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Discussion Starter #1
A vet friend just sent me a message asking me that question (since apparently I am the GSD "expert")

He just received a 5 month old patient and he got impressed of how short her limbs are. His description was a Basset GSD. I sent him information about the pituitary dwarfism of the GSD, but I haven't been able to find references of achondroplasia in the breed.

Has anyone ever heard of such in the German Shepherd Dog?
 

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I have not. Probably a corgi/GSD cross.
 

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Yes I have. My son has achondroplasia and I remember reading a GSD Breed book that talked about achondroplasia in German Shepherds. My son thought it was pretty cool. In humans, the achondroplastic gene is caused by a genetic mutation and is a dominant gene. I found this link on achondroplasia in dogs. Bone Deformity and Dwarfism in Dogs | petMD
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My friend sent me pictures and while it's less extreme than what I thought thet still give me the impression it may be a case of dwarfism.

Thanks for the links! I'm sending them to him.





 

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Very interesting. I have seen and heard if pituitary dwarfism, but never achondroplasia is GSD. There are lots of breeds that are purposely bred for it, bassets, dandies, corgis.

But that dog is not normal. I would love to hear if there are blood or genetic testing to determine what the problem is.
 

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it doesn't look like a pituitary dwarf .

definitely something wrong with this poor dog.

I don't believe the bridge of the muzzle is right either .

wonder if there is some problem with being undershot.

In one of the merck veterinary books (30 years ago) I remember seeing a section which showed dogs (and livestock) with the results of mineral diffeciency , zinc and selenium .
I did a quick read up a few years ago when I was asked to participate in a Raw and Vegan festival and wanted to be prepared to argue against dogs being fed a vegan or vegetarian diet .
Bone deformity like this dogs are possible if they and or especially if their dams had a low meat or poor quality over processed meat diet or a diet high in grains with phytates (unsprouted rice or unrinsed rice) or soy and grains that are the base of cheap dog food -- or vegan or vegetarian dogs.

It would be interesting to see what this dog's diet is , although he/she looks well nourished .
So even more interesting to see would be what his breeder fed the dam before and during pregnancy .
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is what this dog eats. Maybe not to your standards, but one of the best dog foods available in Chile.

JOSERA Junior Premium Dog Food

While I've heard they exist, I've never seen a Corgi in Chile, even less in a town like Valdivia so the possibilities of a cross are slim to none.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm going to investigate about zinc and selenium deficiencies. Selenium is something we studied a lot on vet school because the acidic soils on our region causes the pastures to be deficient on it. I saw myself a couple of calves and a foal who was born with Zenker Disease and finally died and the clinic pictures doesn't seem to fit. Those were muscular dystrophies that looked like deformities, not growing alterations.
 

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I was wondering about the correlation between achondroplasia in humans and dogs. Achondroplasia is the most common form of human dwarfism. It is generally caused by a mutation in the FGFR3 gene. Genetic testing is possible in humans. There is no mutation in the part of the FGFR3 in dogs, that would correspond to humans.

In humans, the mutated gene is dominant. If two affected parents passed the mutated gene to their baby, it would be fatal. Since some breeds of dogs are bred to have short limbs, it is obviously different than with humans. I found this link interesting. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.
 

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This thread really got me thinking....

One of my dogs is blind with double cataracts (inoperable) has an odd structure. He was already blind when we adopted. At the shelter, I recall the young vet doing his exam saying "his legs just don't look right" -- the proportions of the various bones just aren't quite what they ought to be. At first, it's tempting to just "he's just a mix," but that vet didn't think that explained it -- she believed there was some sort of dwarfism going on in him (not pituitary -- something else), but she couldn't identify it.

The Lanting article connects chondroplasia with cataracts, and I had an "aha" moment. Mine is not as extreme as the dog above -- but he does look weirdly short for the size of his torso. Luckily, it doesn't impair him -- he runs, hikes, plays and romps like any dog, and we keep him lean so there's no extra weight on those "shorty" legs. His weird structure adds to his character, which he's got a lot of. Lol

Here he is enjoying swampy scents....I'm trying to find a picture that shows it-- I think as he moves you may be able to see the oddness of his legs:
 

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Catu, Wondering, any updates? Nutritional deficiencies?

Doesn't look like a PD to me either. They retain the wooly puppy coat and this pup's coat looks normal.

Would you have a photo of the pup's face? It has a very typical, fox like look in dogs with PD. GSRNE placed one who lived to be 14 but I can't find photos of Abby on the spot. She had a great temperament and was a much loved family dog in a family with children.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
No updates. These photos were sent to me by a vet friend , I don't know the pup in person.

I'll ask as soon as I see him
 
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