German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, first time GSD owner here but I have a Maltese dog that’s already 9 years old. This is gonna be a little long, but bear with me, because I need help lol.

Now I have problems with my GSD, where she likes to jump up on my older dog and put her paw (her nails can be really sharp) on his face, and often tries to nip and bite at his face and tail. It kinda seems playful where she does this and chases him, but my older dog doesn’t like this (probably because he’s older) and tries to run away but she just chases him. I know GSD display dominant behavior, that’s why I kinda turn a blind eye toward some of it, like my puppy always trying to steal treats from my other dog and always trying to eat out of his bowl instead (my dog now just waits for her to finish eating before he starts, as it doesn’t matter which bowl my GSD is eating from, if my other dog goes to another bowl, she’ll just switch and if he goes to the other bowl again, she’ll want to go back to that bowl).

I also have problems with my GSD biting at me, which are usually jus little nips which I know is normal for teething dogs, but she sometimes bites hard and serious, usually when I try to stop her from chasing and biting my other dog.

I’m really worried about my puppy. When I try to punish her for biting me (and my other dog) by not playing with her and putting her back in the basement (which is where their crates and beds and toys are, it’s where they usually stay), my GSD whines and starts howling. But this isn’t even about punishing her, when I leave her alone there after playing with her (no matter how long I played with her), she sits at the bottom of the stairs and starts whining as if she doesn’t want to be separated from me.

I’m not sure exactly how to handle a GSD, as it is different from other dogs. I don’t want to be too rough with her, like the Breeder I got her from said to swat her with a rolled up newspaper on her nose when she bites the other dog, but I don’t want to do this. She seems fragile and sad and I don’t want to be too rough on her, but I don’t know if I’m being to kind either. Any thoughts from more experienced GSD owners?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
How old is your puppy? Can you separate them more without isolating the puppy? They like being near us. I used two crates for my young dog as a puppy. One in the bedroom for sleeping, the other right in the middle of the action for separation and quiet time. They learn when we walk in and out of the room that we will always return. Ignore whining. Don’t talk or look at them or react in any way unless the puppy is quiet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Shes 9 weeks old and has her own crate that I can lock her in so I can seperate them yes but what I’m worried about is her growing up and still biting. One bite from her when she grows up could probably kill my little Maltese lol, so I’m not sure if separating them is a good idea. I try to make them get along but I think my other dog is also not so happy about the GSD being here, he wants more attention than usual and they both fight for my attention. In fact she only bites my other dog whenever I’m petting him or we’re outside together
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
What works for us...

I have the crates in my kitchen because it gets the most traffic and I think that helps. I learned to tell the difference between whining about crating and the "I HAVE TO PEE/POO IMMEDIATELY, LADY" squeal through trial and experience, although the second one sounds like a singular brand of desperate/not joking. I ignore everything else.

About the feeding issue, I feed three dogs at once in separate spots, then I stand in the middle of the kitchen and correct them like a referee if they try to dish hop. It took about a month to get our puppy to understand that his spot was it, but I'm still in there watching them so there's no backsliding. Dishes go down, they eat and drink, dishes come up, and it's worth the handful of minutes it takes. We also hand feed a few times a week and switch their bowls.

I kept our puppy on a leash when out of the crate and controlled the playing with our older dog. I got a Hilti training leash that has a clip open handle so I could slip it through a belt loop. I did that constantly for the first month we had him, and would put him back on the minute he started acting like a boob...he's pretty chill now at 18 weeks in comparison to the 8 week old puppy shark that he was. Can't remember where I read the tether tip, and it was a pain in the tuckas to be honest, but it's supposed to get the dog in a rhythm with you and help with bonding.

We also make a verbal click noise to get their attention (sort of like clicker training, and it earned them treats) and now all three will be at my feet when I make that noise--which beats saying three names.

ETA: Someone told me to always acknowledge the oldest dog first to help solidify the social order. So my adult dog gets first greeting, first pets, first treats, everything. The other two have become much more patient and I think it's the consistency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,943 Posts
No, don't swat the pup on the nose. We brought home GSD pups home twice when we had an older Yorkie in the house. We allowed the Yorkie couch privileges but never the puppies. It gave her a safe place of refuge. We fed them in separate areas, maybe a baby gate would help so they can be fed in different areas. As the pups matured they could spend time together without the Yorkie getting roughed up, but until then it was a lot of monitoring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,335 Posts
It seems to me that there are some behaviors you're allowing that should be stopped immediately. I do not let any dog push and bully my other dogs. That means, other dog is getting a treat, you are absolutely not allowed to try to take it. No toy stealing. No trying to eat out of each other's bowls. No shoving each other out of the way when the other dog is being pet. Etc.

