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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know why I am posting this. I think I am just tired and stressed.

I am wondering about people's adolescent dogs and some behaviors I am seeing that I am struggling with. Everything just keeps stacking up and my stress is through the roof.

My relationship with my 9.5 month old puppy has been taking strain lately because of the sheer amount of work he is. Insane energy, always bored. I have no life. I just am constantly trying to either exercise or stimulate him. I get it. He is a puppy. I figured tough it out now and it will be worth it.

Is it normal for fear/ skittishness to come and go all the time? Last week he is doing great, pretty chill on the leash and out and about, lets people walk past etc. Last 3 days its like I don't know who he is. He is so INTENSE! Reactivity at everything. Growling, fur raising. Everything is bothering him. He already got scared a few times before then got a bit better. It just keeps fluctuating. I can't keep up with him.

Then the nipping at strangers started. I was upset, but figured I would just manage his interactions. I'm struggling to read him lately. It's stressful. He was all over people but now he is clearly giving off signals of being uncomfortable touched suddenly or in a certain way. I figure, sure, he is not a labrador, he doesn't need to have people touch him. No big deal, I'm an introvert anyways >.<

Then it happened with my immediate family. My step brother reached over him and he got a fright. He adores him but I don't live with them. Haku sees everyone on Saturday each week. He loves going there.

Then the last straw and cause of recent turmoil. Last night I went to give Haku a kiss/ ear scratch good night, like I have done every night for the past 4 months I have had him, and he looked weird. Just as I thought that I saw his nose wrinkle in the tiniest snarl. I was absolutely stunned. I just froze and said "What on earth was that" in a low voice. Haku ducked his head slightly and looked away, then I left and just went to bed. I am embarrassed to say that I cried myself to sleep. Everything just seems so hard and now I have a dog that doesn't want to be touched and I am now worried about touching him.

I have NEVER had a dog we have owned even THINK about doing this. Is this normal teenage crap I don't understand or am I in trouble here? My family is nervous of him now which is not helping and to be honest I think I am too, just bad timing and I feel emotionally frayed. He is such a huge dog. I have never felt afraid of my dogs, even the fear biter I had.

My trainer says it's him telling me he is uncomfortable and that I need to respect that. I just see 12 years of me being afraid of my dog. I got him because I needed a companion. My only 2 requirements were affectionate and playful.

OMG I am tired. I think I need a vacation.

Another long post sorry. Please tell me about your dog's adolescence and if this is normal.
 

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Oh no, this is Haku II, right?

I don't have good answers but I will be following your thread because I'm somewhat in the same boat. My dog has never liked to be handled by strangers and has growled and snapped at clients and neighbors who become overly familiar with him. For us, the worst offenders have been people who have dogs of their own, and assume that my dog will love having his tummy rubbed, ears scritched, etc but actually my dog is like, "keep your hands away from me!!" Anyway I know the feeling of worrying that one's dog will hurt someone.

What we do is, if we are having a sleepover at our house or having guests stay over for a few days, we just board our dog. So much less stress that way. With clients or people who are just visiting for a few hours, I just tell them to ignore him. He will never do a thing as long you ignore him.

It really sucks to pour your life and energy into your dog and have him snarl at you...I totally get that!!

Hopefully he's just going through a phase. I don't know if people will tell you that you need to discipline/"crack down" on him more and earn his respect? Or just avoid doing things that make him uncomfortable?

Although my dog is sweet to me, I've wondered how to get him to be better with other people not in our family. Anyway I hope you find some answers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi GSDchoice,

Yes Haku II :'( I think maybe I am not meant to own this breed. I feel like such a loser.

While it sucks that you have similar problems with strangers, I am glad it is not just me. Haku is so confusing. He will be all giddy and happily say hello, then 30min later that person will go to touch him and he is like "Ah! No!" and gives a warning nip. Or is hyper aware of where they are. I have also had to tell my family not to cuddle him as I am scared he bites someone. In every other regard he is just a normal mischievous energetic puppy (I think). He does really struggle to settle down and now I am getting paranoid, like he may be genetically anxious and my life is going to be crap. He is more fearful than I originally thought which sucks. It just all seems too much and I am terrified I start hating him. Until the snarl I was sure I loved him but didn't always like him lol. But that snarl had an impact on me that surprised even myself. Agh.

