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Thecowboysgirl's suggestion " call him when he will be 100% successful. Don't call him when he is distracted or farther away than he can succeed."...IMO this is the way to go...."success breeds success"



One other thought.....with my current dog......I paired a visual/physical cue with most every verbal command/cue......always using both in the beginning.....eventually the verbal commands were mostly phased out and we communicated via my body/arms/legs/hands/head nods/ facial gestures etc. I believe by doing this it made it much easier for the dog to give me her focus awaiting the physical cue since they have to be looking at you.


At 9 weeks old however.....I think I just primarily focused on being the most entertaining creature my pup had to play with and explore with......lots of fun and bonding.




SuperG
Hey can you provide suggestions on how to learn/teach the physical cues you use or resources to where I can learn those ??? I would love to do this.
 

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Hey can you provide suggestions on how to learn/teach the physical cues you use or resources to where I can learn those ??? I would love to do this.

I think it's pretty straight forward as I mentioned previously......just pairing a physical cue with a verbal command as the dog learns the desired behavior.

I'm guessing the first few items most teach their dogs are basic positions such as sit, down and stand etc.... I chose to use a fist, flat hand and a side hand with motion for those three basic commands paired with the corresponding verbal cues. After a short bit of time....the dog will respond to the physical cue sans the verbal cue. GSDs seem to be very visually oriented and pick up on our physical nuances.....so it's fairly easy.

Most of the visual cues I use are fairly subtle except for a come front because long distances can be involved....so I chose to raise my right arm straight up over my head.

Pick whatever visual cues you want ....just as you would any verbal cues. Obviously, consistency is very important.

I'm sure others have good advice if not better regarding how to teach physical cues.

Have fun with the process and when your dog nails the physical cue without the verbal cue.....a good round of praise/reward would be appropriate.


SuperG
 

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Thecowboysgirl's suggestion " call him when he will be 100% successful. Don't call him when he is distracted or farther away than he can succeed."...IMO this is the way to go...."success breeds success"



One other thought.....with my current dog......I paired a visual/physical cue with most every verbal command/cue......always using both in the beginning.....eventually the verbal commands were mostly phased out and we communicated via my body/arms/legs/hands/head nods/ facial gestures etc. I believe by doing this it made it much easier for the dog to give me her focus awaiting the physical cue since they have to be looking at you.


At 9 weeks old however.....I think I just primarily focused on being the most entertaining creature my pup had to play with and explore with......lots of fun and bonding.




SuperG
Could you possibly explain/provide information on training using physical cues or resources for that? I’d love to do this with mine.
 

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I think it's pretty straight forward as I mentioned previously......just pairing a physical cue with a verbal command as the dog learns the desired behavior.

I'm guessing the first few items most teach their dogs are basic positions such as sit, down and stand etc.... I chose to use a fist, flat hand and a side hand with motion for those three basic commands paired with the corresponding verbal cues. After a short bit of time....the dog will respond to the physical cue sans the verbal cue. GSDs seem to be very visually oriented and pick up on our physical nuances.....so it's fairly easy.

Most of the visual cues I use are fairly subtle except for a come front because long distances can be involved....so I chose to raise my right arm straight up over my head.

Pick whatever visual cues you want ....just as you would any verbal cues. Obviously, consistency is very important.

I'm sure others have good advice if not better regarding how to teach physical cues.

Have fun with the process and when your dog nails the physical cue without the verbal cue.....a good round of praise/reward would be appropriate.


SuperG
Thank you!!! And sorry I didn’t think my first post asking you actually posted and asked you again. I apologize for that!
 

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I use a faded version of whatever lure motion I initially used to train a behavior as the hand signal. An example of fading would be teaching a "down", where I start by bringing my hand, palm down with a small treat in it, all the way to the floor. When the pup follows my hand and drops into a down I mark it ("yes!" or with a clicker) and deliver the treat. From there I use the same motion but without a treat lure so the puppy is following an empty hand and getting rewarded with a treat from my other hand. I don't want to lure for too long, so I transition to an empty hand as quickly as I can. Gradually, that big sweeping motion of my hand will become a simple finger point at the floor. For sit, I use my hand, palm up with a treat, drawing it from right above the puppy's head backwards towards his rear, so if he's following it with his eyes, he will naturally sit. Mark, treat. I fade that out to a quick flick up with my first two fingers.

To add a verbal cue, you'd use it a second or two before you use the hand motion. Because dogs pay a lot of attention to our body language and quickly learn to tune out most of our verbiage as irrelevant to them, you want to give him time for the word to register. It will then become associated with the behavior he's already learned. Don't rush this process. Gradually, you can wait a bit longer between the verbal cue and the hand motion, using the latter as a reminder as necessary. Don't be afraid to wait him out a bit, he'll get it. And once he does, the first time he does the behavior on a verbal cue alone, big party - lots of enthusiastic praise and several treats delivered in rapid order. He may not do it again right away but at this point you know he's figuring it out.

If you have a dog who already knows a verbal cue and you want to add a hand signal, reverse it. Use the hand signal a second or two before the word. What you do first, which he doesn't know yet, will then become a predictor for what follows, which he does know. With one of our dogs years ago, Cassidy, I had trained a sit and down but she learned one with the hand signal and didn't understand the verbal cue, and the other she learned with the verbal cue and didn't understand the hand signal. Clearly, I wasn't very good at this stuff at that point, lol. So for one, I used the verbal cue before the hand signal, the other I used the hand signal before the verbal cue.

What hand signals you decide to use aren't important, you can pick whatever makes sense to you.
 

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Never give them a chance to blow you off. That is teaching them that it is an option to come to you.
Now you will have to unteach it.
Have a drag line on him, and make him follow through, every time. If there is a chance he won’t listen, don’t call him.
This is a life skill that is very important, can mean life or death. It should be one of the first, if not THE first, to teach.
You have a lot of work to do.
I would just want to add to the OP that the attention span of a 9 week old is very short; frequent but short training episodes like the one described here are better than longer sessions. Keep it friendly, fun, short. Then repeat later in a different setting.
 
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