Just because GSDs have a more dominant temperament DOES NOT mean they get a pass for bad manners. I agree with you. This needs to be stopped now, before your puppy is big enough to seriously injure your maltese.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
She is 9 weeks old jeeeez!! And it is so so so easy to tire a puppy out at 9 weeks haha if you think its hard now .. just wait until 4-5 months!
When pup bites you redirect with a toy (do not just toss a toy and turn around) shake the toy, tease her with it to get her excited and then toss it. This should get her to redirect. Have lots of toys around so you can keep doing this! If you do this and they keep biting after 3 or so attempts at REALLY trying to re direct..then the puppy is tired & cranky and NEEDS A NAP - Put the puppy in the crate (not loose in the basement), shut the door...she will probably pass out within a couple of minutes!
GOOD LUCK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Woah, lots of replies real quick. Thanks for all the answers guys. And I do try to stop my GSD from dominating my Maltese, in fact I have to watch them whenever they eat to make sure they eat out of their own bowls. My Maltese too I think is trying to establish that he was here first by trying to eat out of my GSD bowl and she does the same, it’s a little frustrating because my GSD won’t let him eat and my Maltese won’t let her eat and they keep switching bowls. I stop them but my GSD is pretty adamant on dominating and will knock things over and try to climb over my hands just to get a single bite out of my Maltese’s bowl. It’s pretty tough, how long do you think this will last?

And as for the biting, I already do replace human flesh with toys right away, and the same whenever she bites my Maltese. But she still pounces on him and chases him sometimes for no reason and he just runs, I stop this behavior whenever I see it but I see no improvement. In fact now that my Maltese has started resisting and growling at her when she does this, my GSD has started barking repeatedly at my Maltese. The barking can be random too sometimes when I’m petting my Maltese as if she wants my attention instead.

How exactly do I correct this behavior? It’s obvious she doesn’t like my Maltese getting more attention, and will bite him or chase him or just straight out walk into him to take his place when I’m petting him. I say no and turn my attention to my Maltese but she just starts jumping up on me and sometimes barks or chases my Maltese. Phew, GSDs sure do take up lots of time haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,025 Posts
I think it's best to get a good trainer to your home to work with you and the dogs. Keep the Maltese separate from your pup, maybe permanently. By taking her to the basement is useless as punishment; by the time you are there, she won't have a clue why and won't make the connection with the "crime". Consequences need to be within two seconds or else you are punishing her for the behavior at that very time.
You are in for a lot of work so please get the help you need. Here we can only do so much. If you decided that it is too much for you, please do not wait too long in finding her a new home or return to the breeder? I am sure we all have bitten off more than we could chew at one time. I did. Also keep an eye on the quality of life of your older dog. I have dealt with that same issue years ago. Keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
Feed them in separate rooms or put the puppy in her crate and feed her there - don't let this become a fight over food.

Make sure your puppy is getting enough exercise, you've played with her and she is tired. It is pretty easy to keep a 9 week old puppy tired. A tired puppy is a good puppy.

Get some baby gates around the house - keep the Maltese and the puppy separate. Your Maltese doesn't deserve to be tormented like this in her later years.

Get a trainer to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,335 Posts
The others have given you good advice. I agree wholeheartedly about keeping them separate, at least for a while. Maybe when the puppy is older and better able to control herself they can be together again. I know you probably don't want to have to keep them apart, it isn't much fun and it's extra work, but it is important for the wellbeing of your maltese. This could get ugly real fast, even if the puppy is just trying to play. Imagine how a real fight would go down if the maltese got sick of dealing with the shepherd stealing his food.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
So just to keep you guys updated I’ve separated them at feeding and my Maltese now surprisingly eats a lot more, my poor boy was probably not eating as much as he should this past week:(. But as for my German sheperd I also find it easier to teach her to obey me without a distraction (my other dog) around for her to chase, and I think I’ll take the advice you guys have given to try and seperate them more often now. Like you said, my GSD will learn when she gets older, and she’s teething now anyway, so it must be difficult for her already without having to try not to chew on my other dog lol. So far I think it looks good, but I’ll be sure to let you guys know how things go!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I would definitely keep them apart unless they're being closely watched,the adult Maltese could easily hurt such a tiny pup,give it a couple of months and the shepherd could easily kill the Maltese.

A little old dog will look like a very attractive plaything to your pup for a long time, I keep mine outside so I just keep them apart aside from the occasional short on-lead walk together,until i can control and trust the pup.
Even then I only walk them together,they're never together unsupervised.

That can,and very often does lead to disaster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,497 Posts
When we brought out gsds pups - they would often try to play with our chihuahua who wanted nothing to do with either of them. The chihuahua had a crate where he could go for privacy and feel safe. When we had our pup out everything was structured and know teasing and tormenting allowed. Long leash with a flat collar attatched also helps learn the rules of the house. The leave it command came in very handy. EventuLly our chihuahua warmed up. Still interactions are watched but they know how to interact with each other and the gsds know are little guy is very important. A lot of patience with the puppy biting is needed and constant redirection. Now the gsds are adults they let me known if our chihuahua slips under the space under the fence and also keep the hawks and foxes away.
https://youtu.be/asVQYYSWPJc
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKjk84OkzcI
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top