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Discussion Starter #3
Not that long ago some people I know adopted an Aussie puppy. The story was something like that a breeder had produced a litter but was unable to sell all the puppies so they were dumped. I can't remember the exact wording. But it definitely made me suspicious. I bet you anything they were "dumped" at an auction, where the "rescue" bought and then resold them.

The rescue coming right out and saying these were breeder pups who could not be sold made me think...so you are selling them for the puppy mill?
 

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Breeders in Louisiana DEFINITELY dump unsold inventory. I've been at the shelter when it happens. I've got pictures of the pups in a garbage bin unloaded from the truck. They want quick cash out of the litter, not work or the cost of caring for the pups. They also dump the dam if she has any complications or vetting needs, because it's cheaper for them to start over with a new dog than pay for vet care. The lucky ones get dumped at shelters. The unlucky ones get dumped on the side of the road, or in the woods. We have one now that was found by himself, covered in fleas, skinny and dehydrated, at 6 weeks.



If anyone knows of good German Shepherd Rescues that have more foster homes and adopters than they can find dogs for, and happens to be farting money out of their backsides to acquire dogs, please put them in touch with me. We're still euthanizing GSDs in droves in Louisiana shelters. Those wealthy rescues could put their money into boarding at a vet, paying for heartworm treatment, and transport dogs that really will die without out-of-state rescues....because we're still totally overwhelmed by the need.



We turned down an emaciated young Dutch Shepherd at a rural, high-kill shelter yesterday because there's no space. People say, "Dutchie? Nah. Couldn't be!" Yep, several a year go through our shelters, and Mals are very common. A gentle, sad plush-coated GSD seized in an abuse case was told "no" over the weekend. An elderly one dumped at a vet clinic also has no chance of a fospice spot because it's already occupied by another dog, so she's stuck in a concrete kennel until the vet gives up searching for an adopter and kills her. A friendly, happy young one with nothing wrong with him was left behind at a shelter for lack of space. He will likely be adopted out by the shelter to live outside, on a chain because that's the kind of home most of our shelters adopt out to -- and he'll die of HW in a few years, because those kind of homes don't use prevention here.



The one shelter that transports to a good breed rescue up north has saturated that rescue with young, HW- dogs so that rescue is now full -- any GSD that had a good temp and was HW- was going on transport as long as that was an option, but our shelters use up even those breed-specific resources quickly. I always think when I see these threads I should post the RIP pictures for the ones that died this week down here, but I don't have the stomach to linger on it.



So, yeah. While the Internet Commentariat engages hates on rescues based on bad behavior of a few uneducated people, we'll keep on keeping on down here for the few we can help. *shrug*
 

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Read the comments, too. Some people are buying those dogs for the show ring? That means they are sold and kept intact. There is so much going on beneath the surface. I’m glad people are finally getting that information out to the public. Of course, someone always wants stronger regulation on breeders, which means there will be fewer well bred dogs and more puppy mills, as only the good breeders would follow the law. Puppy mills are already breaking laws.
 

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Here's the other side of the story:

Rescue Dogs in Maine - Homeward Bound | Down East Magazine

There is high demand for non-breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs from down south because northern shelters are flooded with breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs. The last folks I know who adopted one of these breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs from a shelter--against my advice, and which was pawned off as a Labradoodle, unknown background, iffy temperament, but they wanted to "save" a dog--tried to maul their teenage daughter to death when they went out to dinner one night and left her alone with the dog a month after they adopted the dog. She is alive, although permanently scarred, only because she managed to get loose briefly and lock herself in the bathroom and call her parents on her cellphone.

I tell my dog training clients to adopt a southern transport dog that has been carefully evaluated if they want to adopt. Thirty years ago, awesome dogs were a dime a dozen in northern shelters. Not anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Breeders in Louisiana DEFINITELY dump unsold inventory. I've been at the shelter when it happens. I've got pictures of the pups in a garbage bin unloaded from the truck. They want quick cash out of the litter, not work or the cost of caring for the pups. They also dump the dam if she has any complications or vetting needs, because it's cheaper for them to start over with a new dog than pay for vet care. The lucky ones get dumped at shelters. The unlucky ones get dumped on the side of the road, or in the woods. We have one now that was found by himself, covered in fleas, skinny and dehydrated, at 6 weeks.



If anyone knows of good German Shepherd Rescues that have more foster homes and adopters than they can find dogs for, and happens to be farting money out of their backsides to acquire dogs, please put them in touch with me. We're still euthanizing GSDs in droves in Louisiana shelters. Those wealthy rescues could put their money into boarding at a vet, paying for heartworm treatment, and transport dogs that really will die without out-of-state rescues....because we're still totally overwhelmed by the need.



