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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What are ALL the things I should do before I decide to breed or determine whether my dog is breeding worthy? A list would be nice.

And what about ALL the things that go well beyond the minimum requirements? At the highest level of breeding? Like Lord's Schutzhund/IPO training.

Like maybe different categories?

Health (OFA, OFEL, DM, etc)
Training (Schutzhund/IPO, agility, tracking, K9, etc)
Clubs (where to find them, what different ones there are) in the PNW
Events (different events around the world and locally)
Titles (all the different possible titles and how to get them)

What else? I know I can go hunt all over the forums in each respective section, but just for the sake of breeding/simply working/proving your dog, a compiled list would be very helpful I think.

I would like to know immediate actions I can take and straight forward steps to take rather than discussing the nature of breeding like choosing complimentary mates and temperament, feel free to bring it up if need be, but I mainly want to locate the/a source(s) where I can go and gain all the necessary information by going to the access point so to speak.

I am good at learning as I observe in real-time, but of course first gather all the necessary concepts and groundwork of understanding, so if I can go to a club or event that would explain all this it would be the most effective way I think.
 

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For Schutzhund specifically, find a club, go meet the members and watch the training. If you are a good fit, the club will extend membership to you. Stay quiet, listen, and observe. You will realize that you dog most likely isn't the best candidate for breeding and that's ok. Train your current dog and become a better handler for your next dog. Find a mentor, someone who's really willing to take you under their wing. Schutzhund has a way of exposing weaknesses in your dog you might not see otherwise. Search the United Schutzhund Club of America's site to find a list of clubs by region.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For Schutzhund specifically, find a club, go meet the members and watch the training. If you are a good fit, the club will extend membership to you. Stay quiet, listen, and observe. You will realize that you dog most likely isn't the best candidate for breeding and that's ok. Train your current dog and become a better handler for your next dog. Find a mentor, someone who's really willing to take you under their wing. Schutzhund has a way of exposing weaknesses in your dog you might not see otherwise. Search the United Schutzhund Club of America's site to find a list of clubs by region.
Yes, I have already found clubs in my region, will be joining/going to one soon.

You will realize that you dog most likely isn't the best candidate for breeding and that's ok.
Why do you think this? Any reason in particular? Have you seen my dog's pedigree? She has a Lord in her bloodline, one of the top working-line dog breeders in Schutzhund IPO (I linked the thread in OP). And I know this doesn't guarantee anything, but at least I know for a fact that Schutzhund trained dogs are in her bloodline.
 

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Yes, I have already found clubs in my region, will be joining/going to one soon.


Why do you think this? Any reason in particular? Have you seen my dog's pedigree? She has a Lord in her bloodline, one of the top working-line dog breeders in Schutzhund IPO (I linked the thread in OP). And I know this doesn't guarantee anything, but at least I know for a fact that Schutzhund trained dogs are in her bloodline.
One famous dog in the pedigree doesn't mean anything. How the pedigree blends together is what matter. Is your dog a good example of it's genetics? My first dog, is from titled working stock, yet he wasn't the best example of the bloodlines behind him. Doesn't mean he was a bad dog, all it means is that he's not a good candidate for breeding. You only want the best example of bloodlines breeding so that you have the greatest chance of passing on the positive traits.

Here is his pedigree. If you look, he has several famous dogs in his bloodlines, yet those famous dogs behind him do squat to prove breedworthiness.
Baccus z vom Weberhaus

Also Lord, I'm assuming you mean Lord vom Gleisdreieck was a very good dog, but his accomplishments aren't your dog's accomplishments.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One famous dog in the pedigree doesn't mean anything. How the pedigree blends together is what matter. Is your dog a good example of it's genetics? My first dog, is from titled working stock, yet he wasn't the best example of the bloodlines behind him. Doesn't mean he was a bad dog, all it means is that he's not a good candidate for breeding. You only want the best example of bloodlines breeding so that you have the greatest chance of passing on the positive traits.

Here is his pedigree. If you look, he has several famous dogs in his bloodlines, yet those famous dogs behind him do squat to prove breedworthiness.
Baccus z vom Weberhaus

Also Lord, I'm assuming you mean Lord vom Gleisdreieck was a very good dog, but his accomplishments aren't your dog's accomplishments.
Sure, but there's a higher chance that's all. But I know what you're saying of course, it's no guarantee.

Here's the one I'm talking about:
Lord von den Grauen von Monstab
 

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Sure, but there's a higher chance that's all. But I know what you're saying of course, it's no guarantee.