I better buy another bottle of Rescue Remedy for myself :O
 

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It's not an easy breed...that, I have learned. :)

I guess the initial checklist would be, is Haku getting daily exercise? is he getting training ("work")?

When you feel scared of him...maybe you could ask him to Sit, and run through some training exercises...when you see him doing your bidding, that may help you to realize that he is still 'your dog'. There were a few times in the past when I saw my dog growl/snap at the vet or strangers and I felt wary of him when I got home. Seeing him Sit on command and gazing up at me with his same earnest brown eyes...it somehow reassured me that he wasn't some savage wild beast...he was still 'my dog' even though I had seen that he was capable of some scary behavior.

Anyway hopefully there will be better answers here for you.
 

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Remember puberty? Where your hormones were all out of wack, and you wanted to cry one second, and have a manic laughing fit a second later? Always grouchy and snapping at people? I had 4 boys (two mine, two step that lived with us full time), and all 4 started hitting puberty one right after another. I wanted to throttle them all. Daily.

Dogs go through the same thing, they just can’t vocalize it the way humans can, and are not as easy to read as a human.

He is setting you up with all the proper warning signs, but it seems like you, and those around you, aren’t heeding them, so he is resorting to physically showing you.

Puppies love hugs and kisses, just like children. Teenagers would rather eat someone else’s spit than allow you to hug or kiss them. But it passes. And you get your dog back at maturity, but it will likely not be the same super affectionate dog he was as a pup, which is completely normal!

I’m still stumped as to why people allow other people to touch or handle their dog when they are in this stage. The dog is unpredictable due to hormone changes. Make a clear and concise rule that no one approach or pet your dog. If the dog seeks out the attention, great, but don’t get up on their faces. A lot of dogs feel threatened with someone holding a hand over their head to be pet, and most don’t like head petting from strangers, or people they see once a week.

If you want a more sociable dog, you should have gone with a different breed. Yes, some GSD’s can be super affectionate and playful and sociable around strangers or groups of people, but there are more that aren’t like that than there are ones like that.

My 9yr old will seek affection and love from me, but she doesn’t tolerate anyone else trying to give her affection. Very very rarely will she approach anyone besides me for pets. And even then, war scratches are fine, but not head pets. Body pets only.

My Husky/GSD is overly affectionate with everyone, dogs included. He got more of the husky temperament than the GSD temperament, which means he has crazy high drive, and needs to be worked and trained and exercised constantly, or he turns into the destroyer and chews up everything in his path.

My 5 month old GSD wants constant cuddles and love. I’m not naive, I know it’s her puppy personality, and it will likely disappear after leaving the puppy stage. And I’m so okay with that. The aloofness of the breed is one of the things I love about them. I don’t want strangers trying to pet my dogs, and I make that clear. I don’t want a dog that is needy and needs to be pet all the time, and loved on constantly. I want what the breed offers, and that’s a bond that is nearly unbreakable, without the insane amount of affection required with other breeds do get that bond. I like working dogs. I like dogs that have a purpose other than being a lap dog. I want a dog that can hike a few miles with me in good weather, and be perfectly happy just being by my side. I like dogs I can run a course with, and see the happiness in their eyes when they complete it and get praise and tug time.

If you are okay having a dog like that, rather than one that wants to lay in your lap and give kisses and cuddles, stick it out, it will get better. But if you want a dog that wants to lay in your lap and cuddles and kisses and just shows love constantly, I agree with the statement that the GSD breed isn’t for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
He is still lovely with obedience. I use positive training and he is still excited to do any session. Waits through doorways, doesn't leash pull and seems eager. I am trying to not overreact and tell myself just because he did not want to be cuddled, doesn't mean he is going to randomly maul me. He is just unpredictable and the trust is gone. I probably need to just back way off.

Regarding exercise and "work" I am doing my best. So much so that, like I said, our relationship is taking strain. He goes to daycare 2 times a week to play. He is crated the other 3 days while I work but I play fetch probably 3-4 times and he has 2 walks. Fetch and walk in the morning then another 30min at lunch then fetch and walk after work and I try go somewhere like a park or something (on his less reactive days) A month ago I could take him to petsmart he was a dream. Now he is too skittish again and so dog reactive he drags me so thats a no lol.... I feed him in kongs and puzzle toys and do about 30 min of obedience and relaxation protocol before dinner. I was going to obedience classes once a week but our latest class got cancelled so now I am seeing the trainer 1 on 1. we just started.

