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Hi all!
Diesel is at the age where it is time to get him neutered (as the veterinarian would say the responsible thing to do as an owner). However we have had no issues with our Diesel; marking, lifting his leg, and humping. My friend (who is a breeder of aussies, trainer) suggested a vasectomy. I am doing my research on this and have a phone call into a vet that preforms this procedure in my area.

I was curious if anyone else has had this done or has heard of this?
 

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Back in the 1950's when I was a kid, NO ONE bothered neutering male dogs! It does NOT stop them from lifting their leg, and in most cases, it doesn't affect aggression towards other dogs. Early neutering before one year, can cause numerous problems, from cancer to cruicate ligament rupture: http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

When I got a mature male GSD, I had NO intention of neutering him: I had a securely fenced yard, and I wasn't planning to let him run loose in the neighbourhood, sowing his wild oats!

Unfortunately, he developed a very bad case of prostatitis and the vet said neutering was the best way to fix it. If that hadn't happened, I would have left him intact.

And why would you want to stop your dog from lifting his leg to urinate? Most male dogs that squat to pee PEE ON THEIR FRONT LEGS!!
 

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Well if you responsibly train your dog and have a good handle on him you shouldn't have any issues. Other than maybe him escaping your yard if there are intact females in heat and he's so inclined.

Vasectomy wouldn't be bad for piece of mind. I know in people it has the chance of healing itself so I'd ask your vet about if they do fertility checks to make sure it took. Keep in mind it will only affect his ability to reproduce. But will not change any potential behaviors or health effects associated with intact males.

Honestly I'm considering doing it in any future make dogs I get or talking to vets and asking about things like epididymies that they do in bulls to produce gomers. Curious about the differences in it versus a vasectomy and if it would work or be okay to do on dogs.


Why even bother? Hes not doing anything wrong.
The responsible thing to do is to make sure your dog doesn't procreate. Not get him neutered. Hormones are necessary for a reason.
They aren't talked about neutering they're talking about a vasectomy which would leave all hormones intact... He wouldn't be able to procreate so absolutely no accidents. But would remains all body parts and such.
 

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If your dog is always controlled, not roaming the neighborhood and running around off-leash out of sight, why neuter? Why get a vasectomy, even? The responsible thing to do is just control your dog. You're probably already doing that!

If you have doubts about your dog getting out of your control and you want to "be responsible" then IMO a vasectomy would be better because your dog does need the hormones to keep developing and behaving normally.

My dog is a year old. He gets "the humpies" (doesn't try to mount people though), he has just tentatively started lifting the leg to mark, and this is normal for what is essentially a teenager male dog. I don't worry about it.
 

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A vasectomy only makes him sterile but maintains hormones , like in human males. As long as you don't have an intact female in the house and you prevent him from escaping, you can handle him just as you are doing right now without a vasectomy. Neutering is the only thing vets and techs seem think of when they see balls. Vets who are better educated actually discourage this for their responsible owner-clients. I wouldn't put him through surgery at all.
Years ago I brought in my intact male Whippet for tumor removal (previous vet clinic). On the consent form for surgery I wrote with a sharpie "No Neutering!" as I envisioned my dog lying on his back with his balls exposed and the vet "doing me a service". The tech looked at the form and said, "But is is so tempting!" Grrrrr..... exactly the reason for the extra comment.
 

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With the exception of lifting a leg, the issues you list are training problems, not because a dog is intact. My 5 year old intact male does none of those things, not even lifting a leg to pee.

I am a responsible owner and won't neuter this dog unless it's medically necessary. I also won't breed him. I feel that there is no reason to do any surgical procedure as long as you are mindful of your dog and you don't let him run loose.

How old is your dog?
 

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Yes we are responsible dog owners, we have a fenced in yard he can not get out. He is not around intact female dogs unless there may be one at the dog park. He is a very good boy. We have other male dogs that come to our house and mark, and Diesel just smells it doesn't mark over it or anything. He still pees like a girl as well.

My only concern about altering him in anyway, is his temperament. He is a great family dog, I am his chosen person. He is great with our 6 year old son, protective when he needs to be, but very sweet and friendly; and I would hate for that to change in him. He will be 18 months in Feb. and that is when we had talked about getting him neutered (if were were).
 

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Do you have multiple dogs where an accidental breeding is likely or possible? Does your dog escape your fence or property? If you feel confident in your ability to keep your dog on your property and away from any female dogs you may own, I wouldn't let the vet pressure you into neutering your boy unless there are medical complications that warrant it (ex: an un-descended testicle). If you do feel like neutering is necessary, and it probably isn't, wait until the dog is at least two years old to preserve hormones while he is growing. A vasectomy is certainly a valid option if you feel like there's a chance of an accidental breeding.

