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So we have an 8 week old pup which we brought home at 6 weeks. In the last week she has become less affectionate it seems. All she wants to do is bite us and get into things. When we move her away and tell her no (after multiple times) she will bark at us multiple times and eventually lay down.

I try to pet her and all she wants to do is bite. I try to hold her and she wiggles and whines until I put her down. It's been 10 years since I have had to raise a GS pup, so I can't remember if this is normal. I feel like my pup doesn't like me. Anyone else have this problem? Will she eventually come around?
 

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It's a GSD puppy not a toy lap dog,lol Thats perfectly normal behavior- she wants to play which is affection. Start stuffing a toy in her mouth when she is nippy and playing tug, teach her fetch, and get her out for some fun running around in the grass. Puppies have a ton of energy and need a lot of physical and mental stimulation- the less they get the more nippy and destructive they are. Puppy proof the house, crate her when you can't watch her, invest in some good soup bones and bully sticks for chewing, and rev up the play. It builds the bond and makes for a better behaved pup:)
 

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sounds like your pup is starting to feel comfortable in it's new house and with it's new family. Strap yourself in, it's gonna be a heck of a ride.:)
 

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I hope Jason doesn't mind.. but I have to post this on his behalf.

His puppy Ike... from this:

YouTube - oberdot's Channel

To this:

YouTube - oberdot's Channel


Training, socializing, training, PATIENCE.... it will get better. :)
I just wanted to add to this post..

To get to this point (video B) it takes, time, dedication, training (yourself included) and passion.. I just wanted to to say that it is capable to have a silly, crazy, bitey puppy and bring him up to be an amazing dog - it all depends on YOU the owner. Jason has done an amazing job with Ike (and his other two dogs) and I think the time and energy spent with Ike shows in the results. Food for thought. :)
 

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This is very NORMAL puppy behavior! Patience is the key...and LOTS OF EXERCISE. Your puppy is trying to push your buttons and test your leadership skills. Just be consistant with everything and it will all pay off. Good Luck
 

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This is very NORMAL puppy behavior! Patience is the key...and LOTS OF EXERCISE. Your puppy is trying to push your buttons and test your leadership skills. Just be consistant with everything and it will all pay off. Good Luck
The puppy isn't trying to do anything.. it's a puppy. He's a baby who is learning about his environment, what is acceptable and what is not is YOUR job to show him.

Keep it light, fun and when you can't then crate him until YOU can come back to the situation calm, happy and ready to go again.
 

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Your puppy is trying to push your buttons and test your leadership skills. Just be consistant with everything and it will all pay off. Good Luck
Agree with Elizabeth that the puppy is just being a very typical german shepherd puppy...aka alligator, LOL. Puppies don't deliberately act in ways to annoy or challenge you--they have no dominance agenda or anything like that. They just want to play! She interprets you pushing her away as a game.

I would work on redirecting her to toys she can play with. When my puppies go through this stage I just keep putting a toy in their mouth and then play with them with the toy. Eventually they understand that when they're feeling feisty they should get a toy instead of biting me!
 

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very true about the pushing away being interpreted by the pup as "let's PLAY". Our little shark was extreme in this as a pup and still is at 3 yo. He doesn't interpret most any physical corrction as punishment - more like "let's go!".
 

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very true about the pushing away being interpreted by the pup as "let's PLAY". Our little shark was extreme in this as a pup and still is at 3 yo. He doesn't interpret most any physical corrction as punishment - more like "let's go!".
Stark as well.. This is actually my reward system. He's not food or toy motivated but after MONTHS and MONTHS (actually almost a whole year) of trying different things I've come to realize he thrives on physcial engagement, we heel, I release and then I push him, tag him, he jumps up, mouths my arm, jumps on me, I push him back, rough house him a bit, back into heel position, some nice sits/platz, heel and release back into play! :)

I seriously think if someone were to push him away, he'd jump back at them and be like, "sweet! Let's play!" Hahaha.
 

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@Zoeys mom - I understand it's not a lap dog, I trained a GSD in the past. I just don't remember the last dog being like this. I remember her playing, but I believe she allowed me to at least pet her. The new pup wants to nip nearly every time I touch her.

All. Thanks for the feedback. We currently are doing everything you suggest, I posted hoping to hear the posative stories and suggestions. The down side is it's winter here in Wisconsin, so our pup doesn't want to run around in the snow for long. I can get her to tug an fetch a few times inside, but she is more interested in the objects i tell her she can't have. I am glad to hear this is normal. it's been a long time since we had a pup and I have forgotten most of the rough times we had with our last.
 

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It DOES get better! Eva is now 20 weeks. We also got her at 6 weeks and she had not learned bite inhibition from her litter mates. What ended up working for us was two things in particular:

1. Time out - OMG, I LOVE TIME OUT! Eva has now learned what time out means and responds to just those words. Time out was 1 minute in a bathroom (with light on) and then gentle toy play when she came out. At first, she might go into time out 3 times within 10 minutes, but now she will stop the biting (which is MUCH less and MUCH softer) when she hears those words.

2. A spray bottle with water. One shot on the butt "snapped" her out of bite mode and gave me that extra moment to re-direct with a toy.

I could never yip high enough to startle her that way, so I had to come up with other methods.

We also use the word "easy" when she is mouthing and click and treat in response.

Lol, I have been wearing a clicker on my wrist and carrying treats in my pockets for MONTHS!

It does, indeed, get better!
 

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EXERCISE!!!

Real exercise outside of the house and OFF leash if you can!

This is what I have to do with my pups:


and clicker training is another huge help

 

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It's fairly normal behavior for a puppy, but your dog likely DID miss out on a lot of important bite inhibation training from mom and littermates because she was brought home so early.

Your best bet is to redirect the behavior. If she wants to bite your hard, get her to bite on the stuffed animal instead.

GSD puppies are known as "land sharks" for a reason....
 

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because your pup was taken from its littermates in a very important imprinting time she didn't learn bite inhibition. This sticky should explain it to you and there are great suggestions in the link to help

:http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/puppy-behavior/85888-teaching-bite-inhibition.html

And this link helps explain the important stages of pups:

Developmental Stages


I wish you luck, my pups have brought me such joy!!
Make sure you get a chance to read those links, they have great information that has helped me!
 

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Niko wasn't very affectionate (in the lovey-dovey cuddly way I was expecting) with us at that age either. It comes with time though. Be patient. :)
 

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I remember when we realized that Panzer was finally letting us pet him - we were so happy. Before that you'd lay your hand on him and he went straight at it with his sharp little puppy teeth. Every month gets better. :)
 

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because your pup was taken from its littermates in a very important imprinting time she didn't learn bite inhibition. This sticky should explain it to you and there are great suggestions in the link to help:http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/puppy-behavior/85888-teaching-bite-inhibition.html
And this link helps explain the important stages of pups:Developmental Stages
I wish you luck, my pups have brought me such joy!!
I missed the part about being taken at 6 weeks old.. eesh.. yes, read these links... like, now. :)
 

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Make sure you get a chance to read those links, they have great information that has helped me!
She sounds like my puppy also, she was found abandoned at was we think was 5-6 weeks old. Who knows how long she was on her own before that. We worked on the bite inhibition like I learned here and so far she is doing great at 10 weeks. She is still a little hyper sometimes until I take her out to run it off. Normal puppy stuff.
 
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