Weekends I hike him on a long lead from about 10-12:30, grassy fields and forest trails, then after he wakes up a few hours later it's intermittent fetch and nosework games. If I am at my parents house he wont settle until 10pm.

Last few weekends I have been teaching him to paddle board and we play fetch in the lake where he swims for about 40min.

I recently had lunch with a friend who owns a husky mix and an Australian Cattle dog. She said I am doing too much stimulating exercise with him and need to up the amount of kongs etc. So I am trying that. She does WAY less with her dogs. we will see. Haku whines and gets frustrated with the frozen Kongs after a bit.

I am tired just reading that. I am an introvert artist. Epic life choice fail.
 

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Remember puberty? Where your hormones were all out of wack, and you wanted to cry one second, and have a manic laughing fit a second later? Always grouchy and snapping at people? I had 4 boys (two mine, two step that lived with us full time), and all 4 started hitting puberty one right after another. I wanted to throttle them all. Daily.

Dogs go through the same thing, they just can’t vocalize it the way humans can, and are not as easy to read as a human.

He is setting you up with all the proper warning signs, but it seems like you, and those around you, aren’t heeding them, so he is resorting to physically showing you.

Puppies love hugs and kisses, just like children. Teenagers would rather eat someone else’s spit than allow you to hug or kiss them. But it passes. And you get your dog back at maturity, but it will likely not be the same super affectionate dog he was as a pup, which is completely normal!

I’m still stumped as to why people allow other people to touch or handle their dog when they are in this stage. The dog is unpredictable due to hormone changes. Make a clear and concise rule that no one approach or pet your dog. If the dog seeks out the attention, great, but don’t get up on their faces. A lot of dogs feel threatened with someone holding a hand over their head to be pet, and most don’t like head petting from strangers, or people they see once a week.

If you want a more sociable dog, you should have gone with a different breed. Yes, some GSD’s can be super affectionate and playful and sociable around strangers or groups of people, but there are more that aren’t like that than there are ones like that.

My 9yr old will seek affection and love from me, but she doesn’t tolerate anyone else trying to give her affection. Very very rarely will she approach anyone besides me for pets. And even then, war scratches are fine, but not head pets. Body pets only.

My Husky/GSD is overly affectionate with everyone, dogs included. He got more of the husky temperament than the GSD temperament, which means he has crazy high drive, and needs to be worked and trained and exercised constantly, or he turns into the destroyer and chews up everything in his path.

My 5 month old GSD wants constant cuddles and love. I’m not naive, I know it’s her puppy personality, and it will likely disappear after leaving the puppy stage. And I’m so okay with that. The aloofness of the breed is one of the things I love about them. I don’t want strangers trying to pet my dogs, and I make that clear. I don’t want a dog that is needy and needs to be pet all the time, and loved on constantly. I want what the breed offers, and that’s a bond that is nearly unbreakable, without the insane amount of affection required with other breeds do get that bond. I like working dogs. I like dogs that have a purpose other than being a lap dog. I want a dog that can hike a few miles with me in good weather, and be perfectly happy just being by my side. I like dogs I can run a course with, and see the happiness in their eyes when they complete it and get praise and tug time.

If you are okay having a dog like that, rather than one that wants to lay in your lap and give kisses and cuddles, stick it out, it will get better. But if you want a dog that wants to lay in your lap and cuddles and kisses and just shows love constantly, I agree with the statement that the GSD breed isn’t for you.
Hi Jchrest. Thanks for your honesty. I will definitely take your advice about the no touching by others. That was never an issue for me. I was pleasantly surprised when he was 5 months old how affectionate to everyone he was and secretly hoped it would stick, but it obviously didn't and I am okay with that. I knew that about the breed. The aloofness to strangers part. But I also thought that they were fine and affectionate with their own family. This is the part that I am struggling with. Sure maybe he will never be a cuddle-bug, am I disappointed? Absolutely, I remember researching on this very forum before I even started looking for a dog to see if I could have an affectionate Shepherd or not. But I get it, it's who he is. But not being able to touch him? That just plain sucks I'm sorry. Especially since he couldn't care less about praise either. I suppose we will just work it out. Thanks for the adolescence description with the hormones. It's hard to remember when everything seems so overwhelming.
 

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Gsd’s are an introverts dream breed, I don’t know why you’re making that a negative quality to have. Heck, I only socialize with my children, occasionally my husband, and even more occasionally, the one sister I talk to. I’m happiest at home talking to strangers on a dog forum than I would be going to Disney land.

