been trouble-free, and I've used them for a number of years. They don't come off by themselves, and if I grab both rings, I can still hold a dog that wants to dash off (useful when corralling fosters who aren't yet responsive to voice commands!)

I also found the company's service to be fabulous. When my crew were young and full of mischief, they would sometimes pull them off each other deliberately to use them as tug toys (and then occasionally chew on them). I called the company to reorder and explained what happened, and they sympathized and sold me replacements at a very steep discount -- even though it wasn't their fault. I thought the company was fabulous about it. (And the dogs grew out of that nonsense!)
 

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One of my huskies almost bought the farm while in the kennel. There was a possum on the top rail and the huskies were jumping and attempting to supplement breakfast. I wasn't too worried , they couldn't reach the possum and the kids put them out and their collars were never worn in the kennel. The howling changed a bit, I looked out and Gunnar is hanging by his choke chain. Omg it's so difficult to hold a terrified 65 lb dog up while you try to unhook the chain. He was a little blue on his gums nd lips and had pooed and peed himself. Stuck next to me for a day or two. Btw, never found out which kid did not remove his collar.
 

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has anyone had problems with prong collars?
Not yet.....however I could see the potential for a prong collar to become uncoupled ...perhaps at a very inopportune time....

I know I have seen several videos and other examples which take that into consideration and utilize another collar with a safety link to the prong in case this were to happen....there's a name for it...probably basic for most users....but I have never used this fail-safe method.

Since a prong collar requires a tiny bit more attention to detail when putting it on a dog properly...one needs to appreciate the possibility for improperly connecting it. If you proceed acknowledging this fact, you should be okay.

I use a very lightweight prong on my pooch at times and besides making sure both prongs are properly seated upon connection....I also have to make certain the prongs themselves are not bent too close together, which would compromise the security of the collar.

SuperG
 

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has anyone had problems with prong collars?
Midnite had his prong on and I let him out right before we left for training, he came in without it. I now use a choke collar that is a couple inches bigger then his neck as a safety precaution.
 

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no but they are not meant to be worn when not training
This is important. Prongs are never left on dogs unsupervised. Only on walks, or in training etc.

This is a famous picture against prong collars doing its rounds all over: (well here is my explanation for that picture.)

prong.jpg

Now people everywhere think that a prong can impale. A properly fitted good quality prong will NEVER impale. What is happening in the above picture I believe is a PRESSURE SORE. You can get them lying in bed and not moving. The below picture is just the development of a pressure sore, just from being unable to move in a soft bed. Comatose patient, etc.

So it goes without saying. It is NOT ok, to leave a prong, that is supposed to be tightly fit, on a dog for large periods of time. As pressure sores can develop, with constant pressure pressing on the dog in specific spots.

pressure sore.jpg
 

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"Findings from the three models indicate that pressure ulcers in subdermal tissues under bony prominences very likely occur between the first hour and 4 to 6 hours after sustained loading."
 

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That picture almost looks like a puppy grew into prong collar. It kind of looks like imbedded collar wounds to me.
 

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That picture almost looks like a puppy grew into prong collar. It kind of looks like imbedded collar wounds to me.
Yep that could of happened too. Essentially its the same thing. If the puppy grew over time and the prong got tighter over time, you can still have pressure sores develop. You could tighten a prong to the same extent on a healthy dog, and i dont believe it will impale the skin. This happens over time. Try it on yourself. Put the prong around the neck tightly so it goes into your skin. It wont just 'impale' You can do that with a knife too. The knife wont just impale unless its really sharp like a doctors needle. You have to go really, really deep, and get through the skin 'slack'.
The fact is however is that it was pressure developed over time. Weather the puppy was growing, or the collar too tight for a long period. It is a pressure sore, which has developed over time. Either way there was mismanagement.

Here is the thing. A prong is a correction tool. It needs handler feedback to do its job. Also although bearable, not most comfortable thing to have on for hours on end for absolutely no reason. Basically you should not be using a prong collar as the dogs natural identification collar. I just don't see the logic behind it. The picture is a terrible case. Most people can get away with just leaving a prong collar on with no real effects. But still. Constant pressure in small areas for extended periods is just not good for the dog. Your living collar should be for comfort.

Inbedded collar wounds/pressure sores. I think are just different ways of explaining the same thing. The mechanism however, is not from a correction unless he fit it really really tight and sharpened the edges. I dont see that happening from a correction even if he just places it too tight.
 

