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I was looking at leather collars and I'm not really sure what an agitation collar is for?

Is it everyday use to have a handle on your dog, or are you somehow suppose to use it to agitate him?


Don't laugh, I'm being serious.
 

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For protection work

The wider collar stops some of the pressure on the neck as the dog is straining against the leash.

You want to see a whole bunch of people lose body fluids, have one fail when the decoy is about one foot away from my male who is backtied.
 

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We laugh about it now but it was actually a very dangerous situation. Luckily my decoy/trainer is very very good with very fast reflexes.

The wider collar distributes the tension better around the neck as the dog is being worked. Some of them are even padded.

In some areas of protection training the dog is pulling very strongly and you actually use that in the training.

Clear as mud, right? LOL
 

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Originally Posted By: Betty101For protection work

The wider collar stops some of the pressure on the neck as the dog is straining against the leash.

You want to see a whole bunch of people lose body fluids, have one fail when the decoy is about one foot away from my male who is backtied.
What is "backtied"?

How do you get the dogs worked up? I don't much(any) about protection work.....
 

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Much of protection work involves backtying the dog. He's tied to a tree or a post and aggitated by the helper. The purpose of the backtying is to provide absolute clarity as to where the dog can reach, and where he can't. This is important for the safety of the helper, and the quality of the work as it prevents the dog from biting where and when he shouldn't. The same can be done with the handler holding the dog on a line, but backtying is safer and more reliable, especially with novice handlers... handlers can move and get pulled off balance or have the line pulled through their hands, trees can't. It also allows the handler to move up and be with their dog, encouraging and supporting or helping position the dog, rather than stuck behind just holding a line.

When doing backtie work the dog will be straining to get to the helper. Then need something safe, secure and comfortable to pull into.... either a harness (my preference) or an aggitation collar. An aggitation collar is stronger, wider, and usually padded compared to a regular collar so it's better and safer and won't cut off the dog's air when they pull against it.
 

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To illustrate.... since a picture is worth a thousand words...

Protection done with the dog backtied to a tree (in this case on a harness), with the handler up near the dog. You can probably see from the photo why it's important for the dog to be held in place and for the helper to know exactly where the dog can reach and where it can't.


 

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Backtying also increases the desire to bite of the dog because of the frustration produced by the helper being out of its reach. If the handler is not strong enough and the dog is able to move him, even a few inches all the frustration goes into pulling, if the dog is sure he can't go any further he attempts other behaviours and that can be used by the helper.
 

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Backtying isn't mean or inhumane?
Not meant to be inflamitory. I know the answer is no our you wouldn't do it but it is confusing to me. Is that type of dog always a kennel dog or can it be a house pet as well as excel in this sport.

Again, I truely just want to know. I do not want to step on toes. Just want to learn.
 

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This is a completely different situation than what I think you're thinking of....

Tying a dog up to a tree and leaving it to live that way is mean and inhumane.

Tying a dog to a tree for a training session is tying a dog to a tree for a training session. These dog's aren't left tied to trees for extended periods of time. A protection session usually lasts 10-20 minutes, generally no more or both helper and dog are too tired, all or part of that session may involve backtying the dog or it may not.

Backtying is a necessary part of the training for the many reasons stated in this thread. The same could be accomplished if the handler was holding the leash instead of a tree doing so. It's just sometimes safer, more practical and often more conducive to a successful training session to have the dog tied to an immovable object and the dog's handler free to move about.

This is just part of protection training that all schutzhund (and police, and military, and other protection trained) dogs go through. And no, this type of dog isn't always a kennel dog. Some are, many live in the homes with their handlers. The dog pictured above lives in the house, cuddles on the couch, sleeps on the bed, accompanies her owner on errands, goes on camping and hiking trips, etc... She's also a pet, as are most schutzhund dogs.
 

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I can definitely see why the tree would be so much safer. Dogs that are that frustrated and focused are STRONG, stronger so than usual because they want it so bad, so I would definitely prefer the tree with the harness in this situation.

I'm just observing, never done any Schutzhund work unfortunately .
 

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I don't do SchH, but from what is explained I would think back tying with a solid object (tree, post cemented in the ground) verses a human holding the dog, the solid object would be better with some dogs. Not just from a safety stand point, but a dogs physical awarness, the human may not be able to actually hold their spot and the dog could feel any additional ground he/she gained and that may not be what you are trying to teach the dog at that point.
 

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And add that this way the handler has his two hands free to correct with a prong if needed or to encourage a behavior with a good pat in the back. Or just by being there at his side giving the dog confidence in a calm disposition and not way back struggling and in distress himself.
 

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Thanks Chris. I was totally pictureing something differnt. Like how they train pitts to be mean. I knew I had it wrong but thanks for clarifying. Now I do not feel so stupid. I would love to go watch sometime. How do you find local chapters?
 

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Originally Posted By: mjb03Thanks Chris. I was totally pictureing something differnt. Like how they train pitts to be mean. I knew I had it wrong but thanks for clarifying. Now I do not feel so stupid. I would love to go watch sometime. How do you find local chapters?

google - United Shutzhund Clubs of America. Thats what I did, because I am very interested in shutzhund training.
 
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