We turned down an emaciated young Dutch Shepherd at a rural, high-kill shelter yesterday because there's no space. People say, "Dutchie? Nah. Couldn't be!" Yep, several a year go through our shelters, and Mals are very common. A gentle, sad plush-coated GSD seized in an abuse case was told "no" over the weekend. An elderly one dumped at a vet clinic also has no chance of a fospice spot because it's already occupied by another dog, so she's stuck in a concrete kennel until the vet gives up searching for an adopter and kills her. A friendly, happy young one with nothing wrong with him was left behind at a shelter for lack of space. He will likely be adopted out by the shelter to live outside, on a chain because that's the kind of home most of our shelters adopt out to -- and he'll die of HW in a few years, because those kind of homes don't use prevention here.



The one shelter that transports to a good breed rescue up north has saturated that rescue with young, HW- dogs so that rescue is now full -- any GSD that had a good temp and was HW- was going on transport as long as that was an option, but our shelters use up even those breed-specific resources quickly. I always think when I see these threads I should post the RIP pictures for the ones that died this week down here, but I don't have the stomach to linger on it.



So, yeah. While the Internet Commentariat engages hates on rescues based on bad behavior of a few uneducated people, we'll keep on keeping on down here for the few we can help. *shrug*

@Magwart, for the record, I think you and people like you are absolutely heroes. Right now it feels a little bit to me like the service dog thing... where unscrupulous people are jumping on a bandwagon and taking advantage of a situation because they can and they are doing it at the expense of genuine people (genuine rescues, people who genuinely need service dogs)

I'm sorry if this offended you, it wasn't intended to be any kind of a statement against people doing the real work
 

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Here's the other side of the story:

Rescue Dogs in Maine - Homeward Bound | Down East Magazine

There is high demand for non-breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs from down south because northern shelters are flooded with breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs. The last folks I know who adopted one of these breed-that-can't-be-named-here dogs from a shelter--against my advice, and which was pawned off as a Labradoodle, unknown background, iffy temperament, but they wanted to "save" a dog--tried to maul their teenage daughter to death when they went out to dinner one night and left her alone with the dog a month after they adopted the dog. She is alive, although permanently scarred, only because she managed to get loose briefly and lock herself in the bathroom and call her parents on her cellphone.

I tell my dog training clients to adopt a southern transport dog that has been carefully evaluated if they want to adopt. Thirty years ago, awesome dogs were a dime a dozen in northern shelters. Not anymore.
And the local breed that can't be mentioned rescues fight viciously against any transport of adoptable dogs to areas experiencing a shortage. It was a decade long problem in the NE where I live. They have in recent years finally started bringing dogs here and they are all spoken for before they get here.
 

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Breeders in Louisiana DEFINITELY dump unsold inventory. I've been at the shelter when it happens. I've got pictures of the pups in a garbage bin unloaded from the truck. They want quick cash out of the litter, not work or the cost of caring for the pups. They also dump the dam if she has any complications or vetting needs, because it's cheaper for them to start over with a new dog than pay for vet care. The lucky ones get dumped at shelters. The unlucky ones get dumped on the side of the road, or in the woods. We have one now that was found by himself, covered in fleas, skinny and dehydrated, at 6 weeks.



If anyone knows of good German Shepherd Rescues that have more foster homes and adopters than they can find dogs for, and happens to be farting money out of their backsides to acquire dogs, please put them in touch with me. We're still euthanizing GSDs in droves in Louisiana shelters. Those wealthy rescues could put their money into boarding at a vet, paying for heartworm treatment, and transport dogs that really will die without out-of-state rescues....because we're still totally overwhelmed by the need.



We turned down an emaciated young Dutch Shepherd at a rural, high-kill shelter yesterday because there's no space. People say, "Dutchie? Nah. Couldn't be!" Yep, several a year go through our shelters, and Mals are very common. A gentle, sad plush-coated GSD seized in an abuse case was told "no" over the weekend. An elderly one dumped at a vet clinic also has no chance of a fospice spot because it's already occupied by another dog, so she's stuck in a concrete kennel until the vet gives up searching for an adopter and kills her. A friendly, happy young one with nothing wrong with him was left behind at a shelter for lack of space. He will likely be adopted out by the shelter to live outside, on a chain because that's the kind of home most of our shelters adopt out to -- and he'll die of HW in a few years, because those kind of homes don't use prevention here.



The one shelter that transports to a good breed rescue up north has saturated that rescue with young, HW- dogs so that rescue is now full -- any GSD that had a good temp and was HW- was going on transport as long as that was an option, but our shelters use up even those breed-specific resources quickly. I always think when I see these threads I should post the RIP pictures for the ones that died this week down here, but I don't have the stomach to linger on it.