Edited to add: I wouldn't worry about his temperament changing because he is intact. Temperament seems to be influenced far more by training and genetics---in my non-expert opinion. :)
 

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In my area, a dog can't be allowed in the local dog parks unless he's neutered, which I kind of understand but at the same time, it's annoying. Not sure what your local park rules say.
Can't take un-neutered dogs to the franchise indoor dog daycares either. This info didn't improve my initial impressions about dog parks and dog daycare centers!
18 mos IMO is still too early for neutering and truly, I wouldn't do it at all unless he had a medical issue like testicular cancer or something.
 

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In my area, a dog can't be allowed in the local dog parks unless he's neutered, which I kind of understand but at the same time, it's annoying. Not sure what your local park rules say.
Can't take un-neutered dogs to the franchise indoor dog daycares either. This info didn't improve my initial impressions about dog parks and dog daycare centers!
18 mos IMO is still too early for neutering and truly, I wouldn't do it at all unless he had a medical issue like testicular cancer or something.
I'm not sure about the dog parks, but when he was a pup I had him going to doggie day care for socialization, and if he was not neutered at 6 months he couldn't go back, so we have never been back.
 

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Do you have multiple dogs where an accidental breeding is likely or possible? Does your dog escape your fence or property? If you feel confident in your ability to keep your dog on your property and away from any female dogs you may own, I wouldn't let the vet pressure you into neutering your boy unless there are medical complications that warrant it (ex: an un-descended testicle). If you do feel like neutering is necessary, and it probably isn't, wait until the dog is at least two years old to preserve hormones while he is growing. A vasectomy is certainly a valid option if you feel like there's a chance of an accidental breeding.

Edited to add: I wouldn't worry about his temperament changing because he is intact. Temperament seems to be influenced far more by training and genetics---in my non-expert opinion. :)
No..
The only time my dog has ever escaped from our backyard is when the kids forget to close the gate or the poolman leaves it open.
 

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Well if you responsibly train your dog and have a good handle on him you shouldn't have any issues. Other than maybe him escaping your yard if there are intact females in heat and he's so inclined.

Vasectomy wouldn't be bad for piece of mind. I know in people it has the chance of healing itself so I'd ask your vet about if they do fertility checks to make sure it took. Keep in mind it will only affect his ability to reproduce. But will not change any potential behaviors or health effects associated with intact males.

Honestly I'm considering doing it in any future make dogs I get or talking to vets and asking about things like epididymies that they do in bulls to produce gomers. Curious about the differences in it versus a vasectomy and if it would work or be okay to do on dogs.




They aren't talked about neutering they're talking about a vasectomy which would leave all hormones intact... He wouldn't be able to procreate so absolutely no accidents. But would remains all body parts and such.
I know the difference. My response was to the vet stating it's the responsible thing to do....
 

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The responsible thing to do is keep your dog in control. That’s part of being a responsible owner. I think too many vets envision dogs running loose breeding everything in sight resulting in over population. We’ve only had one male (that was in 1974) he remained intact. Since then we’ve had only females. Didn’t spay a single one. I know that there are some health issues to consider but I’ve always believed that leaving your dog intact is best for the dog?
 

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Back in the 1950's when I was a kid, NO ONE bothered neutering male dogs! It does NOT stop them from lifting their leg, and in most cases, it doesn't affect aggression towards other dogs. Early neutering before one year, can cause numerous problems, from cancer to cruicate ligament rupture: http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

When I got a mature male GSD, I had NO intention of neutering him: I had a securely fenced yard, and I wasn't planning to let him run loose in the neighbourhood, sowing his wild oats!

Unfortunately, he developed a very bad case of prostatitis and the vet said neutering was the best way to fix it. If that hadn't happened, I would have left him intact.

And why would you want to stop your dog from lifting his leg to urinate? Most male dogs that squat to pee PEE ON THEIR FRONT LEGS!!
Maybe doesn't effect actual aggression but it definitely does effect social behavior and intact dogs can be obnoxious.
 

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Not neutering is up to the owner, but please realize that there are negatives to keeping a dog intact beyond accidental litters. Intact females are prone to very high risk of pyometra later in life - from 25% to 50% depending on the studies I've read. Pyometra is fatal if left untreated, and the surgery can be very dangerous for an older dog. Mammary tumors are also a real risk and increases greatly in intact females. If a dog is not for breeding, spaying at age 2-3 is probably best for her health.

Intact males are prone to prostate issues and testicular cancer. I believe in keeping males intact and controlling their breeding access, but it's not a cure-all to keep those testicles. If it was, us humans would have very few medical issues as most of us are intact.

Intact males are usually perfectly social to people, but certainly it can affect male-male aggression, and raise the risk of dog fights. Social interactions will also be different to some degree. I know perfectly social intact males, but others that are not where it is clearly a function of hormones.

Why in the world would NOT lifting a leg to urinate in a male dog be a good thing? I don't understand that. This is typical and natural and hygienic for both neutered and intact male dogs.
 
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