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We take our GSDs collar off every night. If we cannot slip two fingers between her and her collar its to tight. We have to walk her with a harness lead since she is good about getting her leash off by walking backwards when she is upset.
 

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Wow, I'm going to have to read this thread in full because the collar thing has never been an issue for us so this is eye opening. I need to see what others are doing incase they get out. We are always picking up strays and I love when they have their tags on and I can call the owner right away.
I agree with you concern. People will say your dog should never run out, but they might one day. Not everyone has a chip detector. And where one person may make an effort to take the dog for identification another person might not, but may view your phone number on chain and call you.

I have always had my dogs wear flat collars in the past or those semi choke chains which I think are very comfortable. They are not full choke chains. Forgot what they are called.

I like those chokers because they are loose around their neck. Is made of flat metal, but not heavy metal. Quite light. And hangs relatively loose. They don't slip it off however.
 

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I agree with you concern. People will say your dog should never run out, but they might one day. Not everyone has a chip detector. And where one person may make an effort to take the dog for identification another person might not, but may view your phone number on chain and call you.

I have always had my dogs wear flat collars in the past or those semi choke chains which I think are very comfortable. They are not full choke chains. Forgot what they are called.

I like those chokers because they are loose around their neck. Is made of flat metal, but not heavy metal. Quite light. And hangs relatively loose. They don't slip it off however.
I too have never had an issue with collars. My 10 yr old GSD wears a choke chain and when I take it off to brush him, he gets irritated unless it goes back on him. He'll go so far as to find it, pick it up and bring it to me to put on him if I don't do it beforehand.
His chain has his ID, his license and his rabies vacc for inspection should a bored bylaw officer want to see it when we're out for a walk, and I know I'd forget his neck chain if it wasn't already on him.

There are some real horror stories for sure on this thread, especially with multi dog homes. Its an eye opener and I'm more aware now because of it, but for now anyways, I'll be leaving my chain/collar on my dog.
 

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I too have never had an issue with collars. My 10 yr old GSD wears a choke chain and when I take it off to brush him, he gets irritated unless it goes back on him. He'll go so far as to find it, pick it up and bring it to me to put on him if I don't do it beforehand.
His chain has his ID, his license and his rabies vacc for inspection should a bored bylaw officer want to see it when we're out for a walk, and I know I'd forget his neck chain if it wasn't already on him.

There are some real horror stories for sure on this thread, especially with multi dog homes. Its an eye opener and I'm more aware now because of it, but for now anyways, I'll be leaving my chain/collar on my dog.
My patrol dog was like that too. Take his choke collar off and if you held it open he'd put his head through it.
 

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Wow, I'm going to have to read this thread in full because the collar thing has never been an issue for us so this is eye opening. I need to see what others are doing incase they get out. We are always picking up strays and I love when they have their tags on and I can call the owner right away.

As I've said before, it's not an either/or choice (either the dog goes collarless or it's at risk of strangulation). The Keepsafe Break-away collars solve the dilemma. They will come off with a hard enough tug if there's a collar accident while the dog is alone -- they're designed to prevent strangulation. If the dog somehow escapes, though, it's wearing a collar with tags--so your neighbors can get it home quickly.

Even though I have personally lost a dog many years ago to a collar accident when we weren't home, I still would never advocate people leave dogs collarless. I deal with way, way too many strays who are wonderful dogs whom I know were once loved family dogs who somehow land in shelters and never find their way back home. Tags are incredibly important. A dog without a collar that gets picked up stray in my city gets a needle and dies in 3 days (including weekend days) if the owner doesn't show up and reclaim in that time. With a collar, it's 5 days. With a tag....I've seen the shelter keep a dog safe when an owner was out of town for over a week, because they reached him and knew he was coming. Nobody expects their dog to escape....stuff happens, though.
 

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The break away collars for me. When I was around 17, neighbors GSD jumped their backyard fence with a choke chain on. I happened to see the dog do it. The chain got caught in the fence and broke the dogs neck. Still one of the most tragic things I've witnessed. After Id never leave a collar capable of choking a dog! It was horrible waiting for them to get home and tell them the dog is dead.
 

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My brother's 2 dogs were wrestling in the back yard and the golden got her canines caught in the blue healers collar. My brothers girlfriend came over frantically pounding on my door. We ran back but couldn't get them pulled loose. It was one of the most horrible experiences in my life watching that poor dog choke to death. I still have nightmares about it.
 
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