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Even if the dog is fine with you, aggressive dogs are a nightmare for anyone who might come in contact with them. Your parents, significant other, vets, groomers, boarders, house sitters… you only know how the dog acts around others when you’re there, and when you’re not there it might be a totally different story. What if you’re not home, how will your parents manage an aggressive dog? You put him in a crate, but what if he breaks out and begins to terrorize “intruders” (such as your parent’s invited guests, or the maintenance guy)? It sounds like a ridiculous hypothetical scenario but it’s happened to someone I know. It’s not a situation I would want to put anyone in, especially not my loved ones.
 

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I read an interesting article that tells a story of a military dog that retired to an apartment in Washington DC with a civilian owner. The article mentioned that some handlers decide against adopting their former partner and it’s ok.
 

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I lived in a room that was 8' x 12' with Fama, for a year.

A huge change for a military dog is not spending all their time out of the kennel working or training. It's a massive adjustment for them.

Another thing is not having their handler there all the time when they are out. Typically, when a military dog is out of the kennel, it is right there with the handler.

This is a complicated transition, and handlers are not trainers.
 
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With my dogs in apartments, other dogs are a much bigger issue than other people. While I do encounter some people I my apartments who will go to meet a dog without permission or inquiry, it’s rare. It’s more of an issue when I run into drunks. No person has ever not respected me when I said no. Dogs present a whole another level of issue. It’s easy to tell people no. You’re more likely to run into restistance as far as no interactions. People are much better at controlling themselves than their dogs. There’s the issue of running into other dogs who are reactive and untrained. This issue tends to flair up at choke points like elevators. The answer to all of these for me has been training control. My dogs aren’t overly sharp or people aggressive. Only one has had issues with dog aggression. This is my experience as far as living in apartments with dogs. I also always walk my dogs on the live ring of a fur saver or a prong. This gives me good control of them physically if things flare up.
 

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I read an interesting article that tells a story of a military dog that retired to an apartment in Washington DC with a civilian owner. The article mentioned that some handlers decide against adopting their former partner and it’s ok.
What a wonderful story. So proud of Rebecca, she hung in there & gave Dyngo a chance. Now Dyngo has the forever home he truly deserves. Thank you for your service Dyngo you deserve a wonderfully normal life.
 
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