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I bought my doberman ten years ago...and I'm buying my GSD as well. (Put down the deposit on a current litter that will be ready to come home in March.)

I know great dogs can be found in shelters and rescues....but I also feel comfortable supporting the practice of reputable breeding. I also like to mitigate as much risk as possible with regards to temperament and health issues. :)

I think they're both equally viable options for dog ownership, but a very individual kind of choice.
 

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You’re buying no matter where you get your dog from. The important thing is to support either good, responsible breeders who know what they are doing and health test, or responsible rescues that value making correct placements and not sugarcoating any issues the dogs may have.

My current dogs were all bought from breeders. One was a lesson on what a good breeder actually is, and the other two have turned out to be exactly what I was told they would be.
 

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ALL dogs, even mixed breeds, come from some kind of a breeder. One's choice depends a lot on what kind of a breeder one chooses to encourage and support.

I have owned strays, backyard bred, poor bred and well bred. I do believe that temperamentally the well bred dogs were more stable overall with fewer behavioral issues.
 

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We bought ours after researching and learning lots about the breed. However, and speaking in general terms, when it comes to temperament, aptitudes and lineage inclination; breeders can likely fit those basic wants more so, than dogs that are up for adoption. Having said that, I whole hardly agree with Mr Jax pronouncement; and would venture to go even further: A GSD will love you more than he/she loves him/herself, no matter where it came from. Try finding that same loyalty and unconditionality, in the world that we live in today..:smile2:
 

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I have had very good dogs in my life. As a child my mom brought home a pup from an oops litter, 3/4 lab 1/4 GSD (good mix by the way) I've had a couple of adopted mutts that were fine dogs and an wonderful GSD from the city pound. My latest GSDs have come from a good breeder. I would consider adopting some of her retired dogs when I am old and my current dogs have passed.

We contacted a local GSD rescue before going to the breeder but there were so many hoops to jump through and it was pretty much a one way process with them making all the decisions. So we went to the breeder and worked with her to get a pup that would match our lifestyle.
 

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All of my current dogs were bred by me. I have had one shelter dog and then the rest came from breeders.
 

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Did/would you adopt or buy your puppy?
We bought our dog from a breeder. We wanted a GSD and wanted to make sure it was actually a GSD, hence the breeder. At first, we considered adoption but the process was irritating and overwhelming (getting squashed by an over-excited lab-something turned us off).

In the future, we'll continue to get our GSD from a breeder as we want a healthy, well-balanced dog that is purebred.

That said, we'll always adopt our cats.
 

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We have always bought our dogs (including 3 GSDs over the years) from breeders.



The first reason is simply that we want to be able to socialize the pups from 8 weeks on before they pick up bad habits prior to being re-homed or sheltered. We both work and the thought of having to invest all the time and energy necessary to correct problems makes the money spent to buy from a breeder a bargain (and the odds of finding an 8-12 week old GSD pup up for adoption are slim to none, at least where we live).



The second reason is that we wanted (and nowadays continue to want) a GSD so we know what we're getting within basic breed parameters (intelligent, loyal, internalizes the 'packs' rules well, brave, good energy level but not 'bouncy' or hyperactive, etc.).



The third reason is health. Our first dog and first GSD (back in 1980) was from a back yard breeder on the other side of town (we were young and naive about buying dogs back then). She ended up having hip displasia and we had to put her down at 11 when she couldn't get off the couch even to go out even with using a sling for her rear end. We vowed never to have to do that again for something avoidable and being able to check pedigrees (and nowadays being able to test) has avoided repeats of that kind of tragedy.
 

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I have had very good dogs in my life. As a child my mom brought home a pup from an oops litter, 3/4 lab 1/4 GSD (good mix by the way) I've had a couple of adopted mutts that were fine dogs and an wonderful GSD from the city pound. My latest GSDs have come from a good breeder. I would consider adopting some of her retired dogs when I am old and my current dogs have passed.

We contacted a local GSD rescue before going to the breeder but there were so many hoops to jump through and it was pretty much a one way process with them making all the decisions. So we went to the breeder and worked with her to get a pup that would match our lifestyle.





That seems to be a problem today so I got discouraged when I looked for a dog or others like horses since I have the land. I know they want good homes for the dogs or cats but these rescue groups can’t be all that picky. It’s like applying to a federal security position and back ground checks. Not everybody is rich with expensive vets, dog walkers, have that big beautiful home with all their land fenced in with 6-8 foot tall fencing,trainers galore, multiple incomes, etc=most of us who want to adopt are single living on minimum wages in our 2 bedroom ranch and don’t want some guy showing up anytime they want. My coworker wanted to adopt a cat but because she couldn’t guarantee the impossible= that it will never get out a door or window into the yard, so 3 adoption agencies would not let her adopt and I have heard this many times from others. So she went to the local dog pound and walked out with a cat because they are nowhere near as picky and know these animals mostly don't get a second chance. Do with what you feel in your heart,maybe one from a breeder and one from the plain old dog pound (that’s what I do).






 

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Do with what you feel in your heart,maybe one from a breeder and one from the plain old dog pound (that’s what I do).


In a better world, that is how people ought to be. Do the research. Check the breeder. Check the shelter. Look at the Pros and Cons and choose with your brain and your heart. This doesn't have to be an either / or decision. Being educated consumers / adopters means less profit to poor breeders and better run shelters.
 

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Depends...

I have had both adopted pets (both cats and dogs), as well as pure breeds from respected breeders. I think the first question you have to ask is "what do I want to do with the dog"? If you are looking only for a nice family pet, that you can train in basic obedience, and have no plans for any kind of breeding...then adoption is great. Also, there are lots of great dogs open for adoption that can excel at certain organized sports/activities, but it is often a "lets see what happens", rather than a sure thing. One other thing is that with some breeds, even when mixed, can come with problematic health issues. I have seen several times when indiscriminate backyard breeders decided to "give up the gig" and their dogs end up in shelters (both from them as well as those purchased by their clients), so you can end up with issues. Again, you can find a ton of fantastic dogs for adoption, and even some may be pure breeds, but there are limitations.

As for going to a breeder...the upside (assuming you find a quality breeder) is that you have a better idea of what you are getting...both temperament, workability, and looks (if that is important to you). Also, when dealing with certain breeds i.e. high drive, working line breeds, it is even more important to have a strong understanding of their lineage and potential. Personally, I would not want to get something like a Belgian Mal or Cane Corso without having a well documented health and parental background.

Anyhow...just my 2 cents...I am not a professional breeder or trainer, just a long time dog lover...so take my advice as what it is.

Scott
 

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I've had shelter dogs. I've had strays that ended up staying. I've had rehomed, free, dogs. I've had BYB's. I've had dogs from good breeders.

None meant less than the one before.
Same here. Had dogs from breeders and from humane societies and found strays that stayed. Health issues either way. But I never "adopted" from rescues as they were way too picky.
 

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Ive bought, gotten one through rehoming, and had a couple given to me. My next go around will be purchased from a breeder with specifics in mind and I'll probably adopt senior gsds after that.
 

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Ive bought, gotten one through rehoming, and had a couple given to me. My next go around will be purchased from a breeder with specifics in mind and I'll probably adopt senior gsds after that.
All of my dogs have been to some extent recycled, although I managed to start with several pups along the way. And a few BYB dogs thrown in for good measure. I said I wanted just one dog that came with no baggage, just one that I chose and then I would happily take the seniors out of the shelters. I hate old dogs in shelters, they should never end up there.
 
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