German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am putting this in the puppy section because my one year old rescue acts like he is a 4 month old pup.
The issues i am having, is of course recall. Now this dog was a stray and is horrible at comeing back. He refuses. So we have been working on this on the long line.
But my main issue with him is when i try and correct his bad behavior be trys to bite me and he screams. (sometimes urinating)
I do not know how to correct his behavior and it gets me frustrated.
He never lays down, he pases my room constently. He is not a very good house dog.
But he is perfect on the leash on walks. PERFECT!!
He hates his hawks being touched, and his back. He wont let me brush him, he bites and screams at me for it.
Really need advice on how to corrct a dog like this and how to get him okay with touch and brushing!!
Thanks so much!
And by the way, he is submissive and doesnt do well with harsh corrections due to his formor owner, (hit him, threw things at him, ect)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
I am subscribing to this thread would like to see responses, I cannot offer any help but I am sure these are some questions you are going to be asked:

1. How long have you had him?
2. Did you do NILIF or 2 Week shut down program?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
938 Posts
How long have you had this dog?

Two-week shutdown might definitely help. Also what Leerburg calls "groundwork." The pacing, biting, and screaming sounds like he is not comfortable in his home at all and needs some serious management/structure to feel safe.

http://www.leerburg.com/podcasts/groundworkpart1.mp3

To me it sounds like he needs a better routine and desensitization, not more corrections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
From everything that you have described, the LAST thing that this dog needs are more corrections. It sounds as though he needs time, patience and lots of positive reinforcement. You might want to investigate reward/food/treat-based training methods with this dog. He sounds terrified and corrections are not going to help him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
A week, i know that he is new and it will take time for him to settle in, i just want to make sure i am doing it RIGHT. This dog is so sensitive, i dont want to do ANYTHING wrong! I havent corrected him yet, what i normally do is i will make a "ah!" noise and or walk away, i try and reposition his feet when he jumps on me. And i ignore the behavior because i am trying to get him to settle in. He gets plenty of exersize, and eats twice a day, plenty of water, potty breaks, and bone time. He is such a snoop around my room, sniffs out everything.
I really want this dog to bond with me so we trust each other and he can have the freedom off leash and in my bedroom, etc. He is such a good pup. I just dont know what excatly to do with him.
It is hard for me to let him have his off time when i cant trust him off leash..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,941 Posts
Have treats on you and start training. Something as simple as saying his name, and he looks at you, he gets a treat! Use the treats in you hands to lure him into a sit or any other position you want and reward him with a treat. He is very lost and confused, and the more low-key, no-nonsense structure you can give him, the better for him. If he won't settle and paces all the time, crate him more, or keep him baby-gated in one room.

I've adopted a dog like this. I think Keeta was a tied dog all her life, growled and snapped if I tried to touch her tail or her feet (doing nails was so much fun!). Had no concept on HOW to relate to a person. She is not submissive, so it was a battle of wills. It was exhausting. Until I got us into a class and my goodness! It changed everything around. Instead of always being in conflict and struggling for control, we were working together as a team, and she began to look to me for direction. Something in her head just clicked, and she changed. Took about six months though, so patience is key. But I bet your new rescue has all the potential to be a good dog, just needs to learn to trust and to have confidence in himself.

Manage his environment so he does not get a chance to 'be bad', or misbehave. When he comes up to you and you see he is about to jump, pull out a treat and have him sit. Pretty soon he will be sitting for you automatically. Key is to anticipate his behaviour, and redirect it to something more acceptable before he makes the wrong decision. By setting up positive outcomes by controlling and anticipating his behaviour, you will create a positive and rewarding base for interaction with you, and that is where the bond will come from.

Yes, it is a LOT of work! (Ask me all about it!), but the effort you put in this dog now is going to pay of a hundred-fold down the line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
If you have only had this dog for a week, it is way to soon for him to be outdoors off leash without a fenced yard. If he is peeing, he is scared, ignore it. A good trainer could help you a lot but you will need a lot of positive with him. Give yourself and the dog time to get to know each other. Does he have a crate to spend time in to rest? I would have it in your room at night. He has been through a lot and that is why he seems younger. My rescue took longer than I thought she would to settle in too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,318 Posts
From everything that you have described, the LAST thing that this dog needs are more corrections. It sounds as though he needs time, patience and lots of positive reinforcement. You might want to investigate reward/food/treat-based training methods with this dog. He sounds terrified and corrections are not going to help him.
I think my trainer would agree with above.
I am not a professional, but someone had almost the same question in our OBedience training class and our trainer stated the same as above. Positive reward training. Treat treat treat while brushing or touching him. Start with small touches and expand to the whole dog while treating. She said she only uses corrections for behavior such as chasing cars etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,802 Posts
The goal with this sort of dog should be to avoid the dog ever being in a situation where a correction is needed. Set the dog up constantly for small successes - and treat and praise. This requires being thoughtful about your interactions and how you set up your day, but in a few weeks, you'll see a big change in the dog's self-esteem this way.

For example, with a shy new foster, if the dog isn't crated, I prefer for it to be on a leash in the house next to me. That might last a few weeks, depending on the dog. It's never in a position to get into mischief, so no corrections are required. It simply can't get into trouble right next to me. When it lies down next to me, I praise and treat. When it gets up to follow me when I get up, praise and treat....etc. I really, really, really want to avoid needing corrections with psychologically damaged foster dogs fresh from the shelter--so I work hard to keep them doing the right thing. I find this builds their trust very quickly too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,649 Posts
Yes, you need to take a deep breath and then start over with this dog. Throw the whole correction idea out the window and start thinking creatively. Set him up for success by making everything into a fun game. You want him to trust you so make everything fun, low pressure and lots of rewards at first.

You are right to think of him as a puppy--it sounds like he hasn't had the greatest life and now it's your opportunity to show him that you are a fair, kind and consistent leader! Have fun with him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Im not frustrate or mad at the dog, and i havent corrected him or anything. I just wanted to go about this inm the right way. He is sensitive in some areas and i just want to figure what way is BEST to work with him. He is already bonding with me. I let him out in the back yard the other day and he was doing good, was checkin in and being awesome. He is very good on walks, even through the dog park.
I gave him a bath the other day with my dad holding onto his leash, and he didnt whine or bark or freak out barley at all, then we blow dried him and he was still amazing! I was shocked. He is doing really good. Another thing i have noticed, when i put him in the kennel he is silent and perfect. But when i let him out, he passes sniffs everywhere and whines. And if i tie him up to my bed under my feet he whines and barks. Why would he bark when being out of the kennel?
I do not mind starting over or taking it slow, i am not frustrated at all, its a learning experience for us both! I just dont want to do anything wrong!
His past owners werent the nicest to him and he is pretty nervous when he thinks he will get corrected. The corrected him A LOT. Yelling, hitting, objects thrown at him.
They told me how bad of a dog he was.
Honestly this dog is NO WHERE near a bad dog. He is an AMAZING dog. And has an extreme amount of potential!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Guys this dog is amazing. I took him to the dog park today and i took a leap of faith and let him off (very little secure park, only a few dogs) and he was INCREDIBLE. He cam back every so minutes to check up! And then when i would call him he would come back each time!! Im so proud i could cry!!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top