So, yeah. While the Internet Commentariat engages hates on rescues based on bad behavior of a few uneducated people, we'll keep on keeping on down here for the few we can help. *shrug*
I don't think any of these type of threads are directed at true, working in the trenches, living with the heart ache and struggling for resources type rescues. This is about people exploiting the name of "rescue" for $$.

HW question, once a dog is hw cleared, do they have to continue treatment after moving to an area without hw?
 

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HW question, once a dog is hw cleared, do they have to continue treatment after moving to an area without hw?

Complicated question. After HW treatment is completed, you actually won't get a negative test result right away because antigen is still present. It takes many months to go down. Most rescues consider a treated dog as cured -- then it just needs to stay on HW prevention forever. HOWEVER...we've known a few dogs that took two rounds of treatment months apart because the worm load was so high. It's super rare, but it happens. At minimum, I would make sure that the three-shot protocol is used for HW treatment, not the two-shot protocol, as there's much higher odds of treatment failing with the two-shot protocol (though it costs 1/3 less...). I would also keep any treated dogs on Advantage Multi (not Heartguard) for a year after treatment because it's the only one with documented adulticide effects -- that way if one slips through it will likely be dead anyway before you re-test.



For transport, the big question isn't an antigen-clear test (that could take almost a year...3-4 mo. in treatment, plus another 6 waiting for a negative result), but rather is the dog microfilaria clear. If there are no microfilaria, it's not contagious. So they usually treat with doxy for a month and do two doses of Ad Multi before transport, check the blood for microfilaria, and get transport clearance once the vet confirms it's clear of them. There's no space to warehouse dogs here for 3 months (much less a year) during HW treatment before transport, so all the shelters I know are just clearing microfilaria and transporting so HW treatment can happen up north. Nobody who knows what they're doing will transport dogs with circulating microfilaria, but well-meaning idiots occasionally do it until someone educates them on why it's a bad thing to do.
 

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I know more great rescues then not so good ones. So none of these articles will put a dent on what rescues are to me. People are angels that are helping so many dogs for no other reason just to help the dogs needing homes. Just like there are a lot crap breeders and just as many good breeders. There was a story about a box of purebred puppies found in the middle of the woods in a very desolate area. Purebred puppies to me makes not difference if they were mix bred pups. Someone saved them fed them and brought to a rescue place.Texas throws cats in bags with the trash -live cats there were once pets. There was time that animal shelters destroyed hundreds of dogs weekly but with all these animal rescues this has changed. There was that recent horrific woman who was hanging her dog from her apartment window By the harness and slammed it repeatedly over a concrete wall . She was caught and brought to jail. Her dog dropped of at a rescue to be rehomed.
 

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My Jackson was a purebred 7 week old puppy that was dumped at the shelter I worked at, along with his litter-mate and both parents. The breeder's landlord had given her a date to have all the dogs gone by and Jackson and his litter-mate hadn't sold (it was a huge litter...I still have the newspaper ad she ran... she started selling them at 5 weeks). Two purebred adults and two puppies. Dumped at a shelter.



I also remember a gentleman that bred Cavaliers. He moved from Washington state in with his sister and brother-in-law in Boise, along with six adult dogs and three litters of puppies. He dumped 17 dogs and puppies at the shelter when there was an argument about the mess the puppies made.



It happens a lot more frequently than people would think.

Sheilah
 

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Complicated question. After HW treatment is completed, you actually won't get a negative test result right away because antigen is still present. It takes many months to go down. Most rescues consider a treated dog as cured -- then it just needs to stay on HW prevention forever. HOWEVER...we've known a few dogs that took two rounds of treatment months apart because the worm load was so high. It's super rare, but it happens. At minimum, I would make sure that the three-shot protocol is used for HW treatment, not the two-shot protocol, as there's much higher odds of treatment failing with the two-shot protocol (though it costs 1/3 less...). I would also keep any treated dogs on Advantage Multi (not Heartguard) for a year after treatment because it's the only one with documented adulticide effects -- that way if one slips through it will likely be dead anyway before you re-test.



For transport, the big question isn't an antigen-clear test (that could take almost a year...3-4 mo. in treatment, plus another 6 waiting for a negative result), but rather is the dog microfilaria clear. If there are no microfilaria, it's not contagious. So they usually treat with doxy for a month and do two doses of Ad Multi before transport, check the blood for microfilaria, and get transport clearance once the vet confirms it's clear of them. There's no space to warehouse dogs here for 3 months (much less a year) during HW treatment before transport, so all the shelters I know are just clearing microfilaria and transporting so HW treatment can happen up north. Nobody who knows what they're doing will transport dogs with circulating microfilaria, but well-meaning idiots occasionally do it until someone educates them on why it's a bad thing to do.
Thanks!

