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I recently adopted a 4 year old MWD. She has her veterinary paperwork but nothing in that indicates her lineage or where ahe ultimately came from. My understanding from net searches is that they procure dogs of czech/dutch background from holland as well as from a breeding program within the states. Was wondering if something ne with direct knowledge can confirm that. The dog i have is a dark sable with red sable on the back of her head and has unique black toes which i havent seen in sables before. So it made me curious of her lineage.

Also i did not receive any training records so i was wondering what obedience training she might have had if any because it seems like i am teachibg her commands for the first time. Might be in a different language but ive tried german, czech, and dutch. At least my best pronunciation of them. My understanding is she was an explosive detection dog with one deployment before being retired to the Tx dps where she could not make the transition to narcotics.
 

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My advice is don't worry about what het previous training may have been or what language. Just train her. It will help build a bond between you.

As far as her color, you could post a pic. But I have a pretty dark sable with red at my feet that is predominantly west german.
 

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The only command i know she knows from a working stand point is “find it”. I was able to talk to the dps trainer who worked with her and that is the command they use to search for narcotics. The reason they failed her was that she would find the narcotic but would secondary commit to the signal.
 

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It used to be mandatory for all MWD to complete basic obedience before going to their specialty....that being said, narcotics and explosives work have less emphasis on ironclad obedience as they want the dog to work uninhibited in using their olfactory senses. The dog should know basic obedience in English.( But it’s possible if dog is import the BO was there and the military went into specialty from there.
 

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Yeah she is a great dog and vastly different from my last gsd. One other issue im having is locating her microchip company to have her switched to my info. Not knowing if she is a european import its been trouble to get the info updated. None of the American companies have her chip on file. Its also in a unique location high on her head rather than on the shoulders
 

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Yeah she is a great dog and vastly different from my last gsd. One other issue im having is locating her microchip company to have her switched to my info. Not knowing if she is a european import its been trouble to get the info updated. None of the American companies have her chip on file. Its also in a unique location high on her head rather than on the shoulders
I had similar confusion with my import GSD. From what I learned, you just need to have the chip scanned, get the chip serial number (from the scan) then register that s/n to you. I used Home Again, but I believe there are other companies that you can register with.

I was also told that the chips can sometimes move around in the body a bit. Beautiful dog!
 

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Yeah she is a great dog and vastly different from my last gsd. One other issue im having is locating her microchip company to have her switched to my info. Not knowing if she is a european import its been trouble to get the info updated. None of the American companies have her chip on file. Its also in a unique location high on her head rather than on the shoulders
Just put in a new one. I prefer Home Again. My vet says it doesn't seem to migrate like others. And I believe it's read by all microchip readers. Just don't fall for the subscription thing they offer. That basically gives you posters if she gets lost.
 

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ive heard about reregistering a chip but due to the location i was worried it wouldnt be found if it were ever needed. On the other hand i was also concerned if she has two if there would be confusion there also.
 

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Found out some info today. My girl is definitely an import dog from holland. The microchip was placed there and is specifically coded for thw US military. So I think the safest thing for me to do is have a new chip placed. Also im wondering if my dog knows any dutch commands. Ill have to look them up with the proper pronunciation.
 

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I recently adopted a 4 year old MWD. She has her veterinary paperwork but nothing in that indicates her lineage or where ahe ultimately came from. My understanding from net searches is that they procure dogs of czech/dutch background from holland as well as from a breeding program within the states. Was wondering if something ne with direct knowledge can confirm that. The dog i have is a dark sable with red sable on the back of her head and has unique black toes which i havent seen in sables before. So it made me curious of her lineage.

Also i did not receive any training records so i was wondering what obedience training she might have had if any because it seems like i am teachibg her commands for the first time. Might be in a different language but ive tried german, czech, and dutch. At least my best pronunciation of them. My understanding is she was an explosive detection dog with one deployment before being retired to the Tx dps where she could not make the transition to narcotics.
Was this dog procured from Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Tx? When I tested dogs for the military we eliminated all pedigree paperwork so it will be almost impossible to find out if the dog is an import or bred here in the states or who the parents were. You most often not receive any training records as well. Also we put a tattoo number in their ear.


"ALL" MWD's are given some form of obedience prior to starting their specialties. All dogs are taught English commands no matter what language they were prior trained in. The basic commands are heel, sit, down, stay, hup and No. The military does not cross train their dogs. If he is narc he will never be cross trained in explosives or vice versa. Some are initially trained as patrol dogs and are trained in bite work, building and area searches, agility course.


Nice looking dog!
 

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It’s interesting you note relatively “weak” obedience. No criticism however. We have an explosives dog in our apt. He is a Mal. Nice looking dog, pretty low key for a Mal. I’ve noticed very lax obedience from the owner/ handler. Almost like he is a rank beginner to dogs. The detection dogs I’ve worked with in the past were multi cross trained. Generally the “bomb” dogs were low key almost to the point of lazy. Very good area search and detection work however. Mostly a step or two above all others.

All other LE dogs were very “tough” dogs. Essentially when the dog came out of the car, all negotiations were over. The dog meant business as in “let’s play ball, you’ve got it I’m going to take it away along with part of you” . All had pretty good basic obedience with required additional actions.

I was visiting the local LE training and I was surprised at the lack of real powerfull dogs. The Mals were pretty fast but not the “line backer” crushers I’m used to. The GSD. Were a bit heavier at around 80 pounds but not real power house dogs of the past.

My own SCH dog was 95-96 pounds no fat and almost 2” over the standard size. A big ex USMC. Turned LE challenged us as being only a sport dog even though my dog had passed all the certifications except area search. After he got back from the ER He gave us the supreme compliment saying that my dog could ride patrol any day with him.
 
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