Here's the one I'm talking about:
Lord von den Grauen von Monstab
It doesn't really, every GSD has a famous parent, grandparent, or great grand parent. It's obvious you love your dog, but you can't let that blind you. I want to breed eventually, but it's a process. To do it right you will have to spend several years working different dogs, observing other peoples dogs, learning pedigrees, finding out your likes and dislikes. You might find there's a particular bloodline you favor, but then you must learn the what positive traits and what negative traits of that particular bloodlines. When you finally learn that you must learn which bloodlines cross well, and which don't. It's several years worth of study to be able to pick out a particular partner for your bitch, let alone actually breeding them after you've done the proper health testing(not just going to your vet, actually submitting your x-rays for evaluation) and titling.

I love my boy, he taught be to be a better owner, and handler. He introduced me to schutzhund, without him I would have never found my club or my mentor, but I'm not blind to what he shows me about himself. I just purchased my current pup(different bloodlines) and Bogo seems to be a better representative of his pedigree. Here's his pedigree.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
It doesn't really, every GSD has a famous parent, grandparent, or great grand parent. It's obvious you love your dog, but you can't let that blind you. I want to breed eventually, but it's a process. To do it right you will have to spend several years working different dogs, observing other peoples dogs, learning pedigrees, finding out your likes and dislikes. You might find there's a particular bloodline you favor, but then you must learn the what positive traits and what negative traits of that particular bloodlines. When you finally learn that you must learn which bloodlines cross well, and which don't. It's several years worth of study to be able to pick out a particular partner for your bitch, let alone actually breeding them after you've done the proper health testing(not just going to your vet, actually submitting your x-rays for evaluation) and titling.

I love my boy, he taught be to be a better owner, and handler. He introduced me to schutzhund, without him I would have never found my club or my mentor, but I'm not blind to what he shows me about himself. I just purchased my current pup(different bloodlines) and Bogo seems to be a better representative of his pedigree. Here's his pedigree.
I suppose. It's really not up to me, but rather the tests that have to be passed when it comes down to it. I understand how long the process can be, well, good thing I have plenty of time even if it's this dog. And also, do realize that even if the dog isn't some superbreed or whatever, just like you say, just because there are famous dogs in their blood doesn't mean the litter will be just as good, so the same goes the other way around, just because a dog is normal, doesn't mean it can't produce an outstanding litter, as long as you are as sure as possible that at the very least it is healthy and doesn't have genetic faults prone to be passed on that's the main issue, I believe. Of course the more experienced you are the more you may be able to breed more consistently high quality breeds, like pairing, etc., but in the end it's all in hopes of passing on the right genes/traits.
 

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I may be mistaken, but the thread you linked was Not the Lord in your dogs pedigree. That dog in the video is Lord v Gleisdreiek.


Looks like you already have a nice list going. Some things like locations of trials and shows, you are going to have find for yourself. I live in Maryland, so researching show opportunities in the PNW is not high on my to do list.

There are quite a few good GSD breeders out that way. How about contacting one and seeing if they would be open to a mentorship.
 

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Not a breeder, and new to this particular breed (not new to dogs), so take this for what it's worth...but a lot of this will carry over. Stream of consciousness blabber to follow:

Start by going out and getting first hand, real world experience. Train and title your dog to prove its ability. CGC isn't enough to say your dog is ready for breeding, but absolutely start there to see if you enjoy working with your dog. Then move on to bigger and better things. Give some other disclipine a try...don't stop at the novice title. Prove to everyone that you have an amazing dog. Observe other dogs at shows and trials and see if you can learn about them. Research, research, research. Know the major lines you will be working with and what they bring to the table. Having met the dogs personally really helps here. Find out what genetics you like, decide the purpose of breeding certain dogs/lines and what you would hope to accomplish and produce from the results of your breeding. Talk with lots of breeders. Don't be in a rush to do anything, if you decide to be a breeder it will be a years-long journey, not a destination of having a litter of puppies. Be a good, reputable, breeder that people can trust by learning as much as you can about every single facet of owning, taking care of, and training the breed. Ask yourself lots of brutal questions and be completely honest with yourself when you answer. When you find some breeders that produce amazing dogs, ask if they will mentor you. Nobody can learn all this stuff on their own. Having a mentor will allow you to get answers to questions you don't even know exist when starting out. A good mentor can hold your hand through tough decisions and help you celebrate in the good times. They should become a friend.

How many examples of the breed have you owned/interacted with? How old are you and where in life are you? What are your biggest worries and concerns?

I hope you can learn a lot here and go on to be successful in what you choose to do! I think from what I have seen in the successful breeders I have met over the years is that they all took their time in educating themselves about every aspect of the breed. Not internet education, but real life education by meeting as many dogs as they could, learning what to look for, being able to interpret what they saw, and having a vision of what they wished to produce.
 

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If you NEED a list of things to determine if your dog is breedworthy, then YOU probably are not ready to be breeding. And I don't mean that flippantly. I mean that breeding is more art than science based on knowledge and experience.....once you acquire knowledge THROUGH experience you will begin to understand what you don't understand and can't be explained in words.
Get out there and do some high level training and experience some quality breeding dogs....then you have a start of at least comparing your dog to something tangible.
 