Bolded, are these two seperate treatments? I've not had to treat a dog with hw before and know next to nothing about it.
 

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Thanks!

Bolded, are these two seperate treatments? I've not had to treat a dog with hw before and know next to nothing about it.

No, the Advantage Multi is also the prevention -- it kills microfilaria, prevents new infection, and slowly kills adult worms that slip through treatment. After the dog is eventually confirmed clear after treatment, I think it's fine to switch to whatever prevention product is most convenient (like generic Heartguard, up North).
 

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Breeders in Louisiana DEFINITELY dump unsold inventory. I've been at the shelter when it happens. I've got pictures of the pups in a garbage bin unloaded from the truck. They want quick cash out of the litter, not work or the cost of caring for the pups. They also dump the dam if she has any complications or vetting needs, because it's cheaper for them to start over with a new dog than pay for vet care. The lucky ones get dumped at shelters. The unlucky ones get dumped on the side of the road, or in the woods. We have one now that was found by himself, covered in fleas, skinny and dehydrated, at 6 weeks.



If anyone knows of good German Shepherd Rescues that have more foster homes and adopters than they can find dogs for, and happens to be farting money out of their backsides to acquire dogs, please put them in touch with me. We're still euthanizing GSDs in droves in Louisiana shelters. Those wealthy rescues could put their money into boarding at a vet, paying for heartworm treatment, and transport dogs that really will die without out-of-state rescues....because we're still totally overwhelmed by the need.



We turned down an emaciated young Dutch Shepherd at a rural, high-kill shelter yesterday because there's no space. People say, "Dutchie? Nah. Couldn't be!" Yep, several a year go through our shelters, and Mals are very common. A gentle, sad plush-coated GSD seized in an abuse case was told "no" over the weekend. An elderly one dumped at a vet clinic also has no chance of a fospice spot because it's already occupied by another dog, so she's stuck in a concrete kennel until the vet gives up searching for an adopter and kills her. A friendly, happy young one with nothing wrong with him was left behind at a shelter for lack of space. He will likely be adopted out by the shelter to live outside, on a chain because that's the kind of home most of our shelters adopt out to -- and he'll die of HW in a few years, because those kind of homes don't use prevention here.



The one shelter that transports to a good breed rescue up north has saturated that rescue with young, HW- dogs so that rescue is now full -- any GSD that had a good temp and was HW- was going on transport as long as that was an option, but our shelters use up even those breed-specific resources quickly. I always think when I see these threads I should post the RIP pictures for the ones that died this week down here, but I don't have the stomach to linger on it.



So, yeah. While the Internet Commentariat engages hates on rescues based on bad behavior of a few uneducated people, we'll keep on keeping on down here for the few we can help. *shrug*
I hear what you are saying but the shortage here is so severe that there isn't even a GSD rescue that services the area I live in. There are only two known rescues here. One for Great Pyrenees and they usually have no more than 4 or 5 dogs at any given time and the other is a HUGE one for the breed that can't be mentioned. So, no, you won't find an organized rescue for GSDs complete with fosters but you will find a surplus of good homes looking to adopt.
 

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I hear what you are saying but the shortage here is so severe that there isn't even a GSD rescue that services the area I live in. There are only two known rescues here. One for Great Pyrenees and they usually have no more than 4 or 5 dogs at any given time and the other is a HUGE one for the breed that can't be mentioned. So, no, you won't find an organized rescue for GSDs complete with fosters but you will find a surplus of good homes looking to adopt.

Well, when I moved to Louisiana, started fostering for the shelter, found the shelter without vetting resources, and learned no breed rescue was in my city, I gathered GSD-owning friends at training one weekend and said, "Let's do this!" We found a breed rescue in another city to teach us what we didn't know, and we formed a nonprofit to fill the gap.


Sometimes waiting for someone else to make the world better just means it doesn't get done.



If there's no GSR in your city, lots of good adopters, and people willing to kick in financial resources to transport and vet dogs, then the solution is kind of obvious, right? Form one. Your local adopters won't need to adopt from shady auction-supporting groups if you can give them an ethical rescue alternative -- it's not all that different from the BYB/ethcal breeder choice.



Depending on the resourcefulness of people involved, and your state's insurance rates and regs, I'd estimate it takes around $2k to start a rescue legally, and do everything right. Then budget whatever you need to on transport and vetting dogs, and sign up would-be adopters as your first foster homes by giving them "dibbs" on adopting the dog they foster. Blink fast and you'll have entire litters with the dam being sent wherever you are by April and adolescent dogs all day long.
 

