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Lola was attacked by a (hate to say it) APBT (maybe a mix, horrible owners) about a month and a half ago. We make sure that we get her around a lot of dogs and people, but I've noticed that she is still weary of most dogs (doesn't matter if they are larger or smaller than she is). The confusing part is, at puppy class yesterday, a couple of people had GSDs walking around the store, and brought them up to meet her, and she was fine, like they were best friends (to all the GSDs that were there), but then a little pug comes up from class, and she is cowering behind my legs again. Any ideas to this behavior? (FYI: these were the first GSDs that she has seen since she was 8 1/2 weeks old)
 

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Just keep socializing her and don't comfort her when she acts fearful. Redirect her to a toy or a treat and go on with what you were doing.
A couple of my dogs are reactive to the fluffy herding types, because our next door neighbor has a sheltie that barks and runs constantly. My dogs want to get at him in the worst way, so when they see dogs of those type breeds they act the same way.

The pug has a simular structure to the bully breeds(even though much smaller), maybe your pup is relating that to her attack.
 

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I'm with onyx'girl, just keep exposing her to good pups in good meetings.

How YOU react is really important. Don't just quietly let the greeting take place. And do NOT reassure and baby her.

Instead, I make sure the oncoming pup/dog is friendly by looking at it's body language AND asking 'Is your dog friendly'. If I don't IMMEDIATELY get a 'yes my dog is (any hesitation means there may be an issue) I happily and joyously with a high and excited voice get my puppies attention and we go the other direction.

Not that I am telling her the other dog is mean and scary. I am JUST telling her I love her and we are going this way. We should NOT have had any interaction (good or bad) with the other dog.

If the other dog IS GOOD, I do the same thing. Not leaving the greeting 100% up to the puppy but instead I greet the human at the end of the leash and the new dog with my high happy what a great day what a great puppy voice. So I AM leading and showing it's ok. I AM in control. My puppy is learning to take the lead from me and I say it's a-ok.

I always take tons of treats when I go out and about and think there may be socialization opportunities. Cause then I can also add real yummy treats to the situation (I'm talking soft cheese, chicken, pizza, beef, hotdogs, etc). And I can hand them to the other person for BOTH dogs. Give them out myself (make sure it's ok with the other person to treat their dog). Run them thru easy 'tricks' like 'sit/down' or just have them look adoringly up for the treat.

If you aren't sure of dog body language (and none of us are until we get tons of experience) I really recommend purchasing the DVD Calming Signals by Turid Rugaas. Amazing what's going on with dog/dog communication that we 'stupid' humans are missing. [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Calming-Signals-What-Your-Tells/dp/B000PGTF32/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1276608021&sr=8-1[/ame]
 

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Running with MaggieRoseLee's response, makes you have to think how YOU were responding to the greeting with the GSD folks. I know when I meet and greet someone who has a GSD, there is sorta a kin-ship feeling. So my body language is one of excitement and eagerness. We are fellow GSD owners! And normally the conversation between the owners is light and cheery.

But when I greet another breed, and most certainly a smaller yappy-er breed, there is hesitation with in me. I try not to let it happen, but it does. And then handler of the smaller dog is concerned that my dog may eat their dog, therefore they are a little stand offish. Or their dog seriously invades my dogs space and is full of rolly polly happiness, something Hondo just doesn't seem to appreciate. So the meeting isn't as open and cheerful.
 

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Mine was attacked when he was barely a year old. We are still (year and a half later) dealing with the issues that were caused as a result. What I can tell you that I personally have learned, is this: first, it is very true that your reaction and feelings have a significant impact on the dog's response. Remain calm and in control, even if your dog is not. In addition, I have found you must become very familiar with all of your dogs verbal and non verbal communication. When I walk and I see a dog coming, my attention goes directly to Dexter, the moment I see ANY reaction, distraction and/or correction. You can still watch the oncoming dog with peripheral vision while watching your dog. This "little" thing is what prevented many over reactions and if there was one, I was able to catch it before he went full out. Once I was able to do this, training became much more responsive when we were working desensitization and socialization.

Good luck....so you know, these things can take months, years or even the life of a dog to manage. Try not to get too frustrated. Learn to understand your dogs response and body language and IMO, that's half the battle. You will begin to notice what qualities in dogs are more likely to cause a response in your dog. Mine hates unbalanced, unleashed and socially inept dogs....but who doesn't I guess!lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Do you mean to say wary? Weary means she's tired. :)
Sorry, did not catch that. Yes, I did mean wary (must have been in a bigger hurry than I thought for work this morning, or maybe I was just that tired! :laugh: ). Thank y'all for all the advice, I do have to admit that I am nervous when walking her because we have yet to meet another dog that isn't trying to get at us (not playfully, but with lots of growling and barking, with the owner looking terrified that they ran into somebody on their walk). Lola does have a few dogs that she has play-dates with that go great, I just want lots and lots of good encounters for her (and I do need to work on my reactions too).
 
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