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Lord v Grauen Monstab and Lord Gleisdreieck very very different dogs.

then you would want to understand the pedigree , Lord Grauen Monstab's dam Sindy Schaferliesel and Boban
Grauen Monstab.

IF that is the Lord dog in your pedigree
 

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And what about ALL the things that go well beyond the minimum requirements? At the highest level of breeding? Like Lord's Schutzhund/IPO training.
I just wanted to point out, that Schutzhund/IPO titles ARE Minimum requirements. Schutzhund was designed as a Breed Test, meaning that only the dogs that earned a minimum of SchH I would be considered breedworthy. This is still a requirement in the SV. That is why so many of the pedigrees of German Showlines and Working lines have nothing BUT SchH titled dogs in their pedigree - without titling, the dogs did not qualify for breeding, and their offspring would not be allowed to be registered.

So if someone is serious about breeding, their goal should be to title their dogs first. By going through the process, you learn about drives and temperament, and that is how you gain an insight into understanding what goes into breeding a good dog, as Cliff pointed out. It is not the title in and of itself that makes a dog breedworthy (even a weak dog can get a title with good training - doesn't make the dog any more suited for breeding post-title than pre-title), but the process of uncovering the dog's strengths and weakness through the training and trialing process is what the title reveals to the person doing the titling - so sending dogs away to be titled, is not an effective way to build credibility as a breeder.
 

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This is the very first thing I was told 18 years ago when I started researching what it took to get a GOOD german shepherd that might be breeding potential.

"What is WRONG with your dog?" Yes, you need to know your dog's good traits but until you can objectively sit down with someone and explain every fault that your dog has, without being offended, you aren't remotely ready to breed. Let alone ready to compete.

People will talk about your dog. They will mention his good points but they will even more loudly point out his flaws. And many of them won't be nearly as nice as the people here have been. Often, going to a working club, they can be even more skeptical of "unusually colored dogs" mostly because they come into it with the idea that the dog was likely not from a responsible breeder. And, again, they can be mean about it.

That thick skin is the first, and most important, step in becoming a breeder. Second is the ability to separate your feelings and love from your dog from your breeding. Third is an objective outlook at the idea of breeding and where a particular dog falls in the spectrum.
 

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This is the very first thing I was told 18 years ago when I started researching what it took to get a GOOD german shepherd that might be breeding potential.

"What is WRONG with your dog?" Yes, you need to know your dog's good traits but until you can objectively sit down with someone and explain every fault that your dog has, without being offended, you aren't remotely ready to breed. Let alone ready to compete.

People will talk about your dog. They will mention his good points but they will even more loudly point out his flaws. And many of them won't be nearly as nice as the people here have been. Often, going to a working club, they can be even more skeptical of "unusually colored dogs" mostly because they come into it with the idea that the dog was likely not from a responsible breeder. And, again, they can be mean about it.

That thick skin is the first, and most important, step in becoming a breeder. Second is the ability to separate your feelings and love from your dog from your breeding. Third is an objective outlook at the idea of breeding and where a particular dog falls in the spectrum.
THIS, a hundred times, this!!

As I explained to you in my last PM, I took a LOT of flack from certain club members because my dog was a mix of American and German showlines, and of course, ASLs have NO working ability, according to some people, and the German showlines are almost as useless. Proved 'em wrong, of course! But people are always going to find something to pick on, in any competitive sport. I put up with exactly the same thing when I used to ride. You learn to grow a thick skin pretty quickly.

Lord vom Gliesdrieck is the famous dog I found multiple times in the 7th and 8th generation of her dog's pedigree. The other Lord is there, too, but Winnal has confused the two. However, as an experienced breeder will tell you, it's the more recent generations of the pedigree that have the biggest influence on the dog, and well, those aren't all that great. Dad's side is better than mom's, and after looking at the colours of the dogs in the pedigree, I think I can see where her dog's colour came from. The colours are mostly sable, and a number of them are rather faded silver sables, with white underneath.

I've strongly advised her to get DNA done, so she has a good comeback when people insist the dog isn't purebred. I think it most likely is. And given the pedigree, I think the potential to make a good working dog is definitely there, too.
 

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I don't think I am subscribed to the site and I could see it-Glacier wasn't the OP
I know, I was curious about her dog's pedigree, but when I clicked on Glacier's link, it didn't work. :) It said this: Visible to registered members
 

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I know, I was curious about her dog's pedigree, but when I clicked on Glacier's link, it didn't work. :) It said this: Visible to registered members
if you scroll down to the middle(ish) of the page, you can view the first 3 generations of the pedigree. It's kind of buried in all of the other things and is visible to non-members. Just the more detailed info is hidden
 

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Is there some reason this dogs pedigree is such a well kept secret?
Seems to me that if I had questions about a dogs potential that would be the first step. Especially with the knowledge pool available here.
 
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