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Rescues that import really need to be more honest. I just checked my local shelter that imports. All but two were obviously bully breeds. All were called various mixes- retriever mix, one that had somewhat the right coloring malinois mix (yeah, right). Many had those phrases that mean the dog is aggressive to other dogs, not good with kids, etc.

Please, if you are going to import a dog all that way, at a minimum, import a dog that is good with other dogs and kids. As Magwart says, there seem to be plenty of great dogs killed each day for lack of space. Bring the very best north. It only makes sense!
 

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The disparity between South & North is extreme.

The year they served bluefin tuna (a critically endangered species.... critical....) and had a fashion show at our humane society's annual fundraising event was 1. The year we stopped being a sponsor and attending and 2. The year I started sending my memorial donation to rescues in the southern part of the country instead of those local to me. There is no one-size-fits-all decision about what's ethical and what isn't, but I'd rather have my money vet/medicate/feed instead of buying sushi and champagne.
 

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Complicated question. After HW treatment is completed, you actually won't get a negative test result right away because antigen is still present. It takes many months to go down. Most rescues consider a treated dog as cured -- then it just needs to stay on HW prevention forever. HOWEVER...we've known a few dogs that took two rounds of treatment months apart because the worm load was so high. It's super rare, but it happens. At minimum, I would make sure that the three-shot protocol is used for HW treatment, not the two-shot protocol, as there's much higher odds of treatment failing with the two-shot protocol (though it costs 1/3 less...). I would also keep any treated dogs on Advantage Multi (not Heartguard) for a year after treatment because it's the only one with documented adulticide effects -- that way if one slips through it will likely be dead anyway before you re-test.



For transport, the big question isn't an antigen-clear test (that could take almost a year...3-4 mo. in treatment, plus another 6 waiting for a negative result), but rather is the dog microfilaria clear. If there are no microfilaria, it's not contagious. So they usually treat with doxy for a month and do two doses of Ad Multi before transport, check the blood for microfilaria, and get transport clearance once the vet confirms it's clear of them. There's no space to warehouse dogs here for 3 months (much less a year) during HW treatment before transport, so all the shelters I know are just clearing microfilaria and transporting so HW treatment can happen up north. Nobody who knows what they're doing will transport dogs with circulating microfilaria, but well-meaning idiots occasionally do it until someone educates them on why it's a bad thing to do.

@GatorBytes, I love you!
Lilykins was imported to Canada HW+. Let me be very, very clear on this, I adore Lil! I am so happy that they found each other and that sweet little Lil was saved. However, the rescue screwed up bigtime. They imported a dog that could have infected others and dumped huge expense, worry and heartache on an unsuspecting owner. Disclosure was muddy, and to my mind intentionally so, they have failed at every turn to do right by owner or dog and in a couple of instances pushed for a treatment path that could have harmed or even killed the dog. Not to mention that the paperwork to get these dogs across the border HAD to have been bogus since you cannot transport a sick animal across a border. And I simply don't buy that Lil was the only one of the bunch. Basically they hauled a truckload of potentially sick animals across a border within 48hrs of picking them up from a shelter that could not possibly have vetted or quarantined them. That would not have even been time for a thorough exam of all of them.
I would never support a rescue that behaves in this manner.
 

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Well, when I moved to Louisiana, started fostering for the shelter, found the shelter without vetting resources, and learned no breed rescue was in my city, I gathered GSD-owning friends at training one weekend and said, "Let's do this!" We found a breed rescue in another city to teach us what we didn't know, and we formed a nonprofit to fill the gap.


Sometimes waiting for someone else to make the world better just means it doesn't get done.



If there's no GSR in your city, lots of good adopters, and people willing to kick in financial resources to transport and vet dogs, then the solution is kind of obvious, right? Form one. Your local adopters won't need to adopt from shady auction-supporting groups if you can give them an ethical rescue alternative -- it's not all that different from the BYB/ethcal breeder choice.



Depending on the resourcefulness of people involved, and your state's insurance rates and regs, I'd estimate it takes around $2k to start a rescue legally, and do everything right. Then budget whatever you need to on transport and vetting dogs, and sign up would-be adopters as your first foster homes by giving them "dibbs" on adopting the dog they foster. Blink fast and you'll have entire litters with the dam being sent wherever you are by April and adolescent dogs all day long.
You also need people who are fairly young and energetic with too much time on their hands, not to mention the space and the zoning to operate. ;) The latter is a very tricky aspect in the city.
 
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