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IMO it is a bad idea. I know a dog who has some serious OCD shadow chasing issues that developed from someone "playing" with a flashlight with him. The problem isn't of the dog not knowing where the light/shadow comes from, it's that such play gets the dog to notice lights/shadows in a way they normally wouldn't have. OCDs aren't caused by the dog not knowing where the light/shadow comes from. It generally starts with something the dog recognizes such as a flashlight or laser light, Most dogs know the sight of these toys when owners use them. The problem comes when the dog then starts noticing light spots or shadows in every day life. Then you have a dog who "plays" with lights spots and shadows in every day life, the same way they "play" with the flashlight.

I'd say a flirt pole is a much better outlet for this sort of play. You can easily make one from a long horse lunge whip and any long, "whippy" toy. It will offer the same sort of chasing exercise without the risk of developing and OCD.
 

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a rag or toy is real, a light dot is not, they cannot feel it or actually catch it. That is where the frustration builds. And yes, they should be able to catch the toy on the pole, play some tug and win it.
I agree they should be able to "win" with the flirt pole. However, if you never let them win, a dog would likely just lose interest in the flirt pole after awhile. Flirt poles are not associated with OCD behaviors. The problem with playing light chasing games IMO is not entirely just that they can't catch the light. At least in part, the problem is that it changes the way the dog's brain reacts to certain stimuli. That is why there is no "safe" laser light or flashlight for your dog to "play" with. It doesn't matter what kind of light or what color the light is, if the dog is willing to chase it you are taking a risk of triggering an OCD behavior. Some dogs can "play" with lights without developing an OCD but a lot of them can not and there's no way to predict which your dog is until it's too late.
 

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Heagler has your trainer referred you to a veterinarian for behavioral medication? Very often, that is what is needed to help modify OCD behavior.

This video shows a dog with shadow chasing OCD the description says "Our border collie won't stop looking at shadows. She spends her whole day doing this, while other animals and people just walk around her." It is hard for people who have never seen a dog with this problem to understand what it means for a dog to have a light/shadow chasing OCD. It really changes how the dog acts in every day life.

 
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