If the activities are wearing you out, throttle back on some. I don’t mind having to work mine all the time, because it’s a passion and hobby of mine, and I truly enjoy it. I don’t look at it and get exhausted, I get excited. There is nothing wrong with saying it’s not enjoyable for you, and feels like a chore. Many people feel that way. As long as he is exercised enough to keep him happy and not destructive, you should be fine! Don’t put that pressure on yourself always be exercising or playing with your dog every free second you have. Enjoy some dog free time. No one will fault you for that, most people have lives outside their dogs.
 

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The not wanting to be touched by you will pass. He will seek affection when he’s in the mood, it just may not be the your face in his face giving him a kiss on the head.

My human boys used to cuddle me constantly. If I was sitting, they were glued to my lap. If I was laying down, they were right there next to me. Kisses and hugs alllll the time. Puberty hit, and they got annoyed if I was in the same room with them half the time. Forget kisses and cuddles and hugs!!! After that hormone flood evened out, they were perfectly happy to hug me again, and they hugged me often, but no more kisses. It was just weird at that age. You me dog will want to interact with you again, it’s just not going to be as loving in the same way. You might not get kisses, but when he rolls over for belly rubs, your heart will melt. When you’re taking a shower and see him peeking his head in to make sure everything is okay with you, you will melt again.

Even with as much as I love working and training my dogs, some days I wake up and say, you know what, I need a day off. I take a me day, no kids, no dogs, and spend the day reading, or working in the garden, or working on one of my furniture projects. I don’t think anyone can be devoted to something 24/7 and not get burnt out!
 

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Oh, and as for the touching, my 9yr old isn’t too keen on it, but if I lay down on the floor, she stretches out in front of me. She the little spoon, I’m the big spoon, and she lets me put my arm around her and lay there with her. So like I said, the way the affection comes may be different from what they expressed as puppies, but they still find ways. I love laying down and cuddling with Lyka. Crios does the same with my girls. Seiran just jumps all over our faces and tries to eat our hair ?
 

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I can't believe your trainer said to respect him when he snarls at you. Time to ad leadership to the positive training methods and maybe find another trainer who is familiar with GSDs. Respect from you won't cut it.u have to WORK him through this age. At least apply NILIFF: Nothing In Life Is For Free (plenty of info on this forum about this). Adolescence is not the easiest time but it is never an excuse for the behavior you are describing. he alos needs more challenging exercise; physical and mentally. Doggy Day care might not be ideal anymore as it may give him too much freedom to make decisions, depending on how they manage it.
 

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Moonshayde, I'm kinda in the same boat. Last year, he was hard to pet or hug or kiss or etc. His mouth was always open like he's ready to bite. Now, he is 18 months old. Most of the time he "likes" (or tolerates) my hugs and kisses and pats and whatevers. And then there are times, he gives me the snarl and if I linger too much, the snap. And when he does that, I immediately disagree with the behavior and say "No." I've resigned to the fact that he will never be as friendly (to everyone), and cuddly like my previous one. I'm ok with it. Different dogs, different personalities. If I wanted a cuddly dog, I would've picked another breed. Don't get me wrong...he's not void of all affection. Mostly...affection comes on his terms. I think you need to build on your bond with him...and then maybe the affection will come.

About your stress, I get it. I've been there...twice (with 2 dogs). I've learned that I had to power through it and keep telling myself that it will get better. And yes, at 18 months old, he is much better. He still has his moments but they're much easier to handle now. You have to force yourself to take breaks to "refresh." Btw, I hope your dog's crate trained because this is where the crate comes in handy. Put him in the crate and take an hour or 2 for a nap or go see a movie or catch up on emails or whatever. It really helps. If you have family members living with you, ask them to help, like someone feeds the dinner meal. Or someone takes the dog out at whatever time. If you're like me and you're doing everything on your own, then make sure you take your breaks.
 

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This too shall pass. I was convinced my puppy came straight up from ****. For a long time. She would bite me constantly and never obey me. She’d ignore me telling her to stop chasing the cats and I seriously cried many many nights after she would do something horrible and have zero remorse/shame about it. I was utterly exhausted and frankly, my relationship suffered and so did all my friendships. She NEVER wanted to cuddle as a puppy. She would actively avoid being petted and she would choose to be on the floor instead of the couch next to me.

