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Discussion Starter #1
Hiya all

So far I've been feeding an omega 3&6 +9 blend
But I just read that dogs should only get omega3 fish oil, no omega 6 and definitely not omega9????

I was under the impression they needed omega 3,6&9 for balanced absorption and to keep the ratios correct?

So what's right?

Cheers


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Interesting. I am wondering if the other omegas are in the food. I do give my Sting Nordic Naturals Omega-3 Pet soft gels.
 

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I would also be interested in everyone's thoughts on this.
 

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Ok it is all over the web - so some googling would give even more information but quickly -- Omega has to do with the location of the first double bond from the terminal methyl group in a fatty acid.

Omega 6 - linoleic acid is one of the omega 6 fatty acids and it is an essential fatty acid. Too much relative to omega 3 is a problem, which can cause inflammation - particularly the fatty acid arachidonic acid.

Omega 3 - well, linolenic acid (alpha linolenic acid) ALA is another essential amino acid found in flax oil and some nut oils etc. ALA is not much use but the body converts it to DHA and EPA (both found in fish oil). The ability to convert ALA to EPA and DHA in the body is not as good as once thought and even less so in carnivores and the elderly. That is why fish oils are strongly suggested. Also DHA and EPA are abundant are in GRASS FED cattle. There are not plant sources of DHA and EPA (That I know of) other than some seaweeds.

The pathway in our bodies is that we take ALA, make EPA which makes DHA but they are very much readily absorbed from foods and more efficient and terribly beneficial. You can have too much of a good thing though. They "thin" the blood (that is reduce clotting)

High amounts, unnatutral amounts really of omega 6 to omega 3 are hallmarks of processed foods including dog foods - on a lot of the better ones you will see a ratio of 2.5 to 1 but don't be too smug. ALA is rapidly broken down and can go rancid. A typcial processed food ratio is 20 to 1 to 10 to 1. The fascination and use we have of cheap vegetable oils has been implicated in a lot of our inflammatory disease. [that and the fact that high temp cooking with them also forms trans fatty acids which are very bad]

Omega 9 are the monounstaturated fatty acids found in olive oil etc. oleic acid being the most notable. Also not essential as they can be synthesized by the body. Nuts, seeds, olive oil etc. I know they have been reputed to lower cholesterol levels, help with allergies, cancer etc. They are not essential as they are synthesized by the body...but it is for consideration.
 

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Mmmm
personally I would rather just supplement with salmon oil, or sardine oil, or sardines packed in water. They get more omega 6 than they need already!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry :(
The more I googled it the more confused I got :( I figured I'd ask here as some people seem very up to speed with the whole supplement feeding etc.

It was mostly the companies that sell Omega3,6 +9 Oils that claim you need to feed all of them together.

Thank you!
 

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Thanks Nancy, this is very informative. One question- why do people use coconut oil which has no omega-3. Why not just use fish oil?
 

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Coconut oil has, for the most part, a saturated short and medium chain fatty acids.
Easier for this to give a link
The Health Benefits Of Coconut Oil | Dogs Naturally Magazine

Coconut oil, being saturated also is VERY stable from rancidity and does not risk causing bleeing problems if too much. It really does do a nice number for the coat. It also is not going to provide the inflammatory issues associated with most vegetable oils. It is rapidly absorbed and a good source of energy when working.
 

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Thanks again. I will stick with coconut oil in the morning and salmon oil at night.
 

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Well, it stands to reason that since linoleic (18:2w6) acid is essential for all animals and is one of two precursors used for lipid metabolism that it would be present in all animal tissues. The issue is one of balance
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah they actually explain it with diagrams on their website :D Even I could follow those :D
Pity that stuff is astronomical in price to get shipped here. Most of the fish oil is mint or lemon flavoured. And salmon oil is next to impossible to get.

Maybe capsules are the way to go :D
They love the coconut oil tho, I managed to get some of that :)
 

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Capules good - make sure they are not rancid which is worse than NO added omega 3. Keep them in the fridge. Typically the bottles for capsules are filled with nitrogen but once they are open oxidation begins. Also plastics are somewhat permeable so over time oxygen will get into the unoopened plastic bottle anway. Also, sardines, anchovies - a good source -- most coldwater fish.

I remember somthing interesting as a biochem graduate student. The omega 3s are a natural "antifreeze" they tested reindeer tissues many years ago trying to figure out why they did not get frostbite on their exposed legs, and the omega 3 content is much higher in the extremeties than in the core tissues which are heavily insulated.

Like anything ,I think there is a base level of omega 3s above which they are really not beneficial. And the biggest problem with any polyunsaturated fat, which DHA and EPA (as well as ALA) are is rancidity - they are highly susceptible. And rancid fats are very bad fats.
 

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Thought you might be interested in this from Dr. Karen Shaw Becker, DVM:
Proposed New Minimum Requirements for Omega-3 Fatty Acids

"Another project AAFCO is working on is a revision to their dog and cat food nutrient profiles and feeding trial protocols to include new minimum requirements for ALA, EPA and DHA (omega-3 fatty acids). If these changes are approved in August as expected, they will appear in the 2014 AAFCO Official Publication.
While I appreciate AAFCO’s efforts to add omega-3s to its nutrient profiles, I don’t believe processed pet food is the best delivery system for essential fatty acids. Omega-3 fats are very vulnerable to damage from heat and can easily lose their bio-availability during the kibbling or canning process. They are also very sensitive to oxygen and can become damaged quickly.
Krill Oil is the supplement I recommend to insure your dog or cat is getting enough omega-3 fats in his diet."



Here is the whole article: Proposed New Minimum Requirements for Omega-3 Fatty Acids

:)
 
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