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What is a good age to go off leash ..She works well off leash in the back fenced area Responds well to commands But still gets off on distractions
 

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It depends on the dog. My current month was very dependable at 4 months. That doesn't mean I would walk him near a busy street at that age, but in a park would come 100% of the time with distractions on a long line. Then off leash.
I have had other dogs (other breeds) that were far too interested in other dogs and people to be dependable at such a young age.
 

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It depends on the dog. My current month was very dependable at 4 months. That doesn't mean I would walk him near a busy street at that age, but in a park would come 100% of the time with distractions on a long line. Then off leash.
I have had other dogs (other breeds) that were far too interested in other dogs and people to be dependable at such a young age.
Yes has other dog distractions ...Very smart with all the commands .. Just what to be able to hang out with her off leash
 

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My dogs have always spent more of their lives off leash than on. But if yours hasn't, I'd suggest continuing to work him off leash in a fenced area, so he's off leash but still contained.

It is always a risk. But you want to mitigate the risk as much as possible with training!
 

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My dogs have always spent more of their lives off leash than on. But if yours hasn't, I'd suggest continuing to work him off leash in a fenced area, so he's off leash but still contained.

It is always a risk. But you want to mitigate the risk as much as possible with training!
She off 90 % of time and does well in a fenced environment. Ready when we walk out with out running off . Haven’t really let out much since I live in a subdivision
Not to be a jerk, but it's spelled shepherd. Sorry, pet peeve of mine.
sorry my bad
 

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She off 90 % of time and does well in a fenced environment. Ready when we walk out with out running off . Haven’t really let out much since I live in a subdivision
Yeah, I wasn't referring to your backyard necessarily. Or anything quite that small! If you can find areas that are fenced but larger, like by me there are a couple of off leash areas by lakes. Sometimes schools have decent sized fenced areas too.

It is good to test your dog's reliability off leash without risking them getting hit by a car or running into some other malady.

The main thing is that the area is large, and it's new and exciting to your dog. It's a good test, and it will show you what obedience things might need a bit more work!

For my dog, it was deer. She'd never seen one up close until she was an adult over 2 yrs. But she blew my recall off in favor of the chase! And of course, chased the deer out and across a road (no traffic, fortunately!), then stopped when the deer hopped over a metal stock gate.
Had that stock gate not been there, I have no idea how far she would have gone!

Like I said, there's always risk! Just test, train, then test some more. No way to really ever be 100% sure, unless you've actively tested your dog in every possible scenario.

But stack the deck in your favor by testing him in a variety of low risk areas. Good Luck!
 

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I don’t understand the fascination with off leash especially in an urban area. I guess in a rural area it’s a little different.


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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, I wasn't referring to your backyard necessarily. Or anything quite that small! If you can find areas that are fenced but larger, like by me there are a couple of off leash areas by lakes. Sometimes schools have decent sized fenced areas too.

It is good to test your dog's reliability off leash without risking them getting hit by a car or running into some other malady.

The main thing is that the area is large, and it's new and exciting to your dog. It's a good test, and it will show you what obedience things might need a bit more work!

For my dog, it was deer. She'd never seen one up close until she was an adult over 2 yrs. But she blew my recall off in favor of the chase! And of course, chased the deer out and across a road (no traffic, fortunately!), then stopped when the deer hopped over a metal stock gate.
Had that stock gate not been there, I have no idea how far she would have gone!

Like I said, there's always risk! Just test, train, then test some more. No way to really ever be 100% sure, unless you've actively tested your dog in every possible scenario.

But stack the deck in your favor by testing him in a variety of low risk areas. Good Luck!
Thank. Great information
 

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I don’t understand the fascination with off leash especially in an urban area. I guess in a rural area it’s a little different.


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It's not a fascination, it's so much better exercise for the dog! You spend an hour walking your dog each day, and they are not exercised at all really. But spend a half hour wandering around or playing fetch and your dog is ready for some rest!
 

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It's not a fascination, it's so much better exercise for the dog! You spend an hour walking your dog each day, and they are not exercised at all really. But spend a half hour wandering around or playing fetch and your dog is ready for some rest!
I agree, however the OP did mention just wanting to “hang out” with their dog off leash - to which (depending on what the OP meant and where they live) I understand @Nscullin ’s point / interpretation. I live / work in a dense urban area and almost always have a dog with me... I’m constantly approached by off leash dogs. Not strays, not anywhere near parks, not anywhere near homes, just... hanging out in plazas and shopping districts, walking downtown etc. it’s certainly “a thing” here. If 100% of them were calm, well behaved, neutral and stayed by their owners that’d be different... but many aren’t. Some people even walk their dog in a loose heel position with a leash in their hand. Again, if their dog stayed there, there wouldn’t be a problem, but because of the ones who don’t, I now have to quickly size up the dog and owner, assess the situation and either prepare myself should I decide to proceed or go out of my way to cross the street etc. when I’m working, I don’t generally have that option.
 
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