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Has any one here dealt with this- my dog got the diagnosis yesterday- my previous thread had him not eating for three weeks- we went to Tufts Vet School- and after an ultrasound and ACTH stim test he has a cortisol problem.
 

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Wildo's (Willy) dog Pimg has it, and he seems to have done a great job treating her as she is still doing agility and is very active.

PM him if he doesn't see this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you just have a cortisol problem that can be treated with low does of pred but if it is also the mineralcortocoids that is a whole different animal.
 

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mineralcorticoids are dispensed similarly to prednisone, usually in the form of dexamethazone. The differentiation is if it's primary (adrenal based) or secondary (pituitary based) addison's. However, they're both treated similarly and have similar treatment outcomes. With steroids and careful watch during times of physical distress or illness, quality of life isn't impacted too much. I definitely second contacting Willy about it.

I have the human form, and it's identical (and treated identically, more or less) to the dog form :)
 

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We treated our dog with:
Brand Name
Percorten-V (Novartis)
Generic Name
Desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP)
"It has been demonstrated that PERCORTEN-V is well tolerated with a low incidence of side effects."
 

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Yep- Pimg has atypical Addison's. She's on a low (4mg) dose of prednisone daily. Luckily, she has not progressed into full, primary Addison's, so I haven't had to deal with the percorten injections. I do get Pimg's electrolytes checked pretty much any time I see a strange change in behavior- whether she's acting lethargic, or losing weight, or whatever. I was lucky to find a specialist who was able to diagnose and confirm Addison's on our first visit; I had already spent over $3K at other vets trying to get to the bottom of her issues. So I highly trust that vet and her judgment. Definitely finding a vet you trust is super important with an AD dog.

Also- I highly recommend the yahoo group "Addison's Dogs" as there is a real wealth of info there. You'll find out that the dosage that vets tend to prescribe are really high, and through the help of the yahoo group, you'll find the ammunition and info needed to start weaning back the dosages to the lowest possible effective dose. This is SUPER important, as the dog's going to be on meds the rest of their life. Pimg started at 7.5mg/day of prednisone, and while the vets tell me that that is way too low of a dose to be seeing 'roid rage- I'm telling you I saw it. I was happy to see it go away when I reduced her to 5mg/day. I worked her down to 4mg, and experimented with 3.5mg even. I found for my dog that 3.5mg was not enough pred; she would be lacking in energy, constantly panting, rather stressed. Yes- even the smallest change in dose can have a large effect! On the yahoo group, you will find that dogs have lowest effective doses all the way down to as little as .5mg/day (of prednisone). And that's large 100lb Labs even. So really the point is that you'll need to work with your dog and your vet to discover the lowest effective dose.

Pimg lives a pretty normal life with Addison's. In fact, I might even say that she is even better post diagnosis/treatment. AD dogs most definitely CAN live normal lives under proper dosage/treatment. The key really is in tweaking the dosage for your specific dog.


--Oh, thought I'd add that I definitely do up her pred when we go into stressful situations (like the vet, or when neighbors are shooting off tons of fireworks). This is something you definitely need to keep in mind. An AD dog is not able to naturally regulate their stress levels (this is what the glucocorticoids do) and so if they get too stressed they could slip into an Addisonian Crisis. Truth be told, I'm not sure if an atypical Addison's dog could crisis- maybe only primary Addison's dogs could get that level of stress. But I definitely know that it's important to have an extra milligram of pred handy in case stress levels rise quickly.
 
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