But she got older. And she calmed down. And now she’s as cuddly as a golden. She follows me around like a shadow and she takes every opportunity to be close to me and get affection. It will get better! There’s a reason we’re all on this forum. We love GSD’s and the bond we have with them.
 

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Also - you said that he seemed fine even just a week ago but is now "more fearful that you thought"?

One question is whether it could be one of the "fear periods" that caused the changes in his behavior.
It says that it happens in late adolescence (anywhere between 6-14 mos, and typically 8-9 mos) and tends to coincide with growth spurts...and tends to last 2-3 weeks.
Just a thought!
 

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I think NILIF would be a good technique to look into. I'm no trainer or expert, but if he is truly snarling at you, and not just play-biting, that's something you need to get under control now, and not just brush off as adolescent behavior. It's great that you have a trainer, but you also need to find the trainer that is the right fit for you, your dog, and the situation. Make sure you have a trainer who is experienced with GSDs and working breeds. If you are fearful, that probably will not help matters, so find someone who can help you feel safe and confident. Could your dog be snapping because he is in pain? Perhaps, a vet visit is in order as well? I agree that if your dog is nipping at people in public (or elsewhere), you need to prevent that. No meet-and-greets for now, and perhaps, crate him when family visits. What did he do to give your step brother a fright?
 

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It can be easy to fall into a habit of always trying to keep them entertained. Always on the go becomes their routine. They start anticipating play, go, play, over and over. Sometimes it takes a little work to teach them to settle down. With a lot of them too, you want to remove grey areas. Think of confusion on his part. Its not clear whats ok in his mind. Don't swing to far the other way as far as correcting him for things, just structure things so that you're comfortable with him and make a routine of it with a focus on down time. In public, use a little distance to let him relax and be a little indifferent to things, not always wondering about this person or that one. The "No one pets my dog" idea is helpful for some of them. Remove that and see how it changes his perception of family over a little time.
 

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My trainer says it's him telling me he is uncomfortable and that I need to respect that.
Get a new trainer. You need to tell your dog NO.

You are in the Detroit area. I think it was suggested to contact a couple of Schutzhund trainers in your area before?

This popped up on my Facebook today. Seems appropriate...

Dog training has gotten kinder, softer, gentler. This is really great, but, maybe it isn't....

Maybe with our kinder, softer gentler training we have forgotten to teach our dogs how to deal with Real Life, and ****ty events that happen whether we want them to or not...

I see many dogs who get whatever they want. If they do not want to do it, they do not have to. And the majority of these dogs are stressed and unhappy and lack the ability to cope in these moments.

Maybe while we are making their first year much more fun, we are denying them the skills to be able to deal with change, and things that they don't like, when they are adults. As puppies they learn the world is a really wonderful place, only to find out as adults that it was all a lie.... Bad stuff WILL happen to them. Dogs will bite them, a person may yell at them, and some procedures at the vet will not be pleasant (just the same for us at the Doctors).

My young dogs are methodically taught to tolerate things that they might not like. They learn that giving, and accepting will make it stop. I start off with minor challenges such as mandatory cuddling - right now I want to cuddle you, and wriggling and writhing are not the solution for it ending. Only relaxing will make it end.

As odd as this sounds, this type of stress training teaches two things: 1) first you must mentally 'give' to me to get what you want, and 2) If there is a stressful moment, think your way through it rather than panicking.

As my dogs have aged through the years, there comes a point where Veterinary Examinations can become unpleasant, awkward and painful. I need my dogs to trust me that I will never do them wrong, I need them to be able to deal with the stress of the moment, and I need them to 'give' to whatever scenario that we present.

Just like children, we owe it to teach them life-skills, and dealing with stress might be the most important one that you can offer. By giving them a perfect puppy hood, you are denying them a perfect adult-hood.

Monique Anstee
Victoria, BC
Naughty Dogge - Monique Anstee | Dog Training and Dog Obedience Victoria BC
 

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Adolescence in many species is hard for the parent/owner/handler. Don't blame yourself, he's being a bit of a butthead just now. But don't back down either. I agree with other posters; get another trainer, once experienced in working breeds.

