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Discussion Starter #1
Unfortunately our 14 week old pup had to be put to sleep to have a tooth removed.

I thought we were getting somewhere with a reduction in her attacking/biting us but it seems to have gone to pot all of a sudden.

Whenever we isolate her now after misbehaving, she simply doesn't care - she will now eat the cardboard box which blocks her (never done this before) or chews the skirting board which again shes never done before.

What should we do in this case? We obviously can't allow her to do it.
 

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At 14 weeks, she's right in the middle of teething, so her mouth fracking hurts! If she had to have a tooth extracted her mouth probably hurts even more than a normal teething puppy. Chewing on things (and destroying things) probably makes her feel better.

Have you tried soaking a rag in water, freezing it, and then giving it to her to chew on?

I'd also recommend keeping her in an exercise pen, not blocked off with a cardboard box in an area where she can eat the baseboards.

One thing I've learned with fosters is that if they can destroy something, they eventually will, so you can only leave them with things that are indestructible or that they're allowed to destroy.


Somebody come back and remind me of all of this in a few weeks when I have my pup.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
At 14 weeks, she's right in the middle of teething, so her mouth fracking hurts! If she had to have a tooth extracted her mouth probably hurts even more than a normal teething puppy. Chewing on things (and destroying things) probably makes her feel better.

Have you tried soaking a rag in water, freezing it, and then giving it to her to chew on?

I'd also recommend keeping her in an exercise pen, not blocked off with a cardboard box in an area where she can eat the baseboards.

One thing I've learned with fosters is that if they can destroy something, they eventually will, so you can only leave them with things that are indestructible or that they're allowed to destroy.


Somebody come back and remind me of all of this in a few weeks when I have my pup.
Thanks for that; we've considered a play pen - how often should she be in there or is it literally for isolation only?

Is this how its going to be for the next few months? I can't believe it's become an even worse problem - there's not even time to brush her; she just doesn't want to relax.
 

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You'll want to put her in a crate if you leave the house or for sleeping. The exercise pen is for when you're home but can't supervise her directly, like if you're cooking dinner or doing housework or whatever.

You do crate her when you're gone right?

Also, how much exercise is she getting? She should be getting worn out a couple of times a day. Are you in puppy classes?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She's crated when we leave the house or when she's sleeping; sometimes we have to tell her to sleep because it's like she forgets or doesn't want to miss out!

She's just started her classes but Ive taught her sit, down, stand, stay and paw since she was 8-9 weeks old.

As a minimum she gets two 15 minute walks a day but I don't feel that they are sufficient. We tend to take her out on a weekend for a good blast on an open field where she is as good as gold - that's when she's noticeably less active once home.

So with the addition of a playpen is there any other tricks other than keeping her stimulated when she's under our supervision? Or is everything okay
 

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You can also lay her meals in a track for her to get some mental exercise. The walks are not enough, and she needs much more that you are giving her at this age.
 

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So I shouldnt be taking the 15 minutes walk to prevent bad hips too seriously? Whats a more appropriate schedule?
I don't have a problem with the 15 minute walks, but she needs more unstructured play and training-type exercise with you. You can have her chase a rag or ball, ball on a string, or even use a flirtpole if keep her from jumping. Take her to the park and have her go up the slides and down the slides and over and under and around and through things. Work obedience in the house and in the back yard for five minutes at a time as many times a day as you can. Take her out to the open field more often or take her hiking/trail walking. I love Jakoda's suggestion of getting the puppy in the car and taking them somewhere every single day.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was just scared about over doing it, maybe I did a little too much reading!

When you say work obedience regularly, is that with treats too? We use puppy coachies which are 1 calorie per treat?
 
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