Don't recall seeing mention of this but do you have a crate and have you crate trained him? Some dogs have to be taught to relax or develop an "off switch." A crate is often the best way to do that. If you go that route, I'd structure 'quiet times,' after return from puppy day care and/or after hard exercise or when you just need a break. ;) He sounds like he may be somewhat overstimulated and, being an adolescent, no idea how to manage it. If so, you have to teach him. You also are going to have to (re)school family and friends; at least until you get past this period. He may no longer be open to attention from strangers. Some dogs aren't and that's okay. But you do have to teach family/friends not to "trap" him in their desire to make friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hi guys,

Thank you everyone for your well thought out replies and your time. I really appreciate it.

I will see if I can answer a few of the questions quick.

Haku is crate trained, but I only use it 3 days of the week when I am at work, or if I need to step out (rare as I guess I just don't sigh...) or if I really need to get something done (usually freelance project) also rare as I feel guilty. I have the thought that well I got myself a Shepherd and I better suck it up and make sure his needs are being met. I struggle to know when I need to force him tor relax or if I need to get up and do something with him again. For the enforced down time I prefer to just baby gate or shut him in the room with me. Depending on how much we have done he is either still restless and pacing and getting into stuff (he finds things to chew) or he is fine and sleeps or chills.

Since his slight lip lifting at me I have been giving him his space. It has been super awkward the last day or so. I realized how much I was touching him because I am constantly having to catch myself now. It sucks. I am a very very physically affectionate person, that is my key way to express love. I guess I will just have to find other ways to express it and recognize it.

I don't think I can find more challenging physical exercise for Haku like Wolfydog suggested. I am burnt out. And with his on and off fear every week it's difficult to know if I can take him somewhere new if it will overwhelm him. On my friends suggestion I have been swapping out some of our ball sessions for training or frozen kongs/ bones/ puzzle toys instead. I feel a lot less stressed mentally, and he is doing okay, but still very restless if he does not actively have something to do. I will see how it goes for a few weeks. My biggest problem days are my 3 days he is crated during work. He obviously is sleeping for 7 hours and so I try do tons when I get home, but it's hard. I am single and live alone and work full time. even after about 3 hours after work ball, training, search games, an outing somewhere, he wont settle.

Because I have been so aware of the touching thing now I have been noticing some things. Someone mentioned it may be worth checking for medical issues. It is very hard as he has been non-stop since his adoption day but if I had to nitpick he does seem a bit itchy? It has sort of crossed my mind a few times. And sometimes when I touch his back or shoulders he sort of flinches. Like the skin slides very obviously. I don't know if this is normal avoidance behavior but to be honest I find it a bit excessive.

I am also concerned that he could be in pain. This has crossed my mind a few times. He has been diagnosed with HD and I actually plan to have one hip replaced around November this year. i have been holding off because he does not limp or show any obvious sings of pain and I am scared to undue all our confidence and socialization work. But could his restlessness be a sign? Even when chewing a bone or trying to relax I often see him flip sides, rearrange himself, lie on his side then lift his head and put it on his paws instead. He will lie down for 3 seconds then get up and go chew his ball. I thought he just has restless energy but if I am wrong I feel bad. He goes all out at daycare though so I thought he can't be in that much pain but maybe I am wrong and he keeps moving to help it? I don't know...

Anyway. I am feeling better today. What helped is he is SO cuddly in the mornings. All on his terms. Nose in my armpit or neck, licks me etc. I am usually in a sleep coma haha I think he is trying to revive me. In every other area he seems super respectful. He waits at doors till release I don't even have to ask. He moves off or out of the way on command. Will leave it and drop stuff. Then last night, I was standing in the kitchen and he ran up and shoved his head between my legs and looks straight at me with the biggest smile I have ever seen. He wanted something, I think a treat lol, so tried out the move we have been working on. Like someone said, my heart melted.

I have always generally practiced NILIF. He never just gets something without sitting, waiting, looking at me , being released etc except affection. That he got freely. Most of my NILIF is environmental, like being released to go outside or greeting someone.

Sorry for the long post I hope I answered some peoples questions and I will keep you updated. Plan for no with back off the cuddling, Step up my authority a little bit but I am hoping no major changes there, no greeting strangers, and telling my family if he comes to them that's fine, but leave him when he doesn't come for attention. They are bad with this. They are all over him and I have told them off a few times.He is adorable so it's hard. I will look around at possible other trainers.

I want our bond stronger. I am going to look into this.
 

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Just don't fall for his training-you techniques. They know how to melt your heart. Lip lifting and giving him space? No way in this house. As long as he does this, he doesn't have respect for you, no matter his good behaviors that will